The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games and life converge

Growing Sunny, Crying and Sometimes Singing: Revisiting the Conclusion of Tari Tari a Decade Later and The Legacy A Celebration of Multidisciplinary Approaches Imparted on P.A. Works

“That’s the key to new and good ideas; they come from having a very broad and multidisciplinary range of interests.” –Robin Chase

While Tari Tari had opened with uncertain aims, by its finale, this series had delivered a moving story of how a disparate group would come together and, using their unique backgrounds and experiences, help one another out of their problems before rallying their entire school together to perform one final swan song, in the form of a play with live music from the choir, before it closes down ahead of a plan to redevelop the area. Although Tari Tari had seemingly been about everything and nothing, this aspect of it proved to be the anime’s greatest asset – each of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro came in with different skills and perspectives, but despite seemingly lacking a shared set of interests, they come to realise the worth of their time spent together and cherish the memories they make, using these experiences to forge onwards into an uncertain future. In this way, Tari Tari was a celebration of being multidisciplinary; the final performance comes about precisely because everyone was able to bring something distinct to the table. Wakana’s background in music and a desire to bring her mother’s old song to life allows her to write the play’s music. Konatsu’s optimism and enthusiasm keeps her friends moving forward even when everyone seems mired in their own problems. Atsuhiro similarly desires to do something grand for a friend back home and ends up contributing the props with Taichi, while Sawa uses her connections to bring as many people as possible to make the show one to remember. None of this would’ve been possible had the characters not opened up to one another – when Tari Tari concluded, the series’ emphasis on music had spoken to the idea that music transcends background, belief, intents and desires to unify people. The series showed how people who are outwardly different can share more in common than they had imagined, and that by opening people up to this fact, music can set people down a rewarding path they’d never experienced. Seeing Wakana come to terms with her mother’s death, and Sawa fighting her hardest to again admittance to an equestrian school reminds viewers that everyone has their own struggles, but when they open up and help one another out, seemingly insurmountable problems are overcome. However, Tari Tari also marked the first time P.A. Works explored the multidisciplinary mindset. Rather than have each of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro be members of the choral club, Tari Tari gave everyone a unique background and has them come together in the unusually-named Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club. Such a setup would, on paper, seem conducive towards lack of a cohesive direction, but the club ends up exceeding expectations in its achievements precisely because, given that Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro all contribute different things to the swan song that leaves their entire graduating class with life-long memories.

In its execution, Tari Tari would ultimately set the precedence for P.A. Works’ future anime to a nontrivial extent. Despite possessing a less focused story than its predecessor, Hanasaku Iroha, and having a shorter runtime, Tari Tari had demonstrated that even with the short format and a narrative that progressed much more quickly, it remained possible to tell a highly compelling story with engaging, relatable characters. This approach would return in Sakura Quest, which similarly had a group of individuals with distinct skillsets and backgrounds unite in a quest to bolster tourism in a remote rural town, and again in The World in Colours, where magic and photography combine together to allow Hitomi and her grandmother, Kohaku, to connect more closely and help Hitomi to regain the colours in her world. Similarly, in The Aquatope on White Sand, Kukuru and Fūka both end their stories quite far from their first steps. Fūka began her journey as a failed idol who sought refuge by working in an aquarium, but her experience in entertainment allows her to bring a very unique skillset to become a talented attendant. Kukuru had spent her entire life enraptured by marine life and longed to be an attendant, but at Tingarla, she discovers that her attempts to keep Gama Gama open means, when she puts her mind to it, she is able to excel in marketing, as well. Tari Tari established that stories celebrating the multidisciplinary approach can be exceptionally moving regardless of the context – in time, viewers will come to root for the characters because seeing their stories and grit proves inspiring, regardless of whether the characters’ goals are to embrace magic, bring tourism and life back to a small town or promote a newly-opened aquarium. In promoting the multidisciplinary approach to life, P.A. Works is seeking to remind viewers of its increasing relevance in all facets of life – combining seemingly unrelated fields confers numerous advantages in both academia and industry because it provides a more holistic view of a problem, and this in turn allows one to draw upon knowledge from different areas to identify and implement effective, innovative solutions. Through their stories, P.A. Works celebrates methods that encourage people to adopt a broader mindset towards the challenges in their lives, and from a storytelling perspective, it creates for plots in which one is always kept on the edge of the seat by what’s about to happen next.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • By Tari Tari‘s end, everyone’s undergone a considerable amount of growth. Konatsu is more mindful of those around her, while Wakana has rediscovered music, and Sawa similarly realises that she can count on people in her corner to help out. It was a rewarding journey to follow, and thirteen episodes later, Tari Tari shows that even with the shorter format, P.A. Works could still deliver a fantastic story by ensuring that no moment is wasted. In this way, Tari Tari is all steak on top of its sizzle. Towards the series’ end, the land the students’ school stands on us purchased by a land developer, forcing term to close early.

  • Although the developers had tried to buy the principal out, in the end, the principal decides his students’ memories are worth more than whatever bonus they’re prepared to offer him. Forgoing the bonus, he authorises the final performance to proceed even as a heavy rainfall hammers Enoshima. One detail in Tari Tari I’ve always found especially impressive was the use of reflections to convey the idea of wetness on the ground whenever it rains, and here the characters’ reflections can plainly be seen. Tari Tari aired during a time when NVIDIA’s Kepler series first hit the market: this was well before real-time ray-tracing became mainstream, and a part of me does wonder if real-time ray-tracing could be applied towards anime.

  • Instructor Naoko had been a minor antagonist of sorts early in Tari Tari: she was strongly opposed to Konatsu starting her own choral club and seemed quite intent on ensuring that Konatsu would not sing, but as Tari Tari wore on, it became clear that Naoko saw a bit of Wakana’s mother, Mahiru, in Konatsu: when she was still alive, Mahiru had been a free spirit who was both knowledgeable about musical theory and saw music as an avenue for having fun. Over time, seeing Wakana come around helps Naoko to accept her best friend’s passing.

  • Thus, on the day of the performance, Naoko has no qualms in backing the principal’s decision to allow the performance to continue, and she even helps organise the choral club and band’s participation. The rainy weather on this morning had acted as something of a dampener, accentuating the feeling of unease, but once everyone gathers, even rain cannot douse their spirits. The Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club thus initiate preparations ahead of their presentation while other students and parents begin assembling to watch the show.

  • Although Konatsu had initially appeared to be a Ohana Matsumae knockoff, over the course of Tari Tari, she would come to gain development of her own. Like Ohana, Konatsu is optimistic to a fault and is very forceful about what she wants, but this initially gets her in trouble with those around her. Konatsu gradually learns to dial it back and think before jumping into a situation, but is also given a chance to be her usual self upon learning the school is closing; her blunt and direct approach is needed in a time where speed is essential in ensuring everything is ready, inspiring even her former choral club classmates to contribute.

  • As the morning transitions into the afternoon, the rain begins letting up, and some of the students start showing up to check out the performance. Enoshima Sea Candle can be seen in the background: the events of Tari Tari are set in Fujisawa, and the area’s picturesque landscape has made it a popular choice for being the setting in a given anime. However, of all the incarnations I’ve seen so far, Tari Tari‘s portrayal of Fujisawa and Enoshima remains the best: even though this is one of P.A. Works’ earlier titles, Tari Tari‘s visuals are gorgeous.

  • The musical finally begins: this had originally been Konatsu’s idea as their school geared up for their annual culture festival, but when the developers purchased the land and accelerated their plans to begin construction, all school events were cancelled. Refusing to give up, Konatsu and her friends ended up pushing ahead even without permission; help from Wakana is ultimately what gives everyone the resolve to continue. Wakana had begun her journey in Tari Tari with the intent of quitting music and leaving her regrets behind: shortly before her mother had passed away, Wakana had been short with her, and since then, she’d felt guilty about not spending more time with her. Abandoning music was her original way of leaving the pain behind, but through Konatsu and Sawa, Wakana realises the way forward is to embrace what her mother had loved.

  • The energy and determination in the Choir-and-Sometimes-Badmonton Club exude eventually convinces their classmates to help out; because their school was slated to close so suddenly, the students realise that this represents a final chance of sorts to participate in a swan song to their high school memories. In this way, the club is able persuade both their fellow students and neighbourhood to show up. The sort of outcome in Tari Tari brought to mind memories of my first-ever journal publication: it had been abandoned when term picked up, but after the MCAT, I found myself with more time than I’d known what to do with.

  • Working on the paper with my colleagues was my way of filling that time and doing something with the remainder of my summer. In the end, we were able to complete the paper ahead of the deadline, and when I asked my colleagues if they wanted to be first author, both agreed that since I ended up spearheading the project and bringing it back to life, I had earned that particular honour. Like the musical Konatsu had wanted to perform, publishing this paper was a bit of a last minute thing, and while it did mean I spent three weeks not working on starting my thesis project, the paper actually would accelerate my thesis work by giving me the inspiration I needed to design the project.

  • Hikari no Senritsu is a recurring theme in Tari Tari: the song was originally written by Mahiru, and Wakana later adapts it into a version that the Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club perform for their finale. As the group breaks into song, the clouds begin dispersing, with shafts of light illuminating the performers right as they hit their stride. While short, Tari Tari‘s journey and its parallels with my undergraduate paper led me to count this as a masterpiece, showing what’s possible when hearts and minds align.

  • During the finale, scenes cut to the audience enjoying the show immensely: Sawa’s father is especially enthusiastic, having brought both a video camera and DSLR camera to capture his daughter’s accomplishments. For Sawa, Tari Tari saw her as a friendly girl who generally gets along with people, but struggled with her rejected equestrian school application because she’d been too tall to qualify. Although Sawa’s father had considered her aspirations as being a game rather than a legitimate occupation, he would come around and see how serious Sawa had been. Despite his gruff nature, Sawa’s father genuinely cares for her.

  • Taichi and Atsuhiro ended up receiving some development: although failing to perform well at a tournament, Taichi resolves to give it everything he’s got, while Atsuhiro’s preoccupation with a friend back in Austria leads him to double down and do what he can here in Japan for his friend’s sake. Everyone’s stories converge on this one moment, and seeing everyone singing so gracefully together, one would be forgiven if they imagined Konatsu, Sawa, Wakana, Taichi and Atsuhiro to be members of their school’s choral club.

  • Tari Tari‘s final performance was so moving that amongst the anime community, the series was universally acclaimed. Random Curiosity wrote that it was almost criminal as to how the expectations for this series was so low early on, especially when Tari Tari went out of its way to make itself stand out from its predecessor, and other fans felt that the series had been so decisive and satisfying that it exceeded expectations. Despite being a little-known series, Tari Tari‘s sincerity and focus impressed most viewers. In fact, to the best of my recollections, only THEM Anime Reviews had anything negative to say about Tari Tari, calling it a series ” full of platitudes and melodrama but lacking in most other respects”, and that “music anime out there in which the actual music is much, much better, and dramas in which the trials and tribulations the characters face are far less contrived-seeming”. I strongly disagree with this assessment because it is superficial and fails to understand why drama is present in Tari Tari.

  • THEM Anime Reviews’ writer missed the point of the series (namely, that music transcends certain barriers, that one needs to allow themselves to open up in order to get past problems they can’t individually handle, and that sometimes, situations arise that require people possessing skills from a range of backgrounds). The series isn’t “a lot of artificial drama being thrown in to make the journey to that performance seem significant”, and instead, Tari Tari sought to show how being multidisciplinary is the key to overcoming life’s problems. In this area, Tari Tari is successful, and I’ve found that, especially where P.A. Works’ anime are concerned, the most critical views often come from those who have not experienced the sorts of messages a given anime sought to convey.

  • As the performance draws to a close, the camera pulls out, showing the number of people that have shown up to see the show, as well as the size of the choral club. By this point in time, the clouds have begun giving way to a clear day, acting as a metaphor for how times of difficulty will always pass. It is evident that this final show was a resounding success, and with this particular goal satisfied, Wakana, Sawa, Konatsu, Taichi and Atsuhiro turn their attention towards their future aspirations. I still vividly recall entering my thesis year as Tari Tari geared up for its finale.

  • A week after term started, I got my MCAT results back, and with a great weight lifted off my chest, I focused my entire effort towards the thesis project. After sitting down with my supervisor and asking about whether or not it would be feasible to extend my old renal model from two summers earlier, we hashed out a project that could show off the lab’s in-house game engine. I’d worked with this game engine for two years at that point and was quite familiar with its strengths and limitations, so when it came time to present my project proposal, I was completely confident that I could answer any question about the system, its implications and constraints.

  • The thesis project took up two of the five slots in each semester, so I had three remaining courses to fill. I decided to take easier options so I could focus on the project: in science fiction literature and genomics, I excelled. These courses were largely based on reading and writing papers, something I’d been reasonably confident in doing at that point. The other course I had begun taking was iOS programming. I would end up working on a game, and while that project was unimpressive, it did kick-start my interest in mobile development. Until graduate school, this was the easiest term I’d taken, allowing me plenty of time to work on my thesis project.

  • Looking back, my undergraduate thesis was also quite unremarkable: I’d already had an impressive model of agent-based flow by then, so the project itself entailed writing a mathematical modelling layer over top and then synchronising a visual representation of several nephrons working together in parallel to the model’s outputs, before making use of the game engine’s world space to illustrate the different scales. I would’ve liked to have explored more complex processes, such as self-assembly. However, my supervisor and invigilators were satisfied with the level of complexity in my project.

  • In the end, I had a great time with my project, and while things do seem unsophisticated a decade later, I nonetheless found a fantastic experience in going through the thesis project. A decade after starting this project, I’m now a half-year into living at the new place, and I feel quite settled in now. Looking back at some of the posts I wrote shortly after the move, I did end up capitalising on the amenities: over the summer, I’ve had a chance to enjoy sushi twice from the nearby Japanese restaurant, spent an afternoon working out of a Starbucks with a fruit juice in hand, and even was able to pick up an RTX 3060 Ti during a flash sale after work.

  • Summer had been a fantastic time this year, and while I’m a little sad to see my favourite times of year draw to a close, the Autumnal Equinox was two days ago, bringing with it comfortably brisk days that are still pleasant. The leaves have taken a little longer to yellow this year than they have in previous years, but I welcome the fact that we’re no longer getting heat warnings. In fact, for the first time in a while, I’m rather looking forwards to the winter, as well. In previous years, winters meant negotiating icy roads and shovelling out after a snowfall while wind-chill drops the thermometer down to -40°C for up to two weeks at a time, but it also blankets the landscape in white and invites the sipping of a hot chocolate while curled up in one’s favourite easy chair with a book and blanket in hand.

  • Tari Tari‘s epilogue was satisfying, but also left quite a bit ambiguous: in particular, the outcome of Taichi’s kokuhaku to Sawa is left unknown. This question has lingered on my mind for the past decade, and while Tari Tari ~Mebaitari Terashitari Yappari Tokidoki Utattari~ (Tari Tari ~Budding, Shining, and Sometimes Singing~), a sequel novel set a decade after the original’s events, was released back in July 2018, interest in this has been sufficiently low so that even a synopsis for the novel’s premise doesn’t exist. I can say that in ten years, a lot can change: ten years after I graduate high school, I fulfilled a lifelong dream of visiting Japan, finished my graduate degree and was working with my first start-up.

  • This year marks the ten year anniversary to Tari Tari: I’d been a student a decade earlier, gearing up for my undergraduate thesis defense. A full ten years later, I’ve become a senior iOS developer and homeowner. In spite of everything that has happened, the fact that I still remember Tari Tari as fondly now as I did when the series finished airing back in 2012 speaks volumes to how much this anime got right. The amount of stuff that can happen in a decade is staggering, and this is one of the biggest reasons why being unable to read Tari Tari ~Mebaitari Terashitari Yappari Tokidoki Utattari~ is so excruciatingly painful: I’ve been longing to see how Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro are doing.

  • However, because most people in reality tend to be honest, hard-working and sincere, most people tend to find a path for themselves over time. Applying this to Tari Tari would suggest that everyone must be well, having had ten years to broaden their horizons, grow their skillsets and improve their ability to empathise with one another. Because of how much can happen in ten years, a part of me also feels that Taichi’s feelings for Sawa could wane over time as he pursues his own passions. As romantic and touching as it would be for the pair to retain their feelings after all this time, people do drift apart over time, especially since Sawa had been heading overseas to follow her dreams of becoming a jockey.

  • Regardless of what actually happens in the sequel novel, I would be more than happy to read it. At the time of writing, I don’t believe the novel’s even available for purchase at my usual avenues: if it were, I’d have no qualms in picking it up because in this day and age, ML and computer vision is sufficiently advanced so that I could simply take my phone, image the text and get a real-time translation. With iOS 16, I can then extract the text from my image and then convert it into strings that I can open in a text editor, where I could edit and improve passages. In this way, I feel that I could translate the novel for myself without much difficulty.

  • I’ve always wanted to feature the moment where Sawa begins singing alongside her friends and opens the window in her dormitory: I’ve written about Tari Tari quite extensively over the years, but never was able to feature this moment previously. There’s a sort of joy about Sawa doing this that captures the sort of excitement that accompanies the uncertainty of stepping into the future. I believe it is this scene of Sawa opening the window with a smile on her face that I would later comment on in RPG Real Estate, when Kotone does the same while checking out a prospective property.

  • I imagine that seeing Wakana take up music again encourages Naoko to spend more time mentoring her. Naoko had always found Mahiru’s approach to music admirable, but one she could never take up, and when she died, it was probably the case that Naoko handled her grief by distancing herself from music as a source of joy. However, when Wakana comes to terms with her mother’s death and approaches to music, to Naoko, Wakana has inherited her mother’s joyful spirit, as well. Mahiru might no longer be around, but mentoring Wakana allows Naoko to keep supporting her best friend.

  • Meanwhile, Tari Tari‘s epilogue shows Konatsu as meeting two other girls that seem quite friendly: although Konatsu has known Taichi and Sawa for a long time, such a moment shows that Konatsu can find her own path forward, as well. Small details like these can speak volumes about how characters are doing, and I’ve noticed that since Tari Tari, P.A. Works is a studio that has excelled in finding a way of saying goodbye to its series. Although making up only a short amount of the finale’s runtime, these short scenes provide a satisfactory amount of insight into how everyone’s doing.

  • On account of yesterday marking the half-year anniversary since moving day, we treated the family to the famous fried chicken from the Japanese restaurant across the way; they’ve been running a promotion on their in-house ginger-garlic karaage, which is going for a dollar a piece. In this way, we were able to have a wonderful dinner commemorating six months at the new place for fifteen dollars, a fantastic deal: the chicken is expertly fried, being crunchy outside but retaining succulent and tender meat. The Japanese restaurant is suggesting they’ll be introducing new flavours in the future, which is exciting: I’m curious to see what other flavours the chefs have coming.

  • With this, my reminiscence of Tari Tari comes to a close. I’ve written about the series with some frequency over the past decade, speaking to the strengths of this series: despite the time that has passed, the fact that Tari Tari‘s lessons now remain as applicable as they did back in 2012 is a key indicator to how well everything here was thought out. After Tari Tari ended, P.A. Works would swing between creating smash-hits like Shirobako and Nagi no Asukara, alongside failures like RDG Red Data Girl and Glasslip. Over the years, however, learnings from Tari Tari have meant that P.A. Works’ coming-of-age and workplace anime tend to be quite consistent: Sakura QuestThe World in Colours and The Aquatope on White Sand all carry over the multidisciplinary approach that Tari Tari pioneered.

When Tari Tari concluded, I was three weeks into my thesis year. Impressed with how well Tari Tari had presented its messages, I entered my thesis project with enthusiasm – this year marked the first time since secondary school that I was confident in my ability to perform. In the Health Sciences programme, students complete a thesis project to round out their degree, and three weeks into term, our goal had been to present a project proposal in front of the course coordinator and classmates. Unlike my classmates, who had a four month head start on their projects, I entered September with only a rough idea of what my thesis would entail. However, in the time between the start of term and the proposal presentation date, I had managed to draw on my previous experiences in my lab to design a novel project of my own – having just published my first paper about our lab’s in-house game engine and its flexibility, I decided to extend the work I’d began two years earlier on agent-based renal flow and build it into a multi-scale system that combined mathematical modelling with agent-based approaches. Much as how Tari Tari and its successors encouraged combining approaches from a variety of disciplines to build a magnum opus, I drew on my knowledge of biology and software to suggest how component-based modelling would confer enough flexibility to build anything, with a renal system being an example of a complex system worth visualising. On the day of the presentation, I remember delivering my proposal and smoothly answered questions: in that moment, it felt as though I were selling a start-up’s groundbreaking new idea to VCs rather than outlining a health sciences project to professors. Speaking in front of experts is an intimidating experience, but for me, it dawned on me that where software and simulations were concerned, the cards were in my hand. It was here that I began seeing Tari Tari in a new light – Tari Tari isn’t merely a series about music’s ability to convey messages that transcend linguistic and cultural borders, and the importance of opening oneself up to others around them, but also how important it is to be able to bring in knowledge from other areas in order to improve one’s own problem-solving ability and resilience. P.A. Works has certainly taken this message to heart: following Tari Tari, anime like Sakura Quest, The World in Colours and The Aquatope on White Sand all integrate multidisciplinary approaches elegantly into their stories to create a compelling anime, and the fact that even a decade later, workplace and coming-of-age stories from P.A. Works that employ this style have continued to impress.

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