The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

The Division: Onslaught, Exploring the West Side Pier and The Urban MDR

“We choose to…do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organise and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win, and the others, too.” —John F. Kennedy

The Division‘s latest Global Event, Onslaught, allows players to deal one of burn, bleed or gas effects to enemies, and players may cycle through the different effects by reloading. The end effect is dealing additional status effects damage that can temporarily immobilise enemies and take them briefly out of the fight by lighting them on fire or disorienting them. By making use of the different effects, players can control fights in a manner of their choosing and engage enemies in a novel way that adds a bit of flair to the gameplay. While this global event was active, I decided to take advantage of the status effects to see if I could acquire more exotic caches, and also had the chance to explore the West Side Pier, a new area added to the game in the 1.8 patch. The northwestern side of mid-town Manhattan was previously inaccessible, but now, two new game modes and new places to explore have been added: I’ve not explored this area until now, but it is an intriguing place with a replica of the real New York’s Aircraft Carrier Intrepid museum. Here, the different enemy factions all work together against the players, and there are no civilians or allied JTF forces: it’s one of the most challenging areas of the game to be in outside of the Dark Zone, and offers the resistance game mode, where players square off against endless waves of enemies. It’s an entertaining mode that allows one to test their loadouts, and also offers an additional avenue of acquiring gear, although by this point in my experiences within The Division, the modes of acquiring gear have largely become irrelevant – high end pieces and gear set items have dropped with such frequency that they’re all I see in the game now.

With a reasonably viable setup in The Division, as well as the all-exotic loadout, my sights have been to acquire an Urban MDR. Modelled after the Desert Tech Micro Dynamic Rifle chambered for the 7.62mm rounds, the Urban MDR is a semi-automatic battle rifle with the Distracted talent, which allows the weapon to deal bonus damage on targets affected with status effects. It hits harder than other assault rifles and is comparable to the semi-automatic marksman rifles for damage, but in exchange, the vertical recoil on the weapon is stronger in the absence of a compensator, and the weapon can become unruly without a good under-barrel grip. The weapon is at its finest when used in conjunction with the Firecrest or Predator’s Mark builds with some Tactician’s Authority pieces, which allows the gun to almost always make use of the additional damage bonus, but in Onslaught, the extra status effects also allowed me to try the weapon out without needing to extensively modify my setup. The Urban MDR can be a fun weapon to use: it has the attributes of an assault rifle with the damage of some of the weaker marksman rifles. The end result is a weapon that has increased armour damage and a theoretical maximum magazine capacity of 44 rounds that fires slowly and hits like a truck: the Urban MDR is unique among the assault rifles in how it handles, and it looks beastly, as well. This is why I was looking to acquire an Urban MDR – the weapon has special attributes that add another, interesting way to playing The Division. However, up until now, my luck had not seen me find one. It was during the Onslaught event that I joined up with a team to take on the Warrengate Power Plant on legendary, and while we were wiped once during the boss fight, I managed to use another well-timed Recovery Link during our second attempt to help give my teammates a fighting chance. For my troubles, I got a weekly cache (having finished my quota of missions) and an exotic cache from completing the mission.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Battlefield 4 does not have a pink weapon skin, and The Division lacks a P90. When the Onslaught event began, I was just getting caught up with Sword Art Online Alternative: Gun Gale Online. The closest I came to replicating the LLEN loadout is with any submachine gun with the pink camouflage: The House is an absolute beast, and is my favourite weapon for getting out of a tight spot. I normally go with grey or tan weapon camouflages to make myself more difficult to spot: the bright pink means I’m visible from a klick away and does not serve me well at all in places like the Dark Zone.

  • I engage rogue agents here on my own with the inevitable results. Because dying in the Dark Zone as a non-rogue no longer has any penalties to it, one of my favourite strategies is to bait rogue players into killing me repeatedly, increasing their rank and possibly trigger a manhunt. I’ve managed to do this on a few occasions: I’m completely geared towards PvE, having a maximum of a 70 percent boost to armour destruction, and so, when it comes to PvP, where critical chance and critical damage is more valuable, I’m much less equipped to do so with my main loadout.

  • I’ve found that the best way to enjoy the Dark Zone now is to simply not collect any item drops (unless they’re exceedingly rare). With no need to extract items (and the attendant stress that extractions bring), it is much easier to focus on simply clearing landmarks and evade any rogue agents that may be present. At this point in time, I’ve become geared enough towards PvE that I can burn through elites and named enemies without any effort: soloing landmarks in the higher sectors of the Dark Zone is very straightforwards now, and I’ve run into groups who’ve expressed surprise at encountering a lone player in a recently-cleared landmark that had moments before, been marked as available on the map.

  • Here, I make my way to a supply drop after helping out with a manhunt, conferring a small cut of the bounty. When I first began, I struggled to clear the elites guarding supply drops, and wondered if tactical link would be needed to deal with the enemies if I were going solo. This is no longer the case, as I’ve enough firepower to melt through the elites. I’ve heard stories of opportunists allowing other players to fight the elites while they engage survivor link and claim the supplies for themselves. My approach to supply drops is pretty blasé, and if another agent steals a supply drop I’m working on, so be it.

  • I admit that it’s become a bit more difficult as of late to match-make into legendary missions. I decided to give them a go for Onslaught, during which players have access to ammunition that deals burn, bleed and gas damage. Reloading allows one to switch the effect on the fly, and it is very effective to combine different effects together to control crowds of enemies. Here, I am fighting with three other players at Warrengate Power Plant. Notice that my weapon skins are quite plain compared to those of my teammates’: there’s a certain appeal about the desert tan colours, and for the most part, I run with simple skins to avoid standing out in the Dark Zone.

  • With this year’s E3 just a few days away, I look ahead into the future: The Division 2 was announced a few months ago, and a new trailer released earlier today, detailing the setting and showcasing the gameplay. When I first saw the footage for The Division from the 2013 E3, I was completely blown away by how beautiful everything looked. The launch version of The Division is vastly watered down, featuring fewer AR-type elements in its UI and also dialling back the visual fidelity to a considerable degree, but from a gameplay and content perspective, The Division was well worth playing through even though it may not look as impressive as what was shown in the E3. The new trailer for The Division 2 shows a very familiar game that looks like a straight upgrade from The Division. Things still look like they handle smoothly, but with a fresh coat of paint that hopefully will retain the AR-esque elements.

  • I can accept that this year’s E3 reveal for The Division 2 will might be light years ahead of the product that will be shipped to consumers from a graphics perspective. In today’s gameplay trailer, it is revealed that Washington DC will be the setting. The Division‘s Manhattan is beautifully rendered and highly authentic, but a sequel would become stale very quickly if it were to be set in New York again. I personally was hoping that The Division 2 would take us over to Asia: Hong Kong, Shanghai, Tokyo and Seoul would have provided an incredibly refreshing backdrop for a continuation. An Asian setting makes sense because at the end of The Division, Aaron Keener escaped with the means to continue manufacturing the Green Poison. However, DC is a logical choice: Keener had intended to bring the world to its knees, and taking out Washington would’ve been a very powerful move.

  • The Division 2 will be set in the summer, so I wonder if there will be more interesting outfits available for selection. Besides the fact that there’s a (mostly) new setting, what would get me excited about The Division 2 would be the immediate inclusion of the same end-game content we now have in The Division 1.8.1: having gear-sets and exotics to work towards through ridiculously difficult missions, world-tiers to incentivise collecting better gear, high value targets to hunt, resistance to provide waves of enemies for testing one’s mettle and Global Events, plus the thrills of a Dark Zone would provide plenty of content for a newly-launched The Division 2, such that the most dedicated of players would not run out of things to do after hitting the level cap.

  • If The Division 2 launched with the same content as what is available in The Division 1.8.1’s base game, was set in an East Asian city and handles as smoothly as The Division does now (both from a gameplay and connectivity standpoint), it would be an easy day-one purchase for me. Given my experience with The Division, I would not hesitate to buy The Division 2 at full price – I’ve put in 135 hours at the time of writing into The Division, so I’m sure to get the bang for my buck if things turn out well for The Division 2. Here in my legendary run, I square off against a Lieutenant Sasaki. Our team got wiped out on our first attempt, and we were close to being wiped a second time, but fortunately, I activated my recovery link, bringing everyone back to life.

  • During the Onslaught event, I played missions to unlock weekly caches, which have a guaranteed exotic. When I finished the legendary mission and the weekly assignment, I returned to the base of operations to open them. Opening the weekly cache was a bit disappointing, but opening exotic cache I got from playing the Warrengate mission landed me the MDR. I was thrilled: while the MDR does not line up with my preferred play-style (I run a four-piece Striker set with the Ninjabike backpack), I wanted to have an MDR so I could mix things up. The weapon also looks exceedingly sleek.

  • My first inclination was to give the MDR a whirl: with its slow firing rate and extended mags, the MDR can take out entire groups of enemies before needing a reload. While somewhat lacking in stability, having good weapon attachments can make the weapon’s recoil more manageable. The weapon is definitely fun to use: handling like a cross between a marksman rifle and assault rifle, it burns through armour and allows for headshots to be scored. Bonus damage from the status effects in Onslaught makes the MDR remarkably effective, although its lower rate of fire makes the MDR a decidedly inferior weapon for close-quarters combat.

  • For any serious engagement in a legendary mission, the Urban MDR would not be my choice of weapon: my LVOA-C and The House have proven effective beyond any other weapon combination, so I’ve not looked back. However, with the myriad of ways to play The Division, it’s always fun to equip different gear-sets and weapons to give them a go. Here, I run through a vividly-lit alley close to the Base of Operations after blowing apart the open-world named elite and his entourage here: the warm, golden light brings to mind the moods of the Christmas season.

  • I figured the time was high for me to try out the Camp Clinton area of Manhattan – this was an area that I had previously not explored, but now that I had a setup that worked for me, and all of the exotic weapons that I’d sought to collect, I was properly outfitted to deal with the enemies here. There are encounter-style missions known as Alerts; coming in five varieties, they give Division Tech, equipment and target intel when completed. They’re quite fun to complete, but one challenge about the West Side Piers are that there is no in-fighting among the enemies.

  • Consequently, random groups of standard-type enemies can lay waste to unsuspecting players: I’ve never died to NPCs outside of mission areas until now, and for this reason, exploring the West Side Piers offers a thrill that is absent from other parts of Manhattan. As an end-game section of The Division to explore, the Division Tech earned from doing Alerts here is immensely useful towards optimising gear. I’ve burned through my Division Tech trying to improve gear pieces with reasonable configurations on them, and the updates are quite noticeable: enemies melt slightly faster, and I recover more quickly.

  • The USS Intrepid Carrier Museum can be seen here; the original USS CV-11 Intrepid was commissioned in 1943 and participated in several battles in the Pacific Theatre. After the Second World War, Intrepid was decommissioned, modernised and then recommissioned. Among its most noteworthy operations were the recovery of space capsules from the fledgling American space programme and in 1974, was decommissioned once again. It became a museum ship in 1984, and today, is a well-known destination in New York: the museum ship featured in National Treasure as a location where Ben Gates evades the FBI with help from rogue treasure hunters.

  • When I travelled to New York in 2011, I had a chance to visit the USS Intrepid for myself; Manhattan is a very active and busy place that gives Hong Kong a run for its money, and the traffic jams here are legendary. The Division really succeeds in capturing the strange sense of quiet following the Dollar Flu pandemic, and this is one of the main reasons why I ended up getting The Division despite having sat on the decision for nearly two years. I was dissuaded by the fact that the game did not have much in the way of end-game content, but by the time Patch 1.8 was introduced, The Division had much more to do even in the absence of the additional DLC content.

  • Having a good amount of armour destruction allowed me to survive a ways into each of the resistance missions as a solo player. These endless missions are a fantastic test of one’s gear and setup: with my four-piece Striker set, augmented by the use of a Ninja Bike backpack that lets me gain the ammunition bonus of the Lone Star set and the improved resilience against elite enemies from the D3-FNC build, I’m balanced to deal damage, absorb it from tougher enemies and also can operate on my own for longer before running out of ammunition.

  • With the proper setup, one can reach the tier two resistance caches on their own. There was a bug where one could get tier five equipment from caches earned from playing resistance on tier one difficulty if one switched back to tier five before opening them, but this particular issue has been rectified now. I’ve still yet to learn the waves and patterns of the resistance mode, having only spent about an hour experimenting with the different maps and their layouts: there are some tricks to improve one’s performance and make the most of the SHD tech pickups, which are used to unlock new areas, supply crates and gear caches, but with The Division nearing the end of its lifespan, I’m not too sure if it’ll be worthwhile to put too much time into things.

  • My original interest in the resistance missions were that they were said to be a fantastic place to farm for classified and exotic gear. However, considering the amount of time it takes to get to them, I feel that for folks who do not have any of the DLC, playing through legendary missions, weekly assignments and entering the Dark Zone is the more efficient route for getting gear. When available, Global Events are unmatched for collecting classified gear items.

  • In fact, looking through old conversations out there about The Division, I’ve noted that in older patches, classified and exotics were extremely rare. They’re not easy to obtain for a reason, but in my experiences, I’ve managed to amass a sizeable collection of exotics and have made some progress in collecting classified gear pieces as a predominantly solo player who occasionally teams up with others to complete legendary missions. That I’ve managed to do so is no small feat, and I’m a bit surprised that I was able to get this much milage out of The Division. This is what motivates the page quote: I recall that early in The Division, players were having trouble getting their gear scores up.

  • Having now done everything within the base game for The Division (except for the Incursions), one wonders if I have any plans to buy the DLCs. The answer is no: while it would open up new game modes to explore, most of these are dependent on teamwork for an optimal experience. The only DLC that would work for me is Underground, since this can be soloed, but I’ve heard that it’s also very repetitive in nature. Rolling for 15 CAD at full price, I’ve seen sale prices bring it down to 4.50 CAD. If the next Steam Sale offers a comparable discount, I might just take the plunge and pick it up.

  • Of course, for the next Steam Summer Sale (which begins in eleven days), my eyes are on Far Cry 5. While the discounts won’t likely be too substantial, considering the strong sales numbers, if I can get a price reduction closer to forty percent off, then I will pick up the game. Otherwise, I can hold off: I’ve heard that Far Cry 5 handles similarly to its predecessors from a gameplay perspective, but my main interest in the game was its setting, and this isn’t something I feel like I’ll be missing out on too much should I decide to wait for a better sale. While Far Cry 5 might be a game I’m on the fence about, this past weekend has also seen the release of new Battlefield V trailers and gameplay footage from EA Play.

  • The resistance modes were the first place where I encountered drones, which come in two types. Standard types have a red targetting laser, and shock drones have a blue laser. I’m not particularly fond of the latter, as they can leave players exposed to other attacks. Fortunately, with their weak armour and health, they can be disposed of fairly quickly.

  • In the footage of Battlefield V, I’ve seen the new fortification and team play mechanics, new maps and weapons, as well as the new UI. Fortification will provide a new way to counteract destruction, and seeing destruction play such an instrumental role in a Battlefield title means an increased emphasis on teamwork and tactical play. The only maps we’ve seen so far are in Norway, but the snowy terrain and aurora look absolutely gorgeous. The War Stories will also be introduced over time, and without a premium model, the game looks like it will keep on giving after it is purchased. I expect that Battlefield V could perform very well even without Steam Summer Sale-type events, and having seen a proper bit of gameplay for it, my decision on Battlefield V will largely be determined by how smooth the netcode is at launch.

  • If Battlefield V‘s launch is at least as smooth as that of Battlefield 1‘s, then it will be a very easy decision as to whether I pick up the game shortly after launch. For now, we return to The Division, where I’ve been playing around with the MDR and my all-exotic loadout. Having had the chance to try out the all-exotic loadout, it is a satisfactory all-around setup where I sacrifice firearms damage for more skill power. While quite entertaining to use, with all of the different bonuses the pieces confer, it is not as specialised towards my personal play style, and so, I don’t use it for team-oriented missions. Conversely, running all exotics for hard main missions isn’t too bad: that the all-exotic loadout is balanced means that it’s versatile enough for one to handle most missions without too much difficulty.

  • At some point in the future, I aim to return to the West Side Pier by day to see what it looks like here. With a reasonably effective build and more or less, all the weapons that I was looking to acquire, I have a feeling that my days spent in The Division will be more exploration driven now: I’ve still to complete all of the encounters on the eastern side of Manhattan, for one, but now that my gear allows me some survivability, I’m not too worried about dying while running around and simply taking in the scenery, which looks fabulous. I’m running The Division at high settings at 1080p and have a consistent 60 FPS on my five-year-old setup (albeit a setup with an upgraded GPU from 2016), so one factor that will directly impact my decision to buy The Division 2 will simply be whether or not my machine can run it.

  • Here, I fight in the last of the resistance maps, set in an underground facility called the Powerhouse. So far, while I’m very excited about Battlefield V and look forwards to seeing just what The Division 2 entails, most of the anime community is completely disinterested in the innovation that these games have. Much like some are downright dismissing the titles I find noteworthy, I am of the opinion that Nintendo’s E3 showing is unlikely to be impressive for me: games like Super Smash Bros and Kingdom Hearts do not look to be pushing the envelope for the technology powering games.

  • I’ve noted that the posts here on The Division (or other gaming posts) are given a cooler reception relative to my anime posts. I’m rather aware that my entire reader base consists of fellow anime fans who may or may not share my interest in shooters, and I think that the average reader coming here is likely looking for analysis of themes, explanations of plot points and random remarks on various scenes for anime. However, while these posts seem to offer a limited return for the effort it takes to write them, I note that I write this blog for myself as well as for readers – this is an electronic journal of sorts for me, and I enjoy recalling my adventures in games as much as I do writing about anime. While we’re on the topic of this blog’s logistics, I’ve decided to disable comments for posts older than two years on the basis that 1) this reduces spam and 2) it would be somewhat disingenuous to discussing older posts with readers when I cannot fully recall the rationale for some of my thoughts.

  • With this being said, I’m more of an anime blog than a gaming blog, so the focus of things will always be more anime-oriented. We thus look ahead into remaining posts for June, which we are not even halfway through yet. I am certainly going to write about Amanchu! AdvanceComic Girls and Sword Art Online Alternative: Gun Gale Online. As well, I am planning a special set of posts for the summer solstice, and I am also considering doing another post for the Terrible Anime Challenge series. Finally, news has reached my ears that Harukana Receive is going to begin airing on Friday, July 6. I’m debating whether or not this series will get an episodic review for the present, but even if it does not get an episodic review, if there was one anime for the summer season I am writing about, it is this one: at the minimum, I will follow the same format for Amanchu! Advance for Harukana Receive.

  • With the MDR now in my arsenal, I’ve more or less collected all of the exotics that I’ve set out to acquire. This is the all-exotic loadout I’ve always dreamed of having, and with this done, I feel that I’ve gotten the fullest from my solo experience of The Division. I may occasionally return to mess around with the West Side Piers missions and Dark Zone, as well as to try my luck with weekly mission caches (getting a Bullfrog would be quite nice, even if it is extraneous), but I think for the present, I am in a position to take a bit of a break from farming for gear in The Division and focus my attention on other things. So, readers disappointed that I’m not writing more about anime will likely be less disappointed: besides the remaining shows of this season, and the other Terrible Anime Challenge on the table, I’ve finally finished AIR from Kyoto Animation. I will be writing about AIR, and as well, my copy of Kimi no Koe wo Todoketai has finally arrived: no promises yet, but I am going to try and watch this ahead of Canada Day.

When I returned to the terminal, I bought global event caches and got a Damascus, an exotic M9 pistol. Opening the weekly cache landed me Shortbow Championship pads, which I had a superior version of already and proceeded to scrap. I turned to the last item, the exotic cache I got from finishing Warrengate Power Plant, and opened it. Against all odds, I got the Urban MDR. Despite its low gear score of 258 and average talents (Focused and Commanding), I finally had an Urban MDR in my inventory. I re-calibrated it, replacing Commanding with Brutal. I subsequently optimised it so it would hit harder and then took the weapon out for a spin against the various open-world named elites, and the free-roaming enemies of the West Side Pier. With the effects from Onslaught active, it’s proven to be a fun romp: the weapon is very efficient with its ammunition, and when an extended magazine is equipped, one can go through multiple veterans or entire groups of standard enemies before needing a reload if their aim is true. While the MDR’s semi-automatic fire is not suitable for my preferred Striker setup (I run with the House and LVOA-C exclusively now for missions), and it is dependent on status effects to be at its most effective, the MDR is nonetheless a fun weapon to use even in the absence of a dedicated setup: it’s great for mixing things up and experiencing things a little differently. I’ve heard that this weapon is incredibly rare in The Division, and consequently, being able to get an Urban MDR on my last exotic cache was such a stroke of dumb luck that I can’t believe it. While I’m seemingly on a hot streak, maybe I ought to get into Kantai Collection, where I’m sure dumb luck will let me register for the game and maybe subsequently solo Kantai Collection‘s 6-5 events with the basic loadouts that would make veteran players salty.

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