The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games and life converge

Battlefield V: The Lynette Bishop Loadout, Operation Mercury, Killtastrophe, Rampage and a new Headshot Record

“Disappointment to a noble soul is what cold water is to burning metal; it strengthens, tempers, intensifies, but never destroys it.” —Eliza Tabor

The third Tides of War chapter to Battlefield V introduced a host of new weapons, and the first new map in over half a year: the map Mercury was added at the end of May, and portrays the Battle of Crete, during which the Germans mounted an airborne assault on the Greek island, which was under British occupation. The map itself is beautiful, with blue skies, turquoise waters, Greek-style houses and cliffs that encourage vertical gameplay. Besides a new map, six new weapons were also added. The medic class gains access to the bolt-action carbine weapons, which allows them to hang back and engage enemies at a medium range more effectively. In particular, the M28 con Tromboncino provides medics with a brand-new playstyle, where they can use the integral grenade launcher to damage vehicles. Similarly, the scout class also received two new weapon classes: the P08 Pistol Carbine is the first close-quarters weapon for the scout, bringing back the aggressive recon style gameplay that I was very fond of in earlier Battlefield titles, while the Boys AT Rifle is an immensely powerful weapon that, in addition to being able to decimate infantry, also gives the Scouts the ability to damage vehicles. The third chapter thus provides players with different options for their classes, and this in turn has helped with keeping things fresh, even though the development and release of new content has been at a snail’s pace: by this point in Battlefield 1‘s lifespan, the They Shall Not Pass DLC had released, introducing five new maps, a new tank and six new weapons. However, while things have been progressing very slowly, Battlefield V‘s roadmap for the months upcoming have revealed that the fourth Tides of War chapter will bring at six new maps to the table, including a re-imagining of Battlefield 3’s Operation Metro. Chapter five subsequently introduces the American Pacific and Imperial Japan factions, bringing players to the long-awaited Pacific Theatre. Iwo Jima and the M1 Garand rifle will be introduced, and this is particularly exciting.

Over the past six months, since I last wrote about Battlefield V‘s multiplayer, I’ve now reached the point where it costed me less than a dollar per hour to play Battlefield V, and I’m hovering around a KDR of 0.9, a considerable improvement relative to my performance in Battlefield 1. While Battlefield V‘s consistently failed to deliver on new maps, Tides of War and its weekly rewards have been sufficient incentive to return and complete assignments, encouraging replay. While I’m not particularly fond of the constant introduction of new game modes, and feel that playing the same maps have become very repetitive (DICE would be better served building new maps rather than adding game modes which have had insufficient testing and lack the same scale as conquest), the silver lining is that I’ve become very familiar with the maps, to the point where my performance has been of a consistently high standard. Map and weapon knowledge has allowed me to help my team out, top the scoreboards and generally have a good time while attempting each of the weekly assignments. With the improvement in familiarity comes a few new personal bests. The close-quarters chaos of Outpost allowed me to score a killtastrophe (a multi-kill of eight, equivalent to killing 8 opponents within 4 seconds of each previous kill in Halo 3). The Valentine Archer tank, introduced during the second Tides of War chapter, has been my go-to vehicle. Despite its lack of a rotating turret, the Archer’s loadout is incredibly effective against infantry and vehicles alike. I’ve gone on multiple 15-streaks with the Archer, and my current best is a 23-streak (equivalent to Halo 2’s Rampage). Knowing the weapons better have allowed me to best my headshot record by one metre using the Lee-Endfield No. 4 Mk. I — my headshot record is now 258 metres, up from 257. While the maps have not been something to write home about, new weapons also have kept things satisfactorily enjoyable: the P08 and Boys AT Rifle are especially fun, adding a new dimension to the scout class.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • I open this post up with a killtactular I got while operating a Tiger I against a loaded transport. During my time with the Tides of War, I found my skills tested not against other players, but with the assignment requirements themselves. Most challenging was the assignment to unlock the StuG IV, which entailed using a passenger gun to kill enemies while attacking an objective – I ended up finishing this assignment and grabbing my StuG IV (an upgrade the the StuG III that the history team of Girls und Panzer operate) before DICE modified the assignment and accidentally locked people out of it.

  • The De Lisle Carbine is one of the few suppressed weapons in Battlefield V, and while it marks the first time that the medics got access to something new, the weapon is also remarkably difficult to use, being ineffectual at close quarters, and demanding superb aim to land medium range shots. However, in offering something new to the medic class, Battlefield V shows that with the right content, the game has the potential to last quite a while.

  • While the StuG IV was an interesting vehicle, the Valentine Archer is perhaps the most overpowered vehicle in the game, even following the patch. Before, with the right specialisations, the Archer could hold a total of 50 rounds: 40 standard shells for its QF 17PDR and an additional ten APDS rounds. Combined with a high mobility, the Archer becomes the perfect tank for delivering an incredible volume of fire downrange – while limited by the fact that it has no rotating turret, the vehicle has extreme endurance, and I had no difficulty in going on long the equivalent of a Running Riot even with the base Archer. So effective is the Archer that I’ve been accused of cheating while using it: when used as a long-range solution, the Archer is untouchable.

  • The longest killstreak I’ve gone on is with the Archer: during a match, I ended up going 23-0 with it, which is equivalent to Halo‘s “Rampage” killstreak. The Archer was subsequently nerfed to carry less ammunition, but even then, it remains terrifyingly powerful. Despite the updated Archer carrying a maximum of 32 shells for the QF 17PDR for a total of 42 rounds, down from its original 50, the Archer still has exceptional endurance in combat. For my part, I play the Archer as a sniper: if one is assured some security from the rear and flanks, no other tank comes close to it in performance.

  • After putting in over eighty hours into Battlefield V, it’s become apparent that cheating is a much greater issue here than it has been with previous titles: low level players with scores and KD-ratios that far exceed what is feasible in-game very are encountered frequently. Low levels translate to less time spent learning weapon patterns and reduced map knowledge, so doing unrealistically well is an indicator I am dealing with someone who is employing some sort of client-side modifications. While I ordinarily quit out of games with such players, the Tides of War assignments often require that I stay to completion, which makes for a frustrating experience. Conversely, in game where there are no cheaters, I perform modestly well.

  • The Boys AT Rifle was the most welcome addition to Battlefield V thus far: I’ve long desired to run with the Lynette Bishop loadout in Battlefield, and after unlocking this gun, immediately set about putting it to the test. With a fire rate of 10 RMP, the Boys AT Rifle fired a 13.9 mm round at 747 m/s in real life, and could punch through up to 23.2 mm of armour at 91.44 meters. The weapon was initially effective against lighter tanks, but improvements in German armour meant the Boys AT Rifle was no longer as useful, and eventually became replaced by the PIAT. In Battlefield V, the Boys AT Rifle fires at 22 RPM and has a muzzle velocity of 400 m/s, but can be upgraded to fire at 26 RPM and rounds that travel at 460 m/s.

  • In Battlefield V, the Boys AT Rifle is useless against tanks, can deal reasonable damage to light vehicles (a few shots will destroy them) and is obscenely powerful against infantry under 100 metres, being able to one shot anyone with a body shot. To run the most authentic Lynette loadout possible, I opted to equip the machined bolt to improve the Boys AT Rifle’s firing rate: Lynette typically uses magic to increase her Boys AT Rifle’s fire rate, as well as to stablise her shots and aim at longer distances. Since magic isn’t a feature in Battlefield V, I decided that a good set of optics would need to replace Lynette’s ability to resolve targets at great distances.

  • One of my favourite moments with the Boys AT Rifle is getting a double kill with one shot on enemies in a narrow street in Rotterdam. Getting kills with the weapon is incredibly satisfying. While capable of downing infantry in one shot under 100 metres, the Boys AT Rifle is balanced by the fact that it has a very slow muzzle velocity, low firing rate and demands a bipod to operate accurately. Setting the weapon up is a challenge and leaves one exposed: in exchange for its great power, there are concessions that must be made. As such, I find that the Boys AT Rifle is well-balanced, and not overpowered. In the right situation, it is devastating, but not sufficiently so as to change the outcome of a game. I believe that an issue where the Boys AT Rifle had inappropriately good hip-fire accuracy has since been addressed.

  • Set on Crete, Mercury is the first new map to grace Battlefield V since Panzerstorm came out back in December. Filled with cliffs and set alongside the coasts of Crete on the Mediterranean, Mercury is a beautiful map that offers a brand-new atmosphere to Battlefield V. My first kill on the map was with the Panzer IV Ausf. H, Miho’s preferred tank as Girls und Panzer progressed: the Ausf. D configuration was originally intended for an anti-infantry role. On the topic of Girls und Panzer, it appears that overseas viewers have begun flying over to Japan for Das Finale‘s second part, and if what I’m hearing is to be believed, at least one individual intends to do this for the remaining four parts. I’ve mentioned this numerous times that I don’t get this behaviour, since the payoffs of seeing a film ahead of everyone else are not worth the price it takes for such an endeavour.

  • I’ve always been practically-minded about these things: assuming a cost of around 2500 CAD (including flights, ground transportation, accommodations, food and the movie ticket itself), seeing all six parts of Girls und Panzer: Das Finale would cost 15000 CAD. I get that there are people who are dedicated to Girls und Panzer, but spending this much money just to see a military-moé series ahead of everyone else cannot be considered wise, especially since watching the movie in theatres does not allow one the option of taking high-resolution screenshots and generating interesting discussions as one might see here. Instead of attempting to match the folly that some might have, I’ll take a more practical route and for the present, focus on enjoying Battlefield V and the other things in the now. Here, I run with the Bren: Perrine H. Clostermann’s weapon of choice, the slow-firing and hard-hitting Bren has quickly become my favourite LMG of Battlefield V for its reliability at medium ranges.

  • The turquoise waters off the coast of Crete are stunning, and give way to the verdant cliffs players fight on. The map greatly resembles Battlefield 1‘s Achi Baba, which was located on Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula. However, whereas Achi Baba is located inland and features narrow canyons, rocky hills and ruins, Mercury has villages and a spectacular view of the water. Battlefield V is definitely more colourful than its predecessor, but has had very little opportunity to show off what the Frostbite Engine is capable of primarily because of its limited map selection.

  • Besides a lack of maps, every patch of Battlefield V also introduced a series of unusual bugs that negatively impacted performance and user experience. This aspect of Battlefield V makes no sense: DICE has already proven that the Frostbite Engine is capable of excellent net code, managing 64 players seamlessly and ensuring hit detection is accurately reported. As such, when things like TTD are still a problem in Battlefield V, I cannot help but wonder if core aspects of the game will be improved; while my experiences have been reasonably smooth, that DICE continues to encounter these problems is not encouraging.

  • Having reached rank twenty for the medic, I finally unlocked the M1928A1 Thompson Submachine Gun. Better known as the Tommy Gun, this weapon was an iconic part of American history, known for its use by bootleggers during the Prohibition era. The basic Thompson has a 20-round stick magazine and handles similar to the Suomi, but once upgraded with its 50-round drum magazine, the weapon becomes a powerhouse weapon for the medic.

  • Its effectiveness has quickly made the Thompson my favourite of the medic weapons, and rendered the journey to reach rank twenty worth it. Up until now, I predominantly ran the MP-40 and ZK-383: the former is reliable and consistent, while the latter packs a punch and is suited for slightly longer ranges thanks to its bipod. While the medic class had started Battlefield V as an ineffectual one, updates to submachine gun performance and access to weapon specialisations have come together to make the class much more viable.

  • Addition of the M28 con Tromboncino (an upgraded version of Battlefield 1‘s M91 Carcano Carbine) to the medic class finally provides one with the option of medium-range combat. The bolt-action carbines for the medic class exchange raw damage, range and accuracy of the bolt-action rifles for a higher firing rate; they have a straight-pull bolt, and so, one can continue firing without zooming out, making it possible to land follow-up shots more effectively.

  • Lacking the same limitations as the De Lisle Carbine, the M28 con Tromboncino is the first proper medium-range weapon for the medic, and it is a great choice for maps that have wide open spaces. While medics can typically get around by making use of smoke and relying on their teammates to provide return fire at range, there are situations where being able to reliably hit back is valuable.

  • The M28 con Tromboncino also has one additional feature that makes it an attractive weapon: it possesses an integral grenade launcher that was originally intended to extend the firepower infantry could carry without relying on mortar support. In Battlefield V, the integral grenade launcher handles similarly to the support class’ AT grenade pistol, and gives medics the option of engaging light vehicles, as well as discouraging tanks. Here, I managed to destroy a tank that was low on health using the M28 con Tromboncino’s grenades.

  • Outpost is the latest game mode to join Battlefield V, and while it is focused on smaller-scale combat, I feel that the radio tower construction/destruction mechanic adds a bit more engagement to capturing points: one must actively build or destroy a radio tower to control a point. The mode was surprisingly fun, forcing a different play style compared to standard conquest, and the aggregation of players on a capture point also makes reinforcements highly useful. My original wish for more reinforcements was realised: smoke barrage and artillery strike were added to the game during the second chapter, and it appears that spotting aircraft and flamethrowers could make their way into the main game in the future.

  • All that’s left would be a 4-player strategic bomber like the B-29 that can deal massive damage and provide several gun turrets similar to Call of Duty WWII‘s B-17 Ball turret kill-streak. The tradeoff would be that the B-29 flies extremely slowly and would be vulnerable to AA guns, as well as enemy aircraft. here, I score a headshot with the Gewehr M.95, a weapon with a fast muzzle velocity. The headshot I refer to in this post’s title was actually scored on Arras with the Lee-Endfield No. 4 Mk. I, where I landed a particularly lucky shot from the church tower close to the B-point on a player standing at the C-point. Considering the difficulty of sniping in Battlefield V compared to its predecessors, I’d say that this isn’t too shabby a feat.

  • My most impressive moment in Battlefield V actually comes a few days ago, after the third Tides of War chapter ended. I was messing around on Arras and had gone on a short kill-streak with the Valentine Archer, but was unceremoniously killed by a player who got lucky with the sticky dynamite. Spawning back in close to where I’d died, I noticed that the enemy team had begun swarming the A point and immediately called in a JB-2 rocket. When it struck, I got eight kills simultaneously, which is counted as a Killtastrophe in Halo 3.  The skill-based aspects of Battlefield V means that I’ve actually improved much more quickly than I did with Battlefield 1, and with this in mind, while Battlefield V had been off to a weak start, the recent announcements about chapter four in Tides of War, and confirmation of the Pacific Theatre has me very excited. Despite my disappointments, I remain optimistic that DICE will turn Battlefield V into a superbly enjoyable title, much as they had for Battlefield 3Battlefield 4 and Battlefield 1 before it.

For the past while, I’ve thus been running the Lynette Bishop loadout: the addition of the Boys AT Rifle into the game has finally made it possible for me to run around as my favourite Witch of the 501st, and it has been quite exhilarating to make the Boys AT Rifle work. Blessed with the ability to one-hit-kill anyone from under 100 metres owing to its .55 Boys ammunition, the Boys AT Rifle is constrained by low muzzle velocity, fire rate and the fact that its bipod must be deployed for it to be effective. For the most part, since I don’t happen to have magic that allows me to use the Boys AT Rifle the same way Lynette does, I need to place myself strategically to make the weapon work. However, when positioning is good, the Boys AT Rifle is a beast: to match Lynette’s abilities, I run the Boys AT Rifle with Slings and Swivels (faster weapon draw), flashless propellant (reduces muzzle flash), the machined bolt (increases firing rate) and high velocity bullets. While its damage makes it a terrifying weapon to square off against, the Boys AT Rifle’s limitations means that it takes a bit of skill and patience to properly wield the weapon: missing a shot is unforgiving, and having the bipod deployed makes one vulnerable to counter-snipers. On the whole, however, the Boys AT Rifle has been a fun weapon to use, and Lynette’s loadout is, when played correctly, a viable one in Battlefield V. The upcoming Tides of War chapters look to bring even more iconic weapons and vehicles into Battlefield V, and so, while it is disappointing to see that Battlefield V has remained buggy and lacking in content, the future for the title remains quite encouraging: Battlefield V could still very well become an incredible World War Two shooter, and the Pacific Theatre definitely looks to be helping the game along. If a new elite soldier wielding a katana is introduced in the Pacific Theatre chapter, I would be tempted to drop additional coin for this, as it would allow me to run the Mio Sakamoto loadout.

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