The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

Masterpiece Anime Showcase: The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, The Implications of Choice and Messages of Appreciation for the Decade’s Final Christmas

“Of course it was fun, and I loved every minute of it! Don’t go asking me stupid questions that are so obvious! You’d have to be crazy to think it wasn’t fun! Only the biggest idiot in the world would say it wasn’t fun if they were asked! They’d be thirty times more dense than Haruhi! Aliens, time travellers, and ESP? One’s enough, but I got to hang out with all three! Then there’s Haruhi, who’s got the craziest power of them all! And then there’s all these other mysterious powers sprinkled all over the place! How could I not find all this stuff fun? Ask me as many times as you want and my answer won’t change! Of course I do…I guess that’s it. The other way is definitely better. Having a world like this just doesn’t feel right.” –Kyon

In week leading up to Christmas, Haruhi plans a hot pot party for the SOS Brigade. However, when Kyon wakes up on December 18, he finds that his reality has been altered: besides Haruhi and Itsuki’s noticeable absence, Ryōko’s reappearance and Mikuru failing to recognise him, there is no SOS Brigade in this world. Yuki is an ordinary girl who is in the literature club, and besides Kyon, no one appears to know anything about the sudden, unexpected transition. While weighing his options in the former SOS Brigade club room and spending time with the alternate Yuki, Kyon finds a clue in the form of a bookmark, which informs him that he is to gather keys, critical personnel to unlock a special program. During this time, Kyon comes to know the alternate Yuki better; she’s rather happy Kyon’s joined the literature club. When Taniguchi informs Kyon that Haruhi attends the prestigious high school, Kyon sets off to find her. The alternate Haruhi is less-than-pleased to see him, but he reveals that he is “John Smith”. Haruhi’s anger and confusion turns to excitement, and Itsuki postulates that Kyon’s timeline must have diverged on December 18. Haruhi, now convinced by Kyon’s explanation, decides to gather up the former members of the SOS Bridage, and with everyone present, Kyon executes the program Yuki had left him. Upon running this program, Kyon returns to the Tanabata three years previously, where he meets the older Mikuru and past Yuki, who informs him that he must find the individual who triggered the change in the world and inject them with a special program. Returning to the present, Kyon realises that the culprit is none other than Yuki herself: having grown to love Kyon in her own way, she used Haruhi’s abilities to create an alternate reality and give Kyon a fair choice: an ordinary world where he would spend his future with her, or a disruptive but interesting world with Haruhi. Kyon chooses his original world, feeling that the adventure and excitement far outweighs his annoyance with Haruhi and her boundless energy. He prepares to hit Yuki with the program, but ends up stabbed by Ryōko. Kyon is ultimately rescued by his future self, Yuki and Mikuru: his world fades to black, and he awakens in a hospital. Itsuki is present and states that he’d fallen down the steps at school. Later that evening, he meets Yuki on the hospital’s veranda, and reassures her that if the Data Integration Thought Entity should seek to punish her, he can influence Haruhi to blink them out of existence. Kyon is discharged from hospital, and despite knowing he will now have to return back in time to save himself, he will first enjoy and make the most of Haruhi’s hot pot party with her and the others.

The theatrical adaptation of the fourth volume of the Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya light novels ended up being a veritable masterpiece, an order of magnitude more engaging and meaningful than was present within the first two seasons. The reason for this is because The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya‘s main narrative, contrasting the experimental, unorthodox execution of the regular series that emphasised fun and adventure over a central theme, possessed a clear and unexpectedly moving challenge for Kyon. Throughout the TV series, Kyon is presented as being exasperated, impatient with Haruhi and her antics, wishing nothing more than to live an ordinary life. However, when his world is suddenly wrested from him, the colourlessness of this new world forces him to re-evaluate what Haruhi means to him. By seeing a world without Haruhi, Kyon now has seen both sides of the coin, and with it, is able to make a choice: he ultimately chooses the bookmark (representing his old world) over the club application form (representing a world where he’d never met Haruhi early on), and in doing so, shows to viewers that in spite of all his complaints and gripes about being roped into some random adventure or misadventure with Haruhi, he’s also come to enjoy the attendant experiences that he spends with everyone. The decision, as Kyon puts it, is obvious: a world with Haruhi and the SOS Brigade is much more exciting to live in, and while the downs hit harder, the ups are more exhilarating and more rewarding, as well. The film therefore suggest that one’s choices are their own, to be made only when one is sufficiently informed of the different outcomes of a given decision, and in having Kyon electing to continue his adventures with Haruhi and the SOS Brigade, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya subtly suggests that it is preferable to live a life of excitement and seek adventure even if suffering or pain may accompany it, since the resultant experience leaves one all the stronger for it.

The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya could have been set any time of the year, but instead, the week leading up to Christmas is selected for the story’s timeframe. Christmas is traditionally a time of celebration and togetherness: a time when people would put the brakes on their everyday routines and gear up to spend time with those important to them. In Japan, Christmas is also celebrated similarly to Valentine’s Day. By dropping Kyon into an alternate reality close to Christmas, Kyon is now doubly stressed from his experiences: in a time where people begin to wind down, Kyon frantically searches for a solution to his predicament. By prompting Kyon to figure out his situation prior to Christmas and Haruhi’s hot pot party increases the urgency in the film, captivating audiences to follow Kyon. Besides compelling viewers to keep up, setting the film close to Christmas also has one other critical effect on its message. Kyon’s search for the answers, even as he spends time in this parallel universe, leads him to appreciate his old life. The contrast between the new world where Haruhi’s presence is diminished, versus the world where Haruhi dominates, makes evident the idea that individuals may not always appreciate what they have until it is gone. This is the theme in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya; despite the simplicity of the message, the film elegantly captures it into a very vivid portrayal that transforms into a story of self-discovery and appreciation of what one has. The choice to set this during Christmas, then, drives the notion that Christmas is also a time of gratitude, and of counting one’s blessings. Although Kyon may be reluctant to openly admit it, he very much enjoys Haruhi and the SOS Brigade’s company in spite of the wild adventures they’ve pushed him through. There are subtle parallels between The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya and Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol in that both Scrooge and Kyon, through a series of supernatural encounters, are given a new perspective on life and thus, come out more appreciative and grateful for what they have.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • When The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya released, I was just finishing up my second year of my undergraduate program and had gone through the likes of K-On! and Lucky Star, having had my curiosity piqued by Kyoto Animation’s work, I decided to give The Melancholy of Suzumiya Haruhi a go despite my initial reservations: I normally don’t watch a series on the basis of community reception alone, but a classmate of mine had a keen interest in K-On!Lucky Star and The Melancholy of Suzumiya Haruhi, so I decided to check it out and see what all of the commotion was about.

  • The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya opens with Haruhi planning the SOS Brigade’s Christmas party, which immediately re-establishes the tone: while Kyon is typically exasperated by Haruhi’s grandiose (and often unfeasible) plans, he does his best to accommodate a scaled-down version that satisfies Haruhi’s wishes while at once being somewhat plausible to put together. This dynamic between Kyon and Haruhi was the driving force throughout much of the TV series, and seeing it return in the film’s opening serves to remind viewers of what Kyon thinks of Haruhi and her antics on a typical day.

  • Thus, having made my way through the TV series, I finally reached the movie. At this point in the summer, I was a few weeks into building an agent-based flow model with the in-house game engine and had settled into my work, so in the late afternoons, after my hours had ended, I would watch anime on an iPad before heading home. This was back when the second generation iPad had released, and while said iPad would become my workhorse throughout my undergraduate programme, it started its journey as a tablet for anime.

  • I admit that I was not a fan of Haruhi when the series came out. Over ten years after The Melancholy of Suzumiya Haruhi was released to the world, the countless internet memes remain stale and jejune, but Haruhi’s high-energy and bossy personality has grown on me quite a bit – she brings joy into the mundane, and while she may not always be aware of it, is the cause of many of the TV series’ supernatural phenomenon.

  • When Kyon returns to school the next day, he finds his would completely changed: the shock of it causes Kyon to act irrationally, in a panic. His reaction is quite understandable considering how dramatic the changes are, and his reaction is actually far more reserved than would be expected of someone who was dropped into an alternate dimension. Although Kyon is initially disoriented, his rational mind soon kicks in, and he decides to see if there are any constants in this new world that carried over from his old world. This decision sets in motion the events of Kyon’s return to his old world.

  • The highlight in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya is the human Yuki: unlike the incarnation of Yuki we’d seen so far, Yuki in the alternate world is simply a shy girl who loves books, and initially is rather overwhelmed by Kyon’s forcefulness. Once the initial shock of Kyon bursting into the club room wears off, she attempts to recruit him for the literature club. Kyon’s only intention is to search for any clues in the room about his current situation, and he eventually manages to find a bookmark that provides him with instructions on how to restore his old world.

  • The human Yuki ends up forming the basis for The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan, a spin-off manga that supposes that this world was the world than Kyon desired. While not well-received by numerous fans of the Haruhi franchise, I personally found great value and enjoyment in The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan, as it shows Kyon as he would have been prior to meeting Haruhi. This story similarly sees Yuki try to keep the literature club alive, and with the combined efforts from Kyon and Ryōko, the club does end up doing quite well.

  • I would imagine that a part of the cold reception towards The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan was a consequence of die-hard fans wanting a continuation of The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, and instead of the long-anticipated continuation, fans instead got a low-profile spin-off that did not add to the original series. Thus, these individuals were willing to overlook that Yuki and Kyon’s relationship developed in an entirely natural manner, and both individuals mature greatly as the manga progressed: the manga itself is excellent and is one of the few series I’ve bought in full. I normally don’t buy manga series unless they are exceptionally enjoyable, speaking to The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan‘s high quality.

  • In this alternate world, the lighting is subdued, with a grey-scale palette dominating all of the scenes while Kyon is at school. Far more than any other studio, Kyoto Animation masterfully makes use of colours and lighting to paint an incredibly vivid and detailed view of the characters’ emotions in a scene. Their technical excellence cannot be understated, and in an industry that is so demanding that corners are sometimes cut, Kyoto Animation’s commitment to excellence makes them stand out as a superior studio. The arson incident at Kyoto Animation earlier this year was a devastating one, an unfortunate event resulting from an individual whose mind was filled with malice and hate when he perpetuated his actions.

  • It’s been five months since the fire at their studios, and the losses are still being felt at present. However, the studio’s president has also resolved on recovery. I naturally will continue to support their works. Back in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, Mikuru does not recognise Kyon, and Tsuruya, ordinarily friendly to Kyon, is openly hostile to him. This drives home the fact that Kyon’s world has changed considerably, and with the days counting down, Kyon must work to figure out what the original Yuki’s puzzle meant.

  • While determining what the “keys” that Yuki refer to are (they have nothing to do with unique identifiers that are used to quickly and efficiently retrieve data from storage), Kyon spends more time with the new Yuki, quickly discovering that she has a keen interest in books and therefore had a legitimate reason for being in the literature club. The literature club room stands in the exact same spot as the SOS Brigade’s club room, and is conveniently equipped with a computer that, while old, is still operational.

  • Yuki is pitifully shy in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, although with Kyon’s appearance, she does begin taking the initiative and brings him over to her apartment. Kyon is initially reluctant to stay, and this reluctance turns into a desire to leave when Ryōko shows up. In The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, Ryōko is Yuki’s best friend and very protective of her; these traits carry over into The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan, where Ryōko acts as a guardian of sorts for Yuki. This spin-off manga definitely had its own merits and while starting its journey carrying the same sense of gentle longing that The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya had, the story ends up having Yuki become more confident and independent as she begins to get closer to and eventually, go out with Kyon.

  • Kyon makes to decline Ryōko’s invitation to dinner, but is surprised when Yuki pulls on his sleeve, signalling her want for him to stay over for dinner. I personally felt that The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan adds more value to The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, as it gives insight into what sorts of things that Yuki herself would have wanted to experience with Kyon. By knowing the path that Yuki ended up taking, it makes the thought process that the Yuki seen here took towards creating a new world to give herself and Haruhi an even shot even more poignant, showing the extent of Yuki’s feelings for Kyon and the lengths she would go to seek an answer for herself.

  • While Nagato tugging on Kyon’s sleeve might’ve been the boldest she’s been all movie so far, viewers are further treated to a moment as rare as a blue moon: after dinner, Kyon asks Yuki to see if it’s alright for him to swing by the clubroom again the next day, and Yuki’s resulting smile is positively dazzling. This marks the first time that Yuki’s smiled at all anywhere in either The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, and The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya: I’m told that from fan reactions, this single moment alone made the movie worth watching. Such moments do not make or break movies for me, but I do admit that Yuki’s smile is pleasant and the movie’s setup allows us to see other sides of Yuki’s character.

  • When Kyon learns that Haruhi exists, he rushes off to the Kōyōen School, an elite academy that this Haruhi is attending. She is shocked and disgusted that Kyon appears to know so much about her and proceeds to give him a physical beating, but Kyon stops the melee by revealing his identity as the “John Smith” of several years previously. Haruhi is surprised that anyone could’ve known about the incident, and immediately faints.

  • In a world where Kyon and Haruhi had not met, Haruhi is a much more austere person, although her bold and forceful tendencies remain. The incidental piece that plays when Kyon rushes off to Kōyōen School, Suzumiya Haruhi no Tegakari (“A Sign of Haruhi Suzumiya”) begins playing. This piece remains one of my favourite songs on the soundtrack: with its use of woodwinds, the song greatly resembles Sim City 4‘s Wheels of Progress. The choice of instruments signifies that progress is happening, and for the first time in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, Kyon feels as though he’s got the faintest hint of what he needs to do. There are many incidental pieces in the film that would not sound out of place in Sim City 4: Kodoku Sekai no Hirogari (“Spread of a lonely world”) opens similarly with Sim City 4‘s Morning Commute.

  • When Haruhi comes to, she immediately takes interest in Kyon’s situation, listening attentively as Itsuki explains what may have happened with Kyon. Even in this alternative universe, where Itsuki has feelings for Haruhi, the fact that she’s immediately drawn into helping Kyon suggests to him that Haruhi has feelings for Kyon (regardless of how much the two try to deny it when asked). With the situation explained, Kyon begins to realise that his keys back to his old world were to gather the people who were in the SOS Brigade, and so, the group heads back to North High, so that Mikuru and Yuki can be assembled.

  • That Itsuki is quick to conclude that Haruhi loves Kyon shows that there doesn’t appear to be a timeline or reality that could keep them apart, further reinforcing the idea that Haruhi and Kyon complement one another extremely well. This was my favourite aspect about their dynamic: even though the two never enter a relationship in the animated adaptions, Haruhi’s boldness and energy pushes Kyon out of his comfort zone into experiences that he retrospectively enjoys, while Kyon’s down-to-earth, pragmatic approaches means that he’s always trying to reign back Haruhi’s outrageous plans, and in doing so, creates a slightly-scaled back but still-enjoyable experience for Haruhi.

  • After arriving at North High, Kyon lends Haruhi and Itsuki his gym clothes so the two blend in with the other North High students. Haruhi complies with Kyon’s request to wear a ponytail, and I admit that like Kyon, I’m fond of ponytails, as well. Haruhi’s aura changes noticeably, and she takes on many of the traits of her other self; within moments, she manages to find Mikuru and brings her to the literature club room.

  • Halo Reach released roughly seven months after The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya aired in theatres, and in a curious turn of fate, I experienced both the game and the film close to one another. There is definitely a nostalgia factor at play when I stop to contemplate things: on the day of the LAN party, after I’d arrived and wrapped up The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, one of my friends had arrived, and we now had enough people to play Halo Reach‘s co-op. Having spent most of the term attempting to survive organic chemistry and data structures, I didn’t pay attention to Halo Reach‘s campaign.

  • My friend, however, had known of the different missions and immediately requested that we play Long Night of Solace on co-op, which has Noble Team storm through Covenant forces attacking a Sabre facility and then help the UNSC fleet repel Covenant forces in orbit over Reach, before boarding a Covenant super-carrier. We made it on board the carrier before the remainder of my friends arrived, after which we threw burgers on a grill and then spent the rest of the evening blasting one another in MLG Team Slayer on Reflection. Halo Reach has now made it to PC, and my journey began on Chinese Winter Solstice.

  • Back in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, with all of the keys in one place, the old computer powers up, and the old Nagato Yuki’s program begins running, asking if Kyon is ready to go back. Without hesitation, Kyon hits enter to execute the program; he only stops briefly to apologise to this world’s Yuki for not being able to join the literature club with her. Nothing immediately happens, but in a few moments, Kyon’s world fades to black, and when he comes to, he finds himself in a hot, humid room.

  • It turns out that Kyon was sent back to the night of the Tanabata three years previously, which was in July. Unlike the washed-out, faded world without Haruhi, this hot summer night is portrayed using saturated shades of blue and other hues. This particular event is of great significance in The Melancholy of Suzumiya Haruhi, and in Japan, the festival is characterised by the writing of wishes on small pieces of paper and affixing them to a bamboo tree. The festival was presumably chosen to frame a time period where people make wishes, and so, when Kyon helps a younger Haruhi with her wishes, he inadvertently creates a future where he would meet her, and fulfill her desire for excitement.

  • Shortly after his arrival, Kyon encounters the older Mikuru, who knows of Kyon’s actions and sends him to Yuki’s apartment. With Yuki’s program, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya‘s story shares similarities with Seishun Buta Yarō wa Yumemiru Shōjo no Yume o Minai, which similarly used time travel as a part of its core story: both films are highly enjoyable extensions of a light novel story that have a much greater emotional impact than even their anime, and both use a causal loop to prevent the development of any paradoxes. In addition, both films force their male lead to make a difficult decision.

  • As such, it is not entirely unfounded when I say that both movies feel quite similar in their atmosphere and execution – that both Seishun Buta Yarō wa Yumemiru Shōjo no Yume o Minai and The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya manage to be so compelling is a testament to the strength in both movies’ narratives. Of course, both worlds also have their unique points: the former encapsulates the difficulties of youth with fanciful metaphors, while the latter is really about the joys of having fun and colourful people in one’s life.

  • Upon arriving in Nagato’s sparsely-furnished apartment, Kyon and the older Mikuru are given nanites to help them survive the next step of their operation. Yuki also provides Kyon with a dart gun that will immediately patch away the irregularities that will appear in her future self. These abnormalities, as Yuki considers them, are what would be known as emotions: these instinctive reactions to stimuli are a fundamental aspect of humanity, and while they can impediments, are also critically important towards the ability for people to work together

  • That Yuki’s begun developing this emergent property of having emotions, while humanising her character and making her more mature, also begins to affect her duties, hence her contingencies for this eventuality. When Kyon and the older Mikuru arrive in the world three years later, it is moments before Yuki changes the world. It’s a cold winter’s night, and Mikuru is completely unprepared for the brisk weather, so Kyon lends her his coat.

  • The sight of Yuki standing in the middle of the street on her own evokes a very melancholy, lonely feel that speaks volumes as to just how advanced her emotional intelligence had come since when Kyon first met her. Kyon readies his dart gun and chambers the round, but before he takes the shot, he considers the reasoning behind Yuki’s actions, as well as the justification for his own choices. Kyon quickly deduces that Yuki, having been exposed to the constantly exciting and fun environment that Haruhi and the SOS Brigade bring, as well as the changes that Kyon himself had wrought in Haruhi, began wondering what it would be like if she had gotten closer to him instead.

  • By providing viewers with a confirmation of their thoughts (or helping them to realign with what’s happening), Kyon’s monologues in the movie are immensely helpful. Whereas The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya had Kyon’s narration fill viewers in on what’s happening (similar to the TV series), Seishun Buta Yarō would delegate this particular task to Rio Futaba. In both cases, the narration starts out unreliable, but soon becomes more important as their respective stories advance. The attendant imagery in The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya speaks volumes to just how extensive and intense Yuki’s emotions had become.

  • The golden glow flooding the empty clubroom creates a sense of wistfulness: a similar light illuminated the world the day that I had arrived at my friend’s place for the LAN party and busied myself with finishing The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya after being informed that the others were a good half-hour away. For better or worse, the last light to afternoon of a late spring day is now something that irrevocably brings to mind the sort of loneliness and yearning that Yuki had: having been on her own this whole time, it was only natural that she began to entertain thoughts of getting closer to Kyon, who had been kind and understanding towards her despite discovering that she’d been of extraterrestrial origin.

  • For Kyon, the choice between his old world (the bookmark) and the alternative world (the club application) becomes tangibly represented towards the end of The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya. While the movie represents it as being a tough choice, Kyon’s actions throughout the film, and the fact that he immediately executes Yuki’s program without hesitation already foreshadows the choice that he would take.

  • The use of turnstiles in a train station shows that once Kyon’s made his decision, whatever that might be, his decision is to be final, and that Yuki would accept his choice (along with the ensuing consequences). Besides the use of colour and lighting, Kyoto Animation also excelled with strong use of symbolism within their anime films. Hibike! Euphonium similarly made extensive use of symbols, as do CLANNADKanon and other of their works. However, while some might take symbolism to mean that a film (or series) is necessarily intellectual, Kyoto Animation’s actual intent with symbols is to make tangible an idea that had only previously implied: in a Kyoto Animation work, once a symbol appears, an idea becomes explicitly clear.

  • The final hurdle Kyon faces internally lies within his own doubts: as much as he disliked Haruhi for forcing him into things he did not wish to participate in earlier on, her actions have also allowed him to make friends of everyone at the SOS Brigade. Thus, while he does indeed still think a peaceful life is something to enjoy, the more exciting world with Haruhi in it is the one he prefers, having seen what is possible when she’s around. The answer, then, is evident for Kyon, and he moves forwards without any hesitation. He readies his tool and remarks that he preferred Yuki without glasses, clearly indicating beyond any doubt that the other reality had no chance.

  • While the original world may have been a lot more exciting, one cannot help but feel bad for Yuki, whose feelings will be irrevocably denied. Nowhere in the soundtrack is this more evident than the piece Nagato Yuki no Kokoro ni Aru mono (“What’s In Yuki Nagato’s Heart”), an incredibly touching song whose use of strings captures the sense of yearning Yuki had for another life despite understanding that this was a path she could never take. If there was one song that could capture the entire essence of The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya from Yuki’s perspective, this would be it.

  • Before Kyon can fire on Yuki, a serrated blade cuts into his side: the original Ryōko had been a rogue agent who was not above cutting the Gordian Knot to get results faster. The Ryōko in the alternate reality (and in The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan) only retains the original’s ability to be intimidating, but otherwise lacks the same disregard for life: in the manga, Ryōko is seen to intimidate with a glance, and primarily does this to keep Yuki in line, but otherwise never even considers violence as an option.

  • Even as Kyon begins to bleed out, familiar figures appear and manage to complete his original objective of neutralising Yuki and preventing the world from being changed. From here, the timeline converges: Haruhi, Itsuki and the others saw Kyon to have fallen from a flight of steps after being pushed by an unknown entity. That everyone else believes Kyon to have fallen into a coma from falling from a stairwell makes The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya feel similar to Futurama‘s “The Sting”, where Leela fell into a coma after being stung by a space bee and believed Fry to be dead. While this same setup might have been a plausible explanation for things, the conversation that Kyon shares with Yuki indicates this is quite untrue.

  • Itsuki remarks that Haruhi never left his side, similar to how Fry remained by Leela until she’d reawakened. It’s a touching moment that further cements that Haruhi has feelings for Kyon in spite of herself, and Itsuki describes his thoughts on this devotion as being akin to jealousy. When Haruhi wakes up from her sleep, she immediately berates Kyon for having lost three days, although this is really just her way of expressing relief that Kyon is alright.

  • Ultimately, from Yuki’s perspective, the events of The Disappearance of Haruhi is a story of unrequited love: while Yuki may characterise it differently, her actions throughout the movie have been prompted by the most powerful and poorly-characterised human emotion of all. I have a separate post on the matter, but the presence of a meaningful secondary theme meant that this film had several layers of complexity which underlie just how well-crafted the characters and the story is.

  • The colour has returned to Kyon’s world, and he anticipates enjoying Haruhi’s cooking at the film’s end. I will note that it is an incredibly impressive feat for The Disappearance of Suzumiya Haruhi, that even after eight years of additional life experience, my conclusions about the movie and its theme have remained largely unchanged. The film’s messages remain as solid and meaningful as they were when I first watched it, speaking to the narrative’s excellence, and even now, the film is something I can easily recommend. With this, I’d like to wish all of my readers a Merry Christmas: now that this post is in the books, it’s time for me to head off and take a quiet day off to go through my games backlog, read and perhaps take a walk under the winter sun.

Between its moving plot and technical excellence (typical of Kyoto Animation’s best works), The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya is an excellent movie that masterfully brought the original light novel’s narrative to life. Through a combination of stunning visuals and a soundtrack composed of orchestral pieces that create an elegant feeling, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya is a film without peer. However, what elevates The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya to masterpiece status lies how the film’s message found relevance when I’d watched it: the film’s home release was a mere five months earlier, and upon hearing about the overwhelmingly positive reception, my curiosity was piqued. After hammering my way through the first two seasons, I ended up watching the film during the summer, spending those long summer afternoons, after research had ended, watching the movie. I finished the same day the local anime convention started, having chosen not to attend on account of a LAN party, and while the film was something I enjoyed deeply, thoughts of Yuki and the emergence of emotions in her character fell to the back of my mind. When one of my classmates posted a video of his convention experiences and made mention of Yuki, likening her sense of longing to his own post-convention blues, I’d realised that The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya‘s message was much more profound than I’d initially thought; having spent the movie focused on Kyon, I never really considered Yuki’s perspectives: as she spent more time with Kyon and the SOS Brigade, she begins to imbibe on decidedly human characteristics and wonders what it would be like if she could get closer to him. This silent sense of longing held a beautiful sort of melancholy, and also helped me to understand my classmate’s thoughts on anime conventions a little better, as well as make tangible my own understanding of what unrequited love entailed. While I would stare down and write the MCAT a year later, the year after, I had the time to attend the local anime convention for myself, and at last, I fully comprehended what my classmate meant when detailing the aftermath of an anime convention. For having eventually motivated me to visit and support the local anime convention, as well as providing a vivid and poignant story of what unrequited love can do, The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya had a non-trivial impact on my life, which is why it is designated as a masterpiece. Personal reasons aside, the film is of a remarkable quality, and par the course for Kyoto Animation’s productions, has aged very gracefully. I have no qualms recommending this movie (and note that the TV series is essential to the experience), but because I imagine most would have seen The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya already, I imagine that suggesting folks to re-watch it is also appropriate.

5 responses to “Masterpiece Anime Showcase: The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya, The Implications of Choice and Messages of Appreciation for the Decade’s Final Christmas

  1. Fred (Au Natural) December 25, 2019 at 11:24

    I enjoyed the TV series version of Suzumiya quite a bit. I’ll have to track down this movie.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Otakusphere: Good illnesses, vanishing heroines and a whole lot of honesty – In Search of Number Nine — An anime blog

  3. James McDaniel January 10, 2020 at 01:02

    I love Disappearance and recently wrapped up my rewatch of Haruhi Suzimiya. It still holds up very well from when I first saw it. Too bad it was the last direct anime entry in the Haruhi franchise. We at least got a few more light novels before the author went on hiatus. I definitely can agree that backlash towards Disappearance of Yuki Nagato comes from it not being the third season everyone wanted instead being a shoujo spinoff. It doesn’t help that several characters lose or downplay the quirks that made them unique in the original.

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    • infinitezenith January 10, 2020 at 23:23

      I heard that a third season for The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya never materialised because the original two anime seasons were primarily to promote interest in the light novels, and since they succeeded, there had been no plans to adapt additional volumes of the light novels, much to the community’s disappointment.

      On The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan, I personally really enjoyed its portrayal of the characters for presenting something different. It’s not a “one or the other” deal for me – seeing how the characters grow differently in response to their environment really helped me to appreciate how Kyon develops depending on whether or not it’s Haruhi or Yuki in his life.

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