The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

The Real Life Camping Grounds and Two Campers’ Views: An Armchair Journey of Yuru Camp△ Part Two

“Life is a journey, and if you fall in love with the journey, you will be in love forever.” –Peter Hagerty

Yuru Camp△‘s first episode set the precedence for what to expect with respect to attention to detail and atmosphere, so when the anime continued into its run, it was hardly surprising that the locations depicted were highly faithful to their real-world counterparts. As the anime moved ahead, Rin undertakes a camping trip at Fumotoppara. Her solitude is soon interrupted by Nadeshiko, who’s asked Sakura to help drive her there. With a host of ingredients in tow, Nadeshiko makes a fantastic dinner for Rin as a thank you for earlier. Later, Nadeshiko formally joins with the Outdoors Activity Club and takes a camping trip together with Chiaki and Aoi at. Their adventures happen in parallel with Rin, who takes a solo journey out to Kirigamine Highland in Nagano prefecture with her shiny new bike. Like Rin’s journey to Koan, details in both trips are rendered with exceptional precision, to the point where one could follow the girls’ travels in a near-flawless manner and experience what they did with naught more than a set of coordinates representing the routes they took. Similar to the last post, I will be making use of Google Maps’ Street View utility – all of the screenshots shown here are openly available on Google Maps. The landmarks, such as train stations and the Fuefukigawa Fruit Park, are trivially easy to find. My approach in tracking down Rin’s route through Nagano is a bit more involved but still straightforwards: because Yuru Camp△ takes the time to show highway signs, it becomes possible to work out which route the sign is found on and what intersections it might be near. With this one, a range of locations between the second and forth episodes are found, illustrating the exceptional details Yuru Camp△ places into illustrating the locations the girls travel through and to.

  • Rin travels along a small road off Route 139 leading to Fumotoppara Campground. The Google Street View team evidently has come later in the year: the leaves have already fallen from the many of the trees, making the distant hills and plains more visible than in Yuru Camp△.

  • This view is taken some 15 kilometres away, as the mole digs, from the quiet country road Rin is travelling on: we are looking east along Route 803 towards the bridge that Nadeshiko was crossing in the first episode. From Nadeshiko making a request to the point where she touches down at Fumotoppara, every step in Yuru Camp△ is presented. This is one of the reasons why I count Yuru Camp△ worthy of the mantle “Survivorman The Anime” – Les Stroud is very meticulous and methodical in his survival advice, similar to how things are done in Yuru Camp△.

  • While Sakura was seen giving Nadeshiko a (admittedly adorable) physical beating in the first episode, her willingness to drive her all the way out to Fumotoppara from Nanbu is a strong indicator of the warm bond that the two siblings have. A large mountain range separates the two locations – the road distance is a hair over 40 kilometres, and owing to speed limits, it takes around an hour to go around the mountains.

  • The Fuji River is visible down Route 10 here: in both the anime and real-world images, the green guardrails lining the road and a train tunnel to the right, are visible. With a total length of 128 kilometers, the Fuji River features several dams along its run for generating power, and downstream, the bridge where the Tōkaidō Shinkansen crosses the Fuji River, with Mount Fuji visible in the background, is one of Japan’s most iconic views. When I first looked at my itinerary to Japan more than a year ago, I thought I would be going south through Shizuoka, but my travels brought me to Yamanashi and Nagano.

  • The turn here is located along Route 469 near the Hachiman Shrine between the Toshima and Inako station. The mountains in Japan are by no means formidable compared to the likes of the giants that characterise the Canadian Rockies, but nonetheless represent barriers to travel. Tracing the route that Sakura takes to Asagiri Plateau shows that she’s taking the most efficient route possible. This is logical from a production perspective, as well – the art crews are unlikely to be impressed if their route is all over the place, and it is more economical to simply follow a route and render choice points along the way.

  • This stretch of road is quite near Asagiri Plateau: owing to the narrow lanes, the speed limit here is 50 kilometres per hour. It is located around 21.6 kilometres (thirty-six minutes) away from the point illustrated in the earlier set of screenshots: the times and distances returned by Google Maps indicates that a speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour is the norm. While this seems very slow, having driven on narrow mountain roads, I can say with confidence that these lower speed limits are intentionally so for the drivers’ safety: while in Banff National Park, the narrow, winding roads to some features are such that I feel uncomfortable going any faster than 30 kilometres per hour.

  • While Google Maps passed this area in November, the area has dense foliage. By comparison, the anime incarnation of this area shows a much sparser foliage, making Mount Fuji more visible. Careful inspection of the images also show that along the guard rails of Route 139, those tall grasses are visible in both the anime and real-world screenshots, suggesting that, even if I’m not precisely where Nadeshiko and Sakura pass by, I must be close. The choice of colours in Yuru Camp△ suggest a much chillier, drier day.

  • As evening sets in, Sakura and Nadeshiko finally reach the parking lot at Fumotoppara. This wide open expanse is a far cry from the cozier spaces of Koan Campground at Lake Motosu: with an elevation of some eight hundred metres above sea level, the region east of Mount Fuji consists of a large amount of pasture land. This is quite suitable for dairy farming, and during Yuru Camp△‘s final camping trip, Chiaki and Aoi enjoy ice cream from a local producer.

  • The Outdoor Activities Club’s first camping trip takes them to Hottarakashi Campground. Minobu Station to Yamanashi Station is around an hour and sixteen minutes by train, and from here, the girls have a bit of an uphill walk to reach their campsite: it’s 4.1 kilometres out, and while this can be walked very quickly, Aoi, Chiaki and Nadeshiko are also carrying a nontrivial amount of gear for their trip. As such, when the girls reach the uphill portion of their walk, they tire very quickly.

  • The bridge over Fuefuki River is less than two hundred metres from Yamanashi Station, and true to its real-world counterpart, has a railing that is reproduced faithfully. The smokestacks visible in the Yuru Camp△ screenshot are not found in the real-world equivalent: this series of warehouse and storage tanks belong to the Japan Carbon Co. Ltd: they have a manufacturing plant in Yamanashi.

  • Nadeshiko’s boundless energy stands in stark contrast with Aoi and Chiaki, who slowly haul their gear up the mountain. During this trip, Nadeshiko is also carrying an entire rice cooker. This road is located off a right turn on Route 140: maps mark this as “Fruit park Entrance”, and the street lamps here are fruit-themed, as seen in their distinct red housings. One interesting thing in Japan is that their streets don’t have names: districts in Japan are divided into blocks, and while unintuitive for us gweilos, the system is actually similar to the Military Grid Reference System that NATO militaries use.

  • While I leave readers to again enjoy the similarites between Yuru Camp△ and real life, I continue on from the point before. Use of a system similar to the MGRS eliminates ambiguity: back in Canada, if I say “5th Street and 4th Avenue”, because of the way this works, I could be referring to different intersection. To solve this, I would need to specify which 5th Street and 4th Avenue I’m referring to (e.g. 5th Street East and 4th Avenue North). Another minor detail about Japanese addresses is that they start with a coarse granularity and work their way down, while addresses most of my readers are familiar with will start with a fine granularity and work their way up.

  • After an ardous climb that leaves Chiaki and Aoi exhausted, the girls reach the park at the base of Fuefuki Fruit Park. Nadeshiko has energy to spare and runs around like a cheerful puppy, and while the Street View has not provided readers with the same view of Mount Fuji that Yuru Camp△ does, on a clear day, the summit of the stratovolcano is just visible over the other mountains in the distance.

  • The Fuefukigawa Fruit Museum consists of three large glass domes. One acts as a greenhouse and houses a variety of tropical fruits, the second is a combined restaurant, fruit shop and book store, and the third is an enclosed open space that occasionally hosts performances. For folks in this area, the museum is definitely worth visiting: for one, it’s free admissions, and the area also provides a spectacular view of the Yamanashi valley below. The domes are open between 09:00 and 17:00, and the gardens and parks surrounding these are always open. I will be covering Nadeshiko and the others’ camping experience at Hottarakashi in a later post.

  • We hop over some 46.25 kilometres (as the mole digs) to a spot on Route 17: Rin passes by this point on her way to the Kirigamine Highland. For both anime and real-world images, some greenhouses are visible here. I passed through this region last year while travelling from Lake Kawaguchi to the Shirakabako Hotel on the shores of Lake Shirakaba last year: rather than Route 17, I was on the Chuo Expressway. Unlike the Outdoor Activities Club’s camp, whose locations are not only walkable, but also trivially easy to locate, Rin’s route is a bit more obscure. Locating it by brute force would take forever, and this is time I don’t have, especially considering that I did not pass along this road, but fortunately, there is a trick.

  • We recall that in my previous Yuru Camp△ armchair journey, I mentioned that the total accuracy in signs between the anime and real-world incarnations would be useful. With this sign, we know that Rin is taking Route 17 and is coming up on an intersection for the Yatsugatake-Echo Line (八ヶ岳工コーライン on the sign). With this, we can precisely pin down where Rin is, and from here, it becomes reasonably straightforwards to trace Rin’s path as she travels into the Kirigamine Highlands.

  • Moving along Route 17, one can see all of the intersections Rin stops at: she’s following a car with a dog in it for a considerable distance, and I feel that a some of the Manga Time Kirara series seem to have animal motifs for their characters. Gochuumon wa Usagi Desu Ka?‘s characters resemble bunnies, while Kiniro Mosaic and K-On! characters are kitten-like. In Yuru Camp△, puppies seem to be the motif.

  • We are very nearly at the end of this post, and I will take some time to explain the rationale behind these posts. While looking around for information, I found another series of similar posts that dealt with the real-world locations of Yuru Camp△. While similarly detailed as the content here, the difference between my posts and theirs is that theirs uses small 320 by 140 images. My story with location hunt posts begins in 2012, when I was given a request to translate and make accessible a series of location posts for CLANNADKanon and The Disappearance of Suzumiya Haruhi. Originally formatted in SHIFT-JIS, the pages were indecipherable in some browsers and featured tiny images that made comparison difficult.

  • I am forgiving of the old SHIFT-JIS sites because years back, broadband was just becoming commonplace and bandwidth was still expensive. However, it is now 2018: 2007 called and want their 320 by 140 images back. These images are too small to be comfortably viewed on a phone and are too fuzzy to appreciate on a desktop browser – I know that some folks are protective of their content, but we exist in an age where some things exist to be shared. Since the screenshots of Yuru Camp△ and the corresponding locations in Google Maps are publicly accessible, I see no reason that anyone should play the gatekeeper for freely available content. As such, this series of posts will feature screenshots in a proper resolution.

  • While I’m a bit lazy to link the screenshots directly, folks interested in checking the locations out for themselves can always click on the links to do so, and I am willing to send out links to the full-resolution screenshots if there is demand for them. Returning the party to Yuru Camp△, we’ve reached the Kirigamine Highlands, and here, Rin stops in front of the Chaplin Restaurant, which visitors have remarked to have a good view and reasonable service. However, Rin’s destination is a smaller inn to the back, known as the Korobokkuru Hutte. This inn is not reachable via Street View, but by this point in time, I should have no troubles in convincing readers that Korobokkuru Hutte is also faithful to its real-world counterpart.

  • Up here on the Kirigamine Highlands, it feels distinctly like the open plains around Southern Alberta’s foothills. Shorty after the episode aired, I popped up here for myself and located the very same traffic webcam that Rin is waving from. Because I knew where Korobokkuru Hutte was, I reasoned out Rin’s path of travel and found a gas station facility further to the west. I’ve mentioned this in the earlier post, but for folks who don’t like clicking on links back to another page on this blog, here is the location in Google Maps. In my talk at Yuru Camp△‘s halfway point, I noted that the webcam Rin waved at is real and has a website providing real-time footage. However, because it is powered by Flash, readers will have to give Flash permission to run in order to see anything.

  • iOS devices will not run Flash unless jailbroken, and Android devices need some tinkering with to run Flash, so if you’re running stock iOS, that link to the webcam won’t work. I left my talk at Yuru Camp△‘s halfway point on the conclusion that in Yuru Camp△, either Flash is more secure and mobile phones allow Flash to run natively or Nadeshiko has 1337 phone customisation skills. This brings my second part of the Yuru Camp△ armchair journey to a close, and looking ahead, there is to be one more part in this mini-series. This final post should be out before May is over, but for now, my attention has turned towards Amanchu! Advance and Sword Art Online Alternative: Gun Gale Online, which has turned out surprisingly engaging. As well, with Battlefield 1‘s latest weapons crate update, and some of my latest experiences, I will also be looking to share that with readers in the very near future.

Thanks to remarks from Yuru Camp△‘s author, Afro, and a bit of Google-fu, Rin’s second campground is quickly pinned down, along with the location of Korobokkuru Hutte, a small restaurant that Rin stopped at en route to her campground in Nagano and the route the Outdoors Activity Club take on their way to Pine Wood campground, including Fuefukigawa Fruit Park and Hottarakashi onsen. To be able to trace these routes means that fans can experience both Rin and the Outdoors Activity Club’s travels in full, down to the exact same dishes and food items that the girls enjoy on their adventures. With this in mind, the Outdoors Activity Club’s trip to Pine Wood is the easier of the two to replicate for visitors: Yamanashi station up to the campground is around a 4.7 kilometre walk. With an elevation gain of 371 metres, the walk can be completed in around 50 minutes at a moderate pace. By comparison, Rin’s travels from Minobu to Korobokkuru Hutte is around 102 minutes and spans 108 kilometres: the shorter route has a toll, so it follows that Rin will be going the long way around. Unless one has their own transportation, following in Rin’s footsteps would be rather more difficult. Consequently, if individuals were interested in retracing the adventures of Yuru Camp△, I imagine that a greater number of recollections for Nadeshiko and her friends’ path would exist. However, this should not dissuade inquisitive individuals from checking Rin’s journey to Nagano if their resources allow for it – as I’ve mentioned in the first part of this Armchair Tour of Yuru Camp△, if you’ve got adventures to share about your visit, I would love to hear about it!

2 responses to “The Real Life Camping Grounds and Two Campers’ Views: An Armchair Journey of Yuru Camp△ Part Two

  1. DerekL May 13, 2018 at 11:46

    I turned my wife loose with the previous post in this series, and she spent over an hour virtually travelling down the roads in the vicinity of the first campground… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • infinitezenith May 13, 2018 at 11:48

      A literal armchair journey, then! I hope she’s enjoyed exploring the locations: one of the great joys about Street View is being able to see a spot very easily, and while I imagine Google intended it a tool for helping with navigation, it’s not a bad way to spend a morning to explore. Only thing better is the real deal!

      Liked by 1 person

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