The Infinite Zenith

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Kouko Nosa in a Pinch!?- High School Fleet (Hai-Furi) OVA Part Two Review and Reflection

“‘…and the sea will grant each man new hope, as sleep brings dreams of home.’ Christopher Columbus.”
“Welcome to the New World, Captain.”

— Captain Ramius and Jack Ryan, The Hunt For Red October

After relaying her concerns to Mashiro and Akeno, Kouko is tasked with gathering everyone in the Harekaze class for a general assembly. Rather than idling while waiting for the deadline, Kouko decides to initiate a petition to save the Harekaze, and sets out to find her classmates at their usual hangouts. From the conversations shared by the various classmates, all of the students are troubled by their purported situation and sign onto Kouko’s petition, which also doubles to restore her spirits. On the day before their sealed orders can be opened, the Harekaze’s crew put on a festival with the hope of raising more awareness to the cause with help from Moeka and Wilhelmina’s fellow classmates. Despite a slow start, the festival sees a large number of attendees who sign onto the petition. Their event is successful, with their petition gathering a large number of signatures, and on the morning the students are permitted to open their orders, the Harekaze’s crew learn that they are to remain together under Akeno’s command, operating the Okikaze, a new vessel outfitted with operational gear from the Harekaze. Principal Munetani remarks to Akeno that the vessel can be re-designated the Harekaze, and with their new home in order, Akeno sets sail on their next adventure together with her classmates. Thus, the second of the Hai-Furi OVAs comes to a close, wrapping up in a manner that was quite welcomed even if it was foreseeable.

In spite of the melancholy ending of its precursor, the second of the Hai-Furi OVAs manages to maintain a very cheerful atmosphere. Kouko’s fears from the previous OVA turned out to have been from confirmation bias, and my speculation turned out quite close to the actual events — I had suggested that teamwork could make up a large portion of the second OVA and would result in the crew working towards bringing back the Harekaze by repairing the original vessel. Although not true in its entirety (the original Harekaze is destined to be scrapped), the Harekaze is reborn and brought back in a manner of speaking. The events of the OVA continue to build on the thematic aspects seen in the TV series, and serve a twofold purpose. The strength of the bonds amongst the Harekaze’s crew allow them to now function quite cohesively, and their faith in Akeno as a captain only serves to augment their capability. Far from being the ship that was home to the misfits, the Harekaze’s students have proven time and time again that they can pull through together to get the job done. This is not diminished even with the revelation that the Harekaze’s crew would not be disbanded: the implications were that, petition or not, their exemplary actions are worthy of praise and noticed by their command. There was never any threat or risk that they would be disbanded; how the girls responded to circulating rumours merely serves to reiterate the points raised in Hai-Furi‘s original run.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • I’ve been noticing a great deal of inbound searches for the second Hai-Furi OVA, so as stipulated, here I am writing the discussion for the second Hai-Furi OVA. Like the previous Hai-Furi OVA post, I will feature thirty screenshots fresh from the OVA, which released on BD on May 24. Despite Kouko’s entering the OVA with a subdued mood, it appears that a combination of a night’s sleep and a conversation with Mashiro, who promises to inform Akeno, lightens her up sufficiently so that she’s back up to her usual self.

  • Still inundated with paperwork, Akeno is given an update, and Mashiro reluctantly decides to help her finish. Armed with fresh resolve, she begins filling out the smaller forms at a faster pace. It’s been a shade under a week since I flew back home from Hong Kong now, and while time has resumed moving at breakneck pace since I returned to work, I was quite happy to take the vacation that I did; time flowed a little more slowly, allowing me to really enjoy the moment and take in the sights and sounds of a world away from home.

  • With a few days left until their sealed orders can be opened, Kouko shares a bold plan with Megumi and Tsugumi, intending to create a petition to convey the feelings that she and her classmates have regarding the Harekaze. Kouko references Tōgō’s actions from the Battle of Tsushima, where he ordered his fleet into a U-turn to take the same course as the Russian vessels they were engaging, at the same time preventing the Russians from launching broadside volleys. While the Japanese fleet sustained hits from the Russian ships, the Japanese gunners returned fire, hammering the Russian ships and managed to sink the Oslyabya, a Russian vessel.

  • At Tsushima, the Russians lost all of the battleships and suffered a loss that was quite shocking to the rest of the world. Kouko is referring to this battle here, to continue with a difficult course owing to the long-term outcome, and sets in motion the idea of a petition to save the Harekaze. The Battle of Tsushima was the turning point in the Russo-Japanese war and reaffirmed to the British that large caliber weapons would be instrumental to naval combat. This way of thinking precipitated the creation of larger battleships, and the belief in the battleship’s might endured until the Second World War.

  • I note that searching for the “Tougou Turn” as it appears is not too instructive: it turns up some music videos. Conversely, using “Tōgō” in place of “Tougou” brings up the Battle of Tsushima, which is more relevant to the discussion at hand. The gunnery team is initially open to the idea of a transfer to a different ship, relishing the idea of firing more powerful weapons, but their friendship with one another draw them back, coupled with the prospect of giving up having Akeno as a captain, lead them to reconsider. They sign Kouko’s petition.

  • A visit to the engineers results in additional signatures being added to Kouko’s petition. I’ve seen several forms of spelling for the character names around the ‘net – each character has a nickname, as well, and most venues for anime discussion prefer the nicknames because they are faster to type. Kouko is thus referred to as Coco. Having said this, I prefer referring to the characters by their given name: this did lead to some challenges earlier on, where I was mixing up Shima and Tama to be different people.

  • Elsewhere, Shima and Mei continue on with their own game. While Mei has consistently schooled Shima during the previous OVA and appears to be dominating the game here, Shima manages to turn the tables on her in a hilarious moment. I’m not sure if this was a budgetary constraint or a stylistic choice, but some of the backgrounds in the Hai-Furi OVAs appear to be done in the style of a watercolour painting. While there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with this, it does appear a little out of place compared with the other backgrounds, which are more consistent in style.

  • While signing a petition certainly won’t alter one’s physical appearance or likely improve their grades, Kouko manages to inspire the Navigation team to sign the petition. They had been the most visibly shaken by the news in the previous episode: it took all of Kouko’s willpower to assuage their fears without bursting into tears herself, but here, the total of Kouko’s dialogue, music and lighting seem to be insinuating to audiences that their so-called dissolution might not be what it appears, and for a supposedly-serious situation, the Hai-Furi OVA’s second half is surprisingly laid-back in emotional tenour.

  • High spirits in spite of what appears to be sobering news dominates the second Hai-Furi OVA’s first half. In the time since the first half aired, I’ve been keeping an eye on the Hai-Furi official Twitter, where build-up to the OVAs have been presented every so often. Since the OVA aired, their channel has gone quiet, and I remark that discussions surrounding both OVAs have been surprisingly minimal, with only one claim that stands out: that the first OVA was “…probably weaker than any other episode of the main series”. Such remarks can only come from a mindset that OVAs are generally frivolous, and such a belief is incorrect especially for things like Girls und Panzer and Hai-Furi.

  • The rationale for my position, that OVAs can be enjoyable and offer insights into characters, is that OVAs that are light-hearted relative to their TV counterparts provide opportunity to explore another side of the characters to more fully flesh them out. Seeing characters out of their duties and observing their interactions in a more relaxed environment, if done properly (which Hai-Furi has) can also serve to reinforce thematic elements in a show. It is for this reason that I am so fond of OVAs, and here, the navigation team continue on their photoshoot with Machiko as their subject, although their ploy to draw the crowd’s interest is unsuccessful, prompting Kouko to move on.

  • Encountering Kaede near the harbour again, Kouko learns that Kaede was contemplating leaving briefly to attend an Opera Ball, a social event where debutantes present their eligibility for marriage. She has no plans to leave long-term, at least, not until her education is complete at age eighteen, meaning that Kouko’s assumptions in the previous episode are false. With more indicators that her concerns might not come to fruition, the overall tone in the OVA shifts subtly as Kouko continues on her quest.

  • Aspects of Kaede and her aristocratic background, represents a fine example of where an OVA is able to present aspects of characters the TV series itself is not able to. Similarly, we’ve seen very little of Tsugumi and Megumi in the series proper, so giving them a bit more screentime in the OVA allows audiences to appreciate that the Harekaze’s crew are a unique, diverse group. This is why it is not always appropriate to hastily dismiss OVAs, being the rationale for why I myself enjoy anime OVAs to the extent that I do. It is also here that I remark that Megumi looks a bit like Da Capo Second Season‘s Aisia, a magician-in-training whose resolute belief in magic being used for the good of all precipitates the events of Da Capo Second Season‘s later segments.

  • I finished watching Da Capo and Da Capo Second Season a year ago. While quite unremarkable with respect to story and concept in its anime incarnation, Da Capo and its second season did manage to nail the unusual atmosphere surrounding Hatsunejima. Similarly, I rather liked Nemu Asakura and Kotori Shirakawa. My interest in Da Capo came from me coming across a collection of CooRie songs a friend had sent me years ago, and I decided to see the anime that made use of Akatsuki ni Saku Uta as its ending song. I don’t see enough positives in Da Capo or its second season to recommend, hence the lack of a review. Back in Hai-Furi, Kouko encounter Minami, obtains her signature for their petition and learns that she enjoys the hover-board because it mimics the rise and fall of the sea.

  • The Harekaze’s crew put on a grandoise festival in order to raise awareness for their cause, and despite the amount of effort they’ve put in (even recruiting Moeka and Wilhelmina to assist), the day is off to a slow start with low attendee numbers. Disappointment reigns supreme, but things quickly turn around when Akeno shows up – the profound change in morale amongst the students is nothing short of remarkable.

  • Stepping into the open-air stage, Akeno and Moeka perform a live song that turns things around: although her role in the OVAs has been primarily restricted to dealing with paperwork while Kouko’s been out and about, she now carries with her the same presence as Miho of Girls und Panzer, as well as the great heroes from Lord of the Rings: when folks like Aragorn, Legolas or Gimli stepped onto the battlefield, characters and audiences alike knew that the situation would be well in hand as extraordinary folk went to work. The similarities between Miho and Akeno are noticeable: both are capable leaders who believe in leading by example, each motivated by an event in their past, and over time, earn the respect of their classmates with their actions.

  • Following the live concert performance, attendance at the festival skyrockets, and the Harekaze curry being sold is depleted. Other students step up to the plate and bring in supplies to make festival foods such as takoyaki and okonomiyaki, and all sorts of things, like, such as that. During my last day in Japan, at the Kansai International Airport, I had Botejyu’s seafood okonomiyaki – an authentic taste of Tamayura, it was absolutely delicious, featuring succulent prawns and cuttlefish in a flavourful batter, topped with a hearty sauce. I subsequently explored the airport’s shopping outlets and purchased the Kimi no na wa movie guide while waiting for baggage check-in to open.

  • It’s been a week since my final day in Hong Kong, which I spent shopping at Taikoo Shing Cityplaza. I came across Ian Lambot and Greg Girard “City of Darkness”, running for about 110 CAD. Tempted though I was to buy it, the book was very bulky and would have presented considerable challenges to bring in my carry-on. We stopped for lunch at a Pizza Hut at Cityplaza, ordering a Seafood pizza (scallops, prawns and pineapple toppings with a sausage-cheese crust), before continuing to explore Hong Kong University and Central. The evening was rounded out with a family dinner. At present day, a week after returning to routine, I enjoyed another family dinner at the T. Pot China Bistro much closer to home: the Cantonese cuisine back home is of the same standard of that in Hong Kong, being of an excellent quality. Elements inspired by Vietnamese, Thai and Canadian elements make their way into dishes here: our dinner tonight encompassed wonton soup, sweet and sour pork, roast crispy chicken, yi mein and shrimps in a savory sauce.

  • Back in Hai-Furi, Hiromi, Kouko and Maron admire a fireworks display rounding off their festival; despite a sluggish opening, combined efforts from everyone make the event an unqualified success. Numerous signatures are gathered as attendees visit to enjoy Akeno and Moeka’s singing, the curry and other festival foods. The effort the Harekaze’s crew places into the festival move the attendees, prompting them to sign Kouko’s petition, allowing them to accrue a large number of signatures.

  • Later that evening, Akeno, Mashiro and Kouko carry the signatures to their superior officers, resolute on illustrating that they do not wish to go separate ways with a crew that has accomplished so much during a crisis. The course of this meeting is not shown, although it is not unreasonable to suppose that their higher-ups will simply commend them on their resolve, tell them to leave the petition with them and that a decision will be reached in the morning, when everyone is finally cleared to open their sealed envelopes.

  • The skies are pleasant on this June day when everyone assembles. The atmosphere is tense as the Harekaze’s crew await the instructions allowing them to open their documents. While certainly not something I would recommend or personally do, there is a way to open adhesive-sealed envelopes in a reasonably difficult-to-trace manner. The process is quite simple and was used in Tom Clancy’s Threat Vector: place the envelope in a freezer for around an hour, and carefully cut at the interface where the sealant is with a sharp knife. Cooling makes the sealant brittle, allowing it to be cut without tearing the paper. Once the document is inspected, re-sealing the envelope is as simple as letting the envelope thaw.

  • When the order is issued, each of the Harekaze’s crew apprehensively open their letters, learning they are to be transferred to a new vessel. Seemingly confirming Kouko’s fears, it turns out that she, and everyone else present, is to be moving to the vessel Y-469. These are transfer orders as Wilhelmina had predicted, but far from what Kouko was expecting – everyone is moving together into a new vessel after the Harekaze was found to have sustained excessive damage, and as such, will be sticking together as a class. Principal Munetani and other members in command have found the Harekaze’s actions to be commendable, and impressed with their abilities as a team, permits them to stick together.

  • Kouko’s relief and happiness is written all over her expression here; it’s a beautiful sight to behold. Because the sealed envelopes had been printed and issued well before Kouko was aware of their existence, it would appear that the Harekaze’s crew were never in any risk of being separated from one another. A secondary theme in the Hai-Furi OVAs, then, is that there are occasions when fear of bad news drives individuals to worry needlessly, and that it might have been to simply wait for the news before making any decisions. With this being said, had Kouko acted as common sense might dictate, there would have been no Hai-Furi OVA to enjoy.

  • Designated Okikaze (literally “Flourishing Wind”), Akeno climbs into the bridge of the vessel Y-469 and finds Garfield Isoroku sitting on the instruments. She realises that all of the equipment is familiar, right down to the binoculars, compass, wheel and fire control systems: the other bridge crew marvel at this seeming miracle, as well, feeling as though they are reuniting with an old friend after a long separation.

  • Elsewhere on board the Y-469, the different crews make similar discoveries in that much of the Harekaze’s equipment seems to have been transferred wholesale onto the new vessel. From the engine room to navigation and everywhere in between, familiar traces of home are found. What the girls are feeling is probably best approximated with the real-world analogue of restoring a new iPad or iPhone to a backup after an accident that totals one’s older device. Thanks to iCloud backups, users can rapidly restore data and settings to new devices should they lose an older device, and in this day and age, our data’s value grows to be much more valuable than the physical device itself.

  • Mikan Irako, the Harekaze’s head cook, hugs her beloved rice cooker upon learning that it has been restored and placed in the Y-469’s galley. The rice cooker was one of the first items to be listed in the damage report, being dented during the skirmish in the first episode, and became the subject of no small discussion. I remarked that the rice cooker should still work, since its walls did not appear to be compromised, but discussions elsewhere were much lengthier. To see this reaction from Mikan is a reminder that Hai-Furi does pay attention to the details in its characters, and I smiled at this moment.

  • Outside, the weapons team admires their vessel’s 15 cm SK C/28, an upgrade from the 12.7 cm/50 Type 3 naval gun the Harekaze originally ran with. This weapon was originally fit to Fubuki-class destroyers, and on the note of Fubuki and destroyers, I’ve heard unverified rumours that KanColle: The Movie will see a home release on August 30. I felt that the anime, for all of its impressive visual effects and masterpiece of a soundtrack, did not compel me to try Kantai Collection or move me with its story. Having said that, I am still interested to see what the movie is like, and I might drop by to review this movie as time permits.

  • Back on the bridge, Principal Munetani explains that Y-469, Orikaze, was a new vessel laid down and intended to be an addition to the fleet, but in light of circumstances, they took the unfinished vessel and fitted its interior with equipment from the Harekaze. This course of action suggests that the original Harekaze’s internal structures must have sustained extensive damage beyond repair even if the hull appeared to have been damaged minimally. She allows Akeno to re-christian the Y-469 as the Harekaze, and if there is to be a continuation of Hai-Furi, I will refer to Y-469 as Harekaze II on account of all of the trials the original Harekaze went through.

  • In a cruel bit of irony, Moeka is taken aside for reprimand, having been involved with a matter she was unauthorised to deal with. One would imagine that the repercussions are not too severe in nature: its military setting and unexpected narrative direction notwithstanding, Hai-Furi is, at its best, a tale of human team spirit and cooperation. Something more severe would not be consistent with the message that Hai-Furi has aimed to send since its plot began to materialise in Hai-Furi‘s televised run.

  • In life, folks win some, and they lose some; today, Akeno and her friends win some, big time. Here, the bridge crew prepare to take the Harekaze II on a test run. This is the end of the two Hai-Furi OVAs, and my final verdict is that I enjoyed them, as they add a bit more to the characters that were not frequently seen during Hai-Furi itself. The OVAs are definitely worth watching for that reason, and a new Harekaze opens the possibility for new adventures. It seemed a shame to waste a finely-crafted world, and if Hai-Furi goes down the same route as Brave Witches, a continuation could prove worthwhile to watch.

  • In news quite unrelated to Hai-Furi, it turns out that my preorder for Your Name‘s novel incarnation, which was set for release on May 23, arrived on May 16, a full week before the release date. It speaks to Canada Post’s efficiency and just how on their game that Chapters-Indigo is for deliveries. As we move into the final few days of May, the biggest posts on the horizon will deal with Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare Remastered and Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare. I finished the game today, and will be looking to write a final impressions post on it, plus some reflections on Modern Warfare Remastered in the new future. As for anime-related posts, the largest planned post is a revisitation of Garden of Words: it will have been four years since I watched it, and I do wish to look at this film again before diving into a full-scale discussion of Your Name come July.

The second of two OVAs is now in the books, and was an enjoyable addition to Hai-Furi. I have remarked that the outcomes are predictable; there was never any doubt that Kouko and her classmates would be separated, especially with their previous role in saving the Musashi in mind. However, I place less emphasis on the outcome and more on the journey taken, so seeing the events of this second Hai-Furi OVA unfold and progress was most entertaining. More so than the first OVA, this OVA portrays the commitment and unity shared universally amongst the Harekaze’s crew. To see them take the initiative and, within legal bounds, do what they can to save their vessel was admirable. To see the entire crew unify and undergo a dramatic improvement in morale when Akeno appears was moving — this is the mark of a good leader, to be able to single-handedly lift spirits simply by making an appearance. Viewers are given an opportunity to see Akeno sing when she performs a song for her classmates and the festival’s attendees with Moeka. With all of these elements in mind, one must wonder about what a continuation could entail; a Tweet from the official Hai-Furi Twitter account strongly hints at a future project, stating that “Planning and policies for various projects are under way. Please look forward to it”. While we’ve heard little since then, having Hai-Furi go through a more involved narrative, possibly featuring a plot to destroy the Blue Mermaids, and the Harekaze’s involvement in thwarting this scheme, could definitely be something that I would be interested to watch.

12 responses to “Kouko Nosa in a Pinch!?- High School Fleet (Hai-Furi) OVA Part Two Review and Reflection

  1. ernietheracefan May 28, 2017 at 05:38

    You should call her Shin Harekaze Kai.. :p

    If S2 would be announced, I hope Haifuri would have the same amount of popularity as GuP & World Witches have..

    Like

    • infinitezenith May 29, 2017 at 09:21

      That’s not a bad choice, but not particularly scalable: the odds of the Harekaze’s crew totalling Y-469 are non-trivial, and I could see them wrecking another ship to complete their assignment and protect what’s dear to them. What would we call the Harekaze III and IV? 😉

      I’ve not been keeping up until now and imagined that Hai-Furi sales were average or below average, but looking through old sales figures suggests that it’s done quite well, comparable to Re:ZERO and JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure‘s latest entry (eclipsing Flying Witch, which I found to be one of the best anime of last year’s spring season. The sales figures suggest that Hai-Furi was well-received by Japanese fans, and in conjunction with an old Tweet, shows that there is interest for it. Perhaps a second season could further bolster its popularity, especially if it is done well.

      Like

  2. アリア June 3, 2017 at 22:12

    On 2ch, some users reported that over 9000 BDs (Hai-Furi OVA) have been sold, but I could not find any genuine / trustworthy source that can prove this figure.

    Like

    • infinitezenith June 3, 2017 at 23:20

      I appreciate the information and have made the changes. Thankfully, I read your comment on my iPad and caught everything: approving the comment had the effect of blowing away the other material below because of the Baidu link. For that, I’m sorry: I have a plugin that automatically removes Baidu links because of some troubles I’ve had from spammers in the past, linking to malware. I don’t wish my readers’ security to be compromised, so you can understand my caution.

      What did you think of the OVAs as a whole, and Hai-Furi‘s future? If that’s the case, to have exceeded 9000 sales total, this is a series that has done quite well, all things considered.

      Like

      • アリア June 4, 2017 at 08:48

        Sorry for linking to Baidu – I browsed the “Baidu Tieba” and the image is hosted there. I will now avoid Baidu links to prevent confusion.

        I wonder why after returning to Yokosuka on May 5, the students do not care about having no vessel for training until June 9. Oh, they may be busy studying for the midterm exams, but aren’t they the ones who can’t keep up in school ([1]), and passed with the lowest scores ([2])? In addition, they play an important role in solving the incident. Being the stakeholders, shouldn’t they have the right to express their opinion (before the school officials made the decision and distribute the sealed orders to them)?

        But just like what you have said in your reviews, if everything is so logical and things are done out of common sense, there will be no OVAs to enjoy. I particularly find it interesting to discover more of the supporting characters. Satoko is a bit “airhead” (天然ボケ), Mayumi and Hideko mind their skin color and bust size respectively, and the 12-year-old Minami has her cute side but is also very talented in IT. I have an idea: if she is able to hack into the systems and retrieve citizens’ information so easily, they could ask her to hack into the school’s network, search the meeting records for the school’s decision (whether Harekaze will be dissolved).

        I found this page ([3]) which claims that the sales figures are based on some rankings ([4]). It seems that the OVA is more popular (9000+) than the TV episodes (5000+ to 6000+), maybe because OVA 1 succeeded in keeping the audiences interested by making one episode available for free and let them wonder the fate of the students. The banner and other promotional images used on the anime’s official Twitter ([5]) is carefully modified from the actual cover used on the BD/DVD ([6], [7]) so that the fact that they are assigned Y-469 is hidden prior to the sale.

        By the way, if there is no OVA 1 available, judging solely from the BD/DVD cover, I will be misled into thinking that there are going to be lots of “fan service” scenes and nothing else, which is not worth buying to me. I am generally satisfied with the OVA and will give a score of 8/10. (I bought a BD and the bonus audio CD contained a drama of the logistics which is quite good. Without the CD I may give 7.)

        P.S. In your opinion, what has Thea and Wilhelmina (“Mina”) discussed in the afternoon on June 9? Thea used German to talk to Mina but did not greet / have any conversation with Kouko (Why?) (6/9 noon), then Wilhelmina invited Kouko to join her school (6/9 night), and Thea and Wilhelmina agreed to help Kouko (6/10 night).

        [1] ましろ「なんで晴風なんだろう…これじゃ私落ちこぼれだ…」/ TV Episode 1
        [2] 芽依「そりゃ晴風は合格した生徒の中でも最底辺が配属される船かもしれないけど」/ TV Episode 2
        [3] http://dvdbd.wiki.fc2.com/wiki/%E3%83%8F%E3%82%A4%E3%82%B9%E3%82%AF%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AB%E3%83%BB%E3%83%95%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%83%88
        [4] http://dvdbd.wiki.fc2.com/wiki/wiki%E3%81%AE%E5%88%A9%E7%94%A8%E3%81%AB%E3%81%82%E3%81%9F%E3%81%A3%E3%81%A6
        [5] https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_banners/4593216259/1488269957/1500×500
        [6] https://twitter.com/hai_furi/status/867575954306207745
        [7] https://i.imgur.com/8RezsFq.jpg

        Like

        • infinitezenith June 8, 2017 at 20:54

          I must first apologise for the tardiness of my response: I’ve been busy with work over the past week. Further to this, thanks for providing the hard figures; they’ve been very informative. Now, we get to the meat-and-potatoes of this reply, and as paper-thin as my speculations might be for your queries about Hai-Furi, I’ll try to do my best to answer them. Here goes!

          For why the Harekaze’s students were not particularly concerned, the combination of their post-season euphoria at simply having survived their ordeal without serious repercussions (e.g. a court-martial) and the combination of exams means not being to worried about things: concerned with their own activities, I imagine the students are thinking that the school would handle things, which is why no one is too worried. In particular, Akeno doesn’t seem too concerned, and she’s shown to be quite an influence on the others, hence their generally cheerful mindsets, too.

          The school’s reason for keeping things quiet has a bit more reasoning behind it: high level administrative decisions happen behind closed doors precisely to prevent partial news from impacting the student’s opinions too early on, and rumours could make it difficult to proceed with a plan. In this case, it is probably to prevent their new acquisition from being known to the other students, who might want upgrades or special favours. This is a school, and playing favourites usually doesn’t fly too well in the education system. As for why Minami won’t hack the system, there are several plausible explanations: she’s unlikely to endanger her standing in the school, and it is conceivable that the security protocols they have would make it difficult to make an attempt without being detected. A much neater way to figure out what’s going on is much simpler than hacking, requiring no more than a freezer, is mentioned in my post 😉

          Finally, Thea and Wilhelmina’s conversation is probably quite unrelated, dealing with the German school’s matters. It is not unreasonable for a higher ranking officer to make a request to subordinates who are in conversation without addressing the other participant, especially if an urgent matter is in hand. More than likely, Thea requires a bit of Wilhelmina’s time dealing with their own issues, and later, Wilhelmina shares with Thea her worries about Kouko and the Harekaze, explaining why Thea is willing to help out then. The OVAs do leave a bit of filling-in-the-gaps to carry out, but they do not require too large of a subjective leap to work out 🙂

          Like

          • アリア June 10, 2017 at 06:57

            Thank you for the reply. You have made some good points that I was unable to think of. Now that you mention it, given the plot in the OVA (and the presence of the mahjong girls who like gossiping), it is reasonable that the officials have to keep the decisions confidential.

            Is it OK to use the old parts from Harekaze? I believe that the electronic parts have been submerged and rendering things like telephones and freezer unusable…

            Please accept my apology for not doing my homework – I read the pamphlet again after reading your comment, only to find out the following sentence describing the Harekaze II:
            「主砲は、アドミラル・グラフ・シュペー用の15センチ予備副砲を元に、小改造が行われて搭載されている。」
            (“The main battery/gun is based on the spare secondary battery/gun on the Admiral Graf Spee, with some small modifications.”)
            I guess this may be why Thea has to talk to Wilhelmina.

            In addition, the Harekaze II engine ([1]) is now the same as other Kagerō-class vessels, which has a lower maximum speed than before. ([2]) Because of the change, the engine becomes more reliable and the Chief Engineer Maron may find herself a bit less satisfied. After the departure, Kouko requests for adding a TV and BD player, but is unsuccessful. ([3])

            References:
            [1] Harekaze II specs, BD/DVD pamphlet: ボイラー:ロ号艦本式缶3基
            [2] Harekaze II description, BD/DVD pamphlet: 艦自体の最高速度は、機関が初代晴風の高圧缶から、ほかの陽炎型と同じものになったため、出力と共に低下している。
            [3] To be on the safe side, the related sentences are not quoted. Interested parties may acquire a genuine copy of BD/DVD to find out more.

            Note:
            Because of my limited Japanese ability, I cannot guarantee that the above information (and translation) is/are completely accurate without any errors. Corrections are always welcome.

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            • infinitezenith June 11, 2017 at 22:09

              On the Harekaze’s old components, I think that some of the parts might’ve been damaged for sure, especially anything with electronic elements. Salt water does a number on metals, and it is equally possible that, in their excitement, the girls are forgetting that things like the same model of a freezer can be acquired quickly. Other parts have probably been salvaged after it was determined to be functional and given some cleaning. It does come across as a bit contrived, but as Hai-Furi previously required a greater suspension of disbelief than in the OVAs, this is acceptable.

              The revelation of why Wilhelmina and Thea share a conversation might be to discuss their school’s procurement of a materiel to help the Harekaze is definitely a strong contender for their conversation and resulting reactions. Even in the absence of a fully translated text, I think we’ve reasonably worked out what has happened there. Hope this was helpful 🙂

              Like

  3. entah_lah (@entah_lah93) June 10, 2017 at 01:47

    Nice review. I might say the Y467 Harekaze is still a legend. I still wait for this: may the legend still lives.

    Like

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