The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

1337 Posts, and Yuru Camp△ 2 Live Action Adaptation: Review and Reflections At The Halfway Point

“Plan for what it is difficult while it is easy, do what is great while it is small.” –Sun Tzu

Rin spends time with Nadeshiko and Ayano in Hamamatsu before heading back home with her grandfather. Nadeshiko ends up taking a part time job to pick up the gas lamp she’d longed for, and Chiaki spends some time seasoning her new cast iron skillet, as well as removing the lacquer from a wooden bowl. She later plans out a camping trip at Lake Yamanaka with Ena and Aoi (Nadeshiko and Rin are busy with work). After picking up some gear from Mont Bell and swinging by an onsen, the group head towards their campground at the eastern edge of Lake Yamanaka. They meet a young woman and her corgi, but after settling down for some drinks, they realise the temperature’s plummeting quickly, and moreover, they’ve not prepared at all for the cold night ahead. This is where Yuru Camp△ 2‘s drama after six episodes, coinciding roughly with where Chiaki, Aoi and Ena end up at Yuru Camp△ 2‘s halfway point. By now, it is apparent that Yuru Camp△ 2‘s live action has taken several liberties with the order of events and progression: Chiaki preparing a cast iron skillet and wooden bowl originally during the first season prior to exams. However, speaking to the finesse of the writing, the Yuru Camp△ 2 drama never skips a beat, and changes in the events are smoothly integrated with the original timeline to create a very smooth story that stands of its own accord. In its execution, the Yuru Camp△ 2 live action shows how even with substantial modifications to the storyline, by virtue of omission or altering when it occurs, some stories can still flow elegantly. The end result is that I half expect there to be a few more surprises in store for the Yuru Camp△ 2 drama’s second half; seeing these differences (sometimes subtle, and othertimes obvious) has made the live-action adaptation engaging in its own right. While we might be retreading a familiar stories, minor variations keep the experience quite fresh.

In retrospect, Yuru Camp△ 2‘s first half is initially quite similar to the first season in that it covers the experience surrounding local camping, of visiting spots reachable by mass transit or moped. However, the combination of new locations explored and new lessons learnt add depth to the adventures; Nadeshiko is now close enough to get an honest answer from Rin about why solo camping has its own joys, and while the first season’s winter camping had been all fun and games, Chiaki, Aoi and Ena’s lack of research into the nighttime lows at Lake Yamanaka remind viewers of the importance of being properly prepared. The second season’s first half thus speaks to the idea that while the Outdoor Activities Club had become familiar with camping, there were a few things they needed to be made aware of before they could go on larger-scale outings. Having Chiaki, Aoi and Ena learn the importance of research and letting people know of their plans is vital for safety’s sake, and once this lesson is applied, viewers can rest assured that the characters are aware of the procedure to keep safe on their adventures. The messages are consistent across both the live action adaptation and the anime; this is, after all, a central part of the series, and disparities between the two notwithstanding, both the anime and drama do an outstanding job of conveying their messages across. One of the things I did notice about the live-action drama was that, while the episodes seem to space things out more, things never seemed to drag on. This is the mark of an engaging series – camping is a fun activity many partake in, but Yuru Camp△‘s uncommonly powerful presentation has encouraged people to take it up for themselves.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Last I wrote about the Yuru Camp△ live action drama was about a month and a half ago; attesting to how busy things’ve been, I’ve only been able to catch up on the live action recently, having spent almost all of my time finishing up Cold WarSuper CubYakunara Mug Cup Mo and Gundam SEED. Fortunately, shows don’t go anywhere, and so, I was able to pick up with the drama right where’d I had left off last.

  • Having the drama around meant my Yuru Camp△ withdrawal isn’t quite as severe as I initially imagined: I’ve long been impressed with how faithful the live-action adaptation was to events in the anime. Filming this second season can’t have been easy, especially since many of the events were related to phenomenon around the New Year’s timeframe, and in order to keep things authentic, the producers would’ve had to do most of their principal photography in winter. The end results, however, speak for themselves.

  • One of these days, I’d love to watch or read about a behind-the-scenes of how Yuru Camp△‘s drama was filmed: besides showing things like set design, I’m very fond of outtake reels and the like. A well-done movie or TV show is totally immersive, and with strong acting, it becomes easy to forget that we’re watching women and men completely embracing their roles to bring a certain world and its story to life. Being able to watch moments where actors and actresses flub a line or burst out laughing reminds us of the effort that goes into making these show come to life.

  • I did not cover this in my original post, nor did I feature this moment in any location hunt: Hamanakoo Bridge is located immediately north of Nagisaen Camping Ground at the western edge of Hamamatsu, and in both the anime and drama, the observation tower from Hamanako Garden Park can be seen. The lighting in the drama suggests a warmer day than the anime, but being Canadian, I’ve been around the block long enough to know that one cannot reliably ascertain ambient temperatures visually.

  • While waiting for Shizuhana to open, Rin is shocked that there are so many people here to buy strawberry daifuku so early in the day. Like the anime, Rin finds herself hoping that there’ll be enough to go around, since she’s only looking to grab a few for Nadeshiko, and all of the other customers are interested in buying large numbers at a time. The uptick in recent reviews for this confectionary store suggests that more locals are beginning to go out and about; traffic back home certainly has increased of late, and my provincial government have opened things up for people in my cohort to take their second vaccination.

  • I ended up getting my second shot yesterday, and once the vaccine does its thing within two weeks, it means I’ll have an acceptable level of protection against the virus. This doesn’t mean I’m in the clear yet (I’ll probably still carry a mask and hand sanitiser around for a ways after), but having the peace of mind that the most severe symptoms will be prevented is most welcome. At some point in the near future, once case numbers are consistently low, I do look forwards to returning to my favourite poutine joint this side of the world.

  • This moment is why Haruka Fukuhara is paid the big bucks to play Rin: Fukuhara’s portrayal of Rin’s reaction to the insane price of unagi is priceless, being even more amusing than her “eyes fall to the ground in shock” in the anime. Moments like these accentuate the greatest difference between anime and real life; whereas actresses and actors have the advantage of facial cues and body language, anime need to work twice as hard in order to convey the same feelings. Yuru Camp△ has no trouble with this in its anime incarnation, so it was especially fun to see how certain moments were conveyed in real life.

  • Yuno Ōhara herself is no slouch in bringing Nadeshiko’s mannerisms to life, either: Nadeshiko covers her eyes whenever something frightens or surprises her, and this is adorable. Ōhara even nails the facial expressions. The act of watching unagi being prepared is a little much for Nadeshiko, and while I’ve never had a problem with seeing the guts and whatnot from preparing fresh meat, I do appreciate that some people can become uncomfortable with it (Les Stroud mentions this in the opening disclaimer for Survivorman episodes and occasionally cuts away some scenes where he’s preparing something he’d caught).

  • Whereas the anime had Nadeshiko’s grandmother and Rin tugging on her cheeks, the drama has Ayano do so instead. Like Rin’s place, Nadeshiko’s grandmother’s home is not precisely placed; in real life, an empty lot occupies the spot where Nadeshiko’s grandmother’s house is supposed to be located. Instead, the drama uses a building located a hundred and thirty-three metres to the east as the location for exterior shots, and I imagine that interior shots are filmed either on a sound stage or at an undisclosed location.

  • Prior to Nadeshiko’s departure, Ayano had encouraged her to pick up something new, and in the half-year or so since Nadeshiko moved to Yamanashi, she’d picked up camping, to Ayano’s joy. Here, she and Nadeshiko both learn the reason behind Rin’s preferences for solo camping. It was here that Yuru Camp△ really struck a resonant chord with viewers; most anime would opt to emphasise that there’s joy to be had in groups, but Yuru Camp△ ended up saying that people can enjoy solo activities as well, which comes with its own set of merits. Rather than attempt to leave viewers with only one message, Yuru Camp△ therefore suggests that there is no right or wrong way to approach a hobby so long as one is doing so safely.

  • Back home in Yamanashi, Chiaki relives Rin, Nadeshiko and Aoi’s travels in food form, but since the curry requires preparation to enjoy, she stows it away for later use. We’re now back in Motosu, and it’s a welcome return to the school grounds, which had sat empty until Yuru Camp△ popularised the site anew. When I first heard about the drama via social media, I’d only been tangentially interested, but after trailers began appearing, and I noticed that the Outdoor Activities Club’s clubroom at Motosu High School was actually based off the real-world location, I immediately wished to check the drama out for myself.

  • Classic scenes like Nadeshiko acting as a makeshift pole make a return in Yuru Camp△ 2‘s live action, right down to the facial expressions. It initially feels a little mean-spirited to suddenly spring a game of scissors-stone-cloth to determine who should be the pole, especially in the knowledge that Chiaki and Aoi have known one another for a long time and roughly know what to expect. Nadeshiko eventually swaps herself out for an easel, and remarks that if Chiaki needs her as a pole again, she’ll have to charge her an hourly rate for such a service.

  • With the money she’d earned from work, Ena ends up buying a dog-sized tent for Chikuwa that costs as much as any tent for people. The price is consistent with what I’ve found for North American equivalents, and camping with dogs does require an extra bit of research to ensure good times – some campgrounds are more dog friendly than others, and it’s probably worth ensuring one’s dog is up to speed on their vaccinations. For now, however, the winter cold means that it’s probably not the best idea to bring Chikuwa out to camp, and Rin is left to wish that she could see Chikuwa and his little tent in person.

  • After her contract with the post office comes to a close, Nadeshiko laments that all of the part time jobs suitable for secondary schools are located in Kofu a ways to the north. I absolutely sympathise with how Nadeshiko feels about things: in my corner of the world, most technology-related jobs are for oil and gas companies, and a majority of the mobile development jobs are either out west or east. However, changing circumstances means that more companies are okay with hiring remote workers, and there may come a future where I’ll have to grow accustomed to working remotely. I joke that so long as I have a computer, power supply and internet connection, I could work anywhere in the world, although in Nadeshiko’s case, practical constraints mean that she’s limited to whatever is available in the Minobu/Nambu area.

  • Sakura comes through one day – she invites Nadeshiko out to dinner at a local soba restaurant that serves a delicious ebi tempura and remarks that they’re hiring, but because they’d only just opened the position, there were no ads in the local classified. For the first time, Nadeshiko is even more excited about the job than she is about the meal she’s about to enjoy, and Sakura asks her to at least have dinner before getting psyched about being able to work hard and earn some coin.

  • With her first paycheque from the soba restaurant, Nadeshiko finally has enough money to pick up the gas lamp she’d long adored. The anime had Nadeshiko trip on a shoebox and nearly drop her new purchase, but the live-action sees her toss the box into the air out of excitement. This minor change did feel a little disingenuous to Nadeshiko’s character – she’d grown quite a bit since the series began, and however excited Nadeshiko might be about the new gas lamp, she’d also realise the effort it took to get here. Fortunately, one of the store’s clerks are on hand to help out. He makes a stunning catch worthy of the Calgary Stampeders and cheers alongside the others.

  • Back home, Nadeshiko lights the gas lamp for her parents. While Nadeshiko had taken a liking to the lamp owing to its appearance, Yuru Camp△ also has it become a tangible representation of Nadeshiko’s maturity. From getting lost on a bike shortly after moving to Yamanashi, to taking up camping and learning the ins and outs, as well as picking up a job so she can pursue camping more throughly, the milestone of earning enough to buy said gas lamp was the surest sign that for us viewers, we needn’t worry about Nadeshiko, since she has the resolve and drive to make discoveries on her own and ask for help when needed.

  • Having this confidence in Nadeshiko thus opens Yuru Camp△ up for new adventures of a much larger scale, and further driving this point home, Nadeshiko’s decision to gift Sakura a reusable hand-warmer shows that, while she may be ditzy and a glutton who lives in the present, she’s also kind and very aware of those around her. The anime and English-language materials don’t say anything about how old Sakura is, but having picked up the Yuru Camp△ official guidebook back in 2019, I ended up learning that Sakura is a university student.

  • The biggest surprise for me about Yuru Camp△ 2‘s drama was that, after Nadeshiko buys her gas lamp, the story switches over to Chiaki and Aoi discussing fancy camping implements; over the weekend, Chiaki had managed to pick up a cast iron skillet and wooden bowl, plus a small table cloth and rack that can be used as a makeshift table. This particular story was a part of Yuru Camp△‘s first season, where Chikai totally procrastinates for her exams by taking some time to season the skillet and remove the lacquer from the bowl. While jarring, the drama ends up fitting things seamlessly into the second season, portraying Chiaki’s exercise as preparations for their next camping trip and also foreshadowing the group that will go camping next.

  • The Yuru Camp△ live action adaptation’s first season had omitted this altogether so everything could be fit into the season, but I’m glad that Yuru Camp△ 2 found a way to incorporate it back in – the segments where Chiaki, Aoi and Ena go through how to properly season cast iron cookware and prepare wooden bowls for holding hot food are reminiscent of the step-by-step processes seen in something like MythBusters, turning a prima facie boring process into an instructive and engaging one. Of course, not shown in the live-action is Aki Toyosaki’s adorable scream of pain when she accidentally comes into contact with the hot skillet: Yumena Yanai’s portrayal of Aoi, while still faithful, lacks the same good-natured antics that Toyosaki brings to the table.

  • With the weekend here, Chiaki, Aoi and Ena set off for their first-ever camping adventure without Nadeshiko: she and Rin were scheduled for work this weekend. Their trip opens at Mount Fuji Station in Fujiyoshida, reachable from Minobu by taking a train into Kofu and then switching over to the bus that takes them to the station. While the drama frames the shot from a different angle, the same energy and excitement from the anime is conveyed – I imagine that the choice to frame the shot this way was also to show how large the world is, foreshadowing what would happen on Chiaki, Aoi and Ena’s Lake Yamanaka trip.

  • The scene of Chiaki slipping and falling on ice at Mount Fuji Station was omitted in the drama: instead of creating a situation that leads Ena to snap a photo of Aoi trying to keep Chiaki from falling, she simply feels the need to sneeze and has the sneeze fail. For some inexplicable reason, sneezes feel very satisfying, so when a sneeze “dies”, it can be accompanied with a strange feeling of frustration.

  • While Chiaki is quite pleased with herself for having secured an inexpensive transit option, the sparse schedule means that the trio must sprint off to catch their bus, lest they’re stuck waiting for another hour for the next ride. Public transit in Japan remains more accessible than anything I’m familiar with back home; the sprawl of Canadian urban design means that infrastructure costs more per capita, and simply put, it costs more to run bus lines when there are fewer riders, causing the price of tickets to rise. In Hong Kong, for instance, the price to ride the tram from North Point to Central is 2.60 HKD, or 42 cents. However, back home, an adult transit ticket costs 3.50 CAD and is only valid for 90 minutes.

  • I’ve long been a proponent of higher-density developments that make things more accessible in the absence of a car; this stands in stark contrast with home developers’ insistence that the 2400-square-foot home is good enough for everyone, and indeed, their resistance to building differently is astounding. A few years ago, my city’s mayor was involved in a lawsuit after suggesting that he would push to increase density and increase the costs for home developers to construct single-family subdivisions. The case was settled out of court, and while the city has plans for sustainable growth, the reality is that I’ll probably continue to see McMansions pop up at the edge of town in the years to come, and will probably need to resign myself to the fact that my city isn’t going to be walkable for a while yet.

  • Chiaki gloats about how nice it feels to go relax while others are working, a clever callback to the idea that she’s still a little salty about having spent the whole of her winter break working. Rather than mean-spirited, however, this moment feels hilarious and speaks to Chiaki’s love for hanging out. The group’s first destination is Montbell, an outdoors store even larger than Kofu’s Elk. Whereas the anime had presented Montbell as a larger Caribou branch, the live-action adaptation shows Montbell in its original glory, right down to the giant stuffed bear at the front of the store.

  • These stuffed bears are exactly what I was referring to while writing about Yuru Camp△ 2‘s fifth episode a few months earlier; the anime had substituted a giant caribou for the bear, and in the manga (as well as one of the Heya Camp△ segments), Aoi is seen to have developed a great fondness for Caribou-kun: after buying the entire plushie, she takes him on camping trips. These giant stuffed animals are a common sight in Banff, and today, being Canada Day, is a time where I spend time with family hanging out in the mountains.

  • This year, we’ve chosen to have a quieter day at home to deal with some household stuff: the temperatures today are expected to top out at 36°C, and it’s been this hot all week on account of the persistent heat dome that’s settled over our area. It’s certainly a far cry from Yuru Camp△ and its wintery conditions; at Mont Bell, where Chiaki attempts to determine what the best option she has for a lightweight hammock with a frame is. After performing a dance of sorts for the clerk, the clerk has just the thing. The anime kept this a surprise for viewers, while the drama simply shows the solution for Chiaki: two low chairs.

  • After their purchases are completed, Ena receives a set of pictures of Chikuwa enjoying his new doggy-tent immensely. This immediately leads Aoi and Chiaki to melt, and then wonder how on earth Chikiwa could be sending the photos himself. It is shown Ena’s father is taking and sending the photos, which was a very clever way of showing the cordial relationship Ena has with her family. In the anime, Ena is never shown as receiving the photos and therefore can be surmised to have taken them before they’d set out for Lake Yamanaka.

  • With an ambient temperature of 1.4°C, Aoi, Ena and Chiaki struggle to leave the onsen. It had been Ena who’d suggested to Rin that she try the Nordic Cycle out during Heya Camp△‘s OVA, suggesting that it’s good for circulation; presumably, after feeling particularly invigourated after leaving the waters and stepping into the brisk winter air, Ena felt it might be something Rin would probably like. This is what led me to surmise that Rin’s weekend trip was probably set after the events at Lake Yamanaka, but before their trip to Izu.

  • Whether it is the drama or anime, Yuru Camp△ has always excelled with its portrayal of enjoying the small moments in life. After unwinding in the onsen, Chiaki, Ena and Aoi enjoy ice creams prior to their next destination. I’ve always had a fondness for Japanese soft-serve: the ice cream out here tends to be very hard and is much cooler, whereas in Japan, their ice cream is creamier and smoother. Moreover, soft-serve ice cream has a lower fat content and is served at a slightly higher temperature, reducing instances of brain-freeze.

  • Chiaki melts into the floor from comfort, prompting Aoi to try and wake her up before she falls asleep, which would set them back on their schedule (this had happened on the Outdoor Activities Club’s first trip to Fuefuki), and with the bus routes as infrequent as they are, this could prove challenging. However, Aoi’s problems are doubled when Ena does the same. The humour of Yuru Camp△ translates well into reality, and Aoi’s frustration is apparent as she tries to get her friends going.

  • Nadeshiko’s expertise with nabe is what allows the Outdoor Activities Club to experience great-tasting hot pot while camping. A bit of ingenuity and substituting out ingredients that are easier to transport and prepare means that the original recipe’s flavours are largely retained, without demanding additional preparation or storage constraints while out on the campgrounds.

  • After one more bus ride, Ena, Aoi and Chiaki finally arrive at Misaki Camping Ground on the eastern edge of Lake Yamanaka. The drama takes the time to show how beautiful the area is, and again, it is apparent that the producers used drone footage to shoot scenes over the lake itself. Drones have definitely allowed producers, both with high and low budgets, to shoot some fantastic footage; Les Stroud began using drones in his later seasons, and with the technology become increasingly inexpensive, he even encouraged his drone operators to go for style, since if a drone was wrecked, he’d simply buy another one.

  • I found that the manager at Misaki Camping Ground resembles Hong Kong’s Jimmy Lai, and the itself moment quite hilarious; while it might be disappointing to Chiaki, Aoi and Ena, there are practical reasons for disallowing campers to set up their tents on the cape itself. While Yuru Camp△ had presented camp ground managers as being quite friendly and polite, here at Misaki Camping Ground, there did seem to be a bit of tension here which again, foreshadows the fact that Lake Yamanaka offers a sort of challenge that previous camping grounds did not.

  • I also ended up purchasing Yuru CampΔ: Virtual Camp for the Oculus Quest today; developed by Gemdrop, I’ve been eying the games since they launched earlier this year. There’s one set at Lake Motosu and one at Fumoto Campsite, retailing for 25 CAD each, so I figured I’d start by playing as Nadeshiko on the shores of Lake Motosu and then return at a later time to give Fumoto a shot, if Lake Motosu impressed. As it turns out, the VR experience is quite compelling; while it isn’t physically demanding as something like SUPERHOT VR, the scenery and character models are well rendered. One thing that became very apparent is that Rin’s character model is absolutely tiny; her height is given as being 144 cm (even smaller than K-On!‘s Azu-nyan, who’s 150 cm).

  • Yuru CampΔ: Virtual Camp shows that a part of the anime experience can indeed be faithfully reproduced in the VR environment, and I wouldn’t mind giving the Fumoto Campsite version a go, as well. Players can navigate between the different scenarios quite easily, but also choose to just lose themselves at a given time of day and admire the scenery. One thing I particularly liked is the fact that Nadeshiko can call out to Rin with her signature Rin-chan~! as the sun is setting, and while the story itself is quite short, I do see myself returning to chill on the shores of Lake Motosu in the future. Having said this, capturing footage from the Oculus Quest is a bit tricky, so it’ll be an experience I can’t readily write about here.

  • While pitching one’s tent may be prohibited on the cape, there’s nothing that says one can’t set up their chairs here and kick back. Chiaki thus goes about setting up a fancy drink, a hot buttered rum, for everyone. The girls’ phones don’t appear to be a problem at this point in the drama; the anime and manga had the phones run out of juice from the cold, which complicates things. Fortunately, Chiaki, Aoi and Ena have a guardian angel in the form of Rin: unlike the others, she knows that Lake Yamanaka can get cold from its elevation, so she eventually becomes worried about the three.

  • Choko and her owner show up after the hot buttered rums are prepared in the drama; here, Chiaki wonders if the Corgi is Nadeshiko manifesting in spirit form. This was originally present in the manga, but was never mentioned in the anime, so seeing it return in the drama was a pleasant touch. After giving Choko pats, they turn back to their drinks, only to find that in the short time Choko was occupying their attention, everything’s frozen solid. As the temperatures cool, Chiaki realises they’re in trouble unless they do something immediately to turn their situation around.

  • While the anime really drove up the stakes by having the group only realise their situation after the sun had set, there’s still a little light in the drama when Chaiki runs off to the nearest convenience store for some heavy-duty warmers while Aoi and Ena attempt to get firewood, only to spot the manager leaving for the day. Such a moment would be quite suspenseful, but since most viewers would undoubtedly be watching the drama after seeing the anime and/or having read the manga, what happens next isn’t too much of a concern. This post has been a fun one to write for, and I’ll be returning at some point in the future to wrap up Yuru Camp△ 2‘s drama. In the meantime, it’s time to catch up on Higurashi SOTSU‘s first two episodes, then spend the next little bit wrapping up talks for Gundam SEED86 EIGHTY-SIX and Higehiro before delving into the summer season’s shows: I only have plans to write about The Aquatope on White Sand and Magia Record at present, with the idea being that a lighter blogging schedule hopefully translates to being able to play more DOOM Eternal.

I’ll briefly stop here to note that with this talk on where I stand with Yuru Camp△ 2‘s live action drama with six of twelve episodes in the books, I’ve reached yet another milestone with this blog: thirteen hundred and thirty seven posts. This number is significant and is a callback to the earlier days of the internet – originally, 1337 was a numerical spelling of the term “elite” and had been associated with the hacker subculture, denoting formidable skill and knowledge in the area. The substitution of numbers in some spellings spilled over to the world of gaming, and eventually, 1337 became an adjective for “awesome”. That I’ve written 1337 posts over the past nine-and-a-half years has spoken to two things: the first is that having an awesome reader base, one that provides honest feedback, shares recollections and sets me straight if should I step out of line, has been most encouraging. Without you, the readers, I’m certain this blog and the various misadventures I’ve been on over the years, would’ve never endured for as long as it did. The second is that in the journey of life, there’s always something worth sharing: Yuru Camp△ 2‘s live action adaptation is one of them, and I’m certainly having fun writing for these posts and whipping up the images comparing and contrasting a given moment in the drama with its counterpart in the anime. At the end of the day, this is what blogging boils down to – it’s a matter of having fun writing what we write about, and knowing that even if a post has helped one individual’s day in some way, whether it’s answer any questions the reader had about something or giving them something to smile about, the post has accomplished its goal. Similarly, Yuru Camp△ 2‘s live action drama consistently puts a smile on my face, and while the series has finished airing, I am a little behind on things, so I’ll aim to continue watching this one and write about my final impressions once that’s in the books.

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