The Infinite Zenith

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Tag Archives: Anima Yell!

Anima Yell!- Whole-Series Review and Reflection

“Let’s go, Kaminoki! Go for win!” —Kaminoki High Cheer

The Cheer Association begins gaining momentum, as Kohane and the others farmiliarise themselves with basics. They are asked to cheer in a variety of venues for their classmates, including at several basketball games, an opening ceremony for a festival and for Uki’s younger brother’s soccer match. After wondering why Uki would join the Cheer Association, Kana joins the Cheer Association after standing in for Uki during a routine, who’d become injured. With the required five members, the Cheer Association becomes a full-fledged club. The girls recruit Ms. Inukai as their advisor and make Kohane the president, partake in a training camp on the beach and use their new funds to purchase upgraded uniforms. Kohane and the others sign up for a cheer-leading tournament, as well. Here, Hizume learns that her old teammates are glad to find her and wish that she were still with them; they nonetheless wish her the best, and in their performance, everyone comes together to keep Kohane going after she became worried about Hizume. Despite not qualifying in the preliminaries, the girls have a wonderful time and resolve to continue practising for their upcoming events, as well as for another tournament in the future. Anima Yell! was the fall season’s Manga Time Kirara series, and for better or worse, these invariably end up on my watchlist. After three episodes, Anima Yell! gave the distinct impression of simply being Yuyushiki with cheer-leading, but as the series progressed, there was considerably more enjoyment as the Cheer Association began picking up their activity and explored aspects of cheer-leading that made it worthwhile for each of Kohane, Uki, Hizume, Kotetsu and Hanawa.

Anima Yell! ends up being a fun romp through the world of cheer-leading and high school life, as is the case for almost all adaptations of manga published to Manga Time Kirara. However, there was a bit of a surprise for me; I was not anticipating that the series would have something discernible in the way of a theme: Anima Yell! has Kohane and her boundless energy at the forefront. With her cheer and desire to help those around her, Kohane’s presence is strong enough to overshadow the other characters, even the highly experienced Hizume. Anima Yell! is, upon first glance, about Kohane channelling her energy towards helping others through cheer-leading and over time, realising that she’s got support from her friends, is willing to put an effort towards overcoming her acrophobia. However, each of Hizume, Uki, Kotetsu and Hanawa have their own challenges that cheer-leading helps them tackle. In particular, Hizume learns to appreciate cheer-leading from a smaller group, really allowing her to know everyone better. Initially dismissed from her old cheer-leading team for being a non-team player, Hizume comes to realise that she was more focused on the technical details of her performance, than paying mind to those around her, and so, while excelling as a cheerleader, failed as a team member. Working in a smaller team forces Hizume to train Kohane and Kotetsu, as well as organise things with Uki and Hanawa. In doing so, Hizume opens up naturally to her new-found friends and overcomes her own doubts about being alone. Through Anima Yell!, it is shown that the small-team dynamic provides an opportunity to really get to learn about one’s teammates better, and the ensuing friendship can have a profound positive impact on an individual.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Anima Yell! will receive a shorter post, featuring only twenty screenshots taken from various points in the show. In the beginning, a lack of funds means that Kohane and the others need to get creative – their uniforms are hand-made, as are their pom-poms. Their status as an association ends up being a boon for the club, resulting in actions that indicate ingenuity and a chance to take the characters in directions otherwise unexplored were they permitted club status.

  • Kohane’s first objective is to get Kotetsu to join the club, and after much manoeuvring, succeeds in convincing her; their performance in cheering the basketball team sees each of Uki, Kohane and Hizume deliver enough energy to allow the team to win, and inspired, Kotetsu agrees to join.

  • It turns out that Kohane’s acrophobia stems from an incident in her childhood, where she’d fallen out of a tree while attempting to help someone. While the physical pain did not deter her, the fear of worrying those around her had a long lasting impact, and since then, Kohane’s concern about troubling those around her means that she cannot be in high places. With time and effort from the club, Kohane gradually begins to overcome these fears, and she’s able to act as the top of some rudimentary formations.

  • Hanawa is Anima Yell!‘s Sharo Kirima rolled in with Love Lab!‘s Yuiko Enomoto; fiercely protective of Hizume, Hanawa becomes greatly flustered in her presence and reveres her. She is initially disapproving of the Cheer Association, wondering why Hizume went from being a top-tier cheerleader to participating in a club where it is nowhere near as serious as the sort of organisation Hizume might’ve been in before.

  • Uki explains the situation to Hanawa on the school rooftop, but sprains her ankle when she catches a falling Hanawa. Feeling responsible for the situation, Hanawa decides to act as the substitute for Uki when the basketball team requests the Cheer Association perform for their match. During the course of their presentation, Hanawa witnesses firsthand Hizume’s enjoyment, and also rediscovers her own love for cheer-leading. She reluctantly decides to join the Cheer Association, bringing its membership to five and officially giving the group club status.

  • Inukai sensei is the stereotypical instructor, being quite lazy and unmotivated. She refuses the post of advising for the Cheer Club, but the girls manage to persuade her. Like every advisor for clubs that come before her, Inukai sensei is not usually willing to expend energy to help the club out, but when the moment calls for it, she will pull through. In addition, she also supports the girls’ aspirations from the sidelines, revealing that for her laziness, she genuinely does care for the club’s members.

  • Uki suffers from a conundrum when it turns out the Cheer Club is set to perform at her younger brother’s soccer game. Uki’s younger brother, Akane, is not particularly appreciative of cheerleaders, saying they are quite distracting and contribute little to the game, but also remarks that he’s cool with Uki. Struggling to reveal she’s a member of the Cheer Club and will be making an appearance, Uki finally snaps when Akane mentions his dislike stems from cheerleaders flashing their pantsu during some stunts, and reprimands him, saying that cheerleading is far removed from exhibitionism.

  • On the day of the match, Akane finds himself unexpectedly impressed with Uki and the Cheer Club’s energy and stamina; they spur him on, and the coach takes notice, putting him in the starting line for the game’s second half. As the girls continue their cheer, Akane’s resolve strengthens and he scores the game-winning goal. He thanks the Cheer Club and begrudgingly admits that cheerleaders are not so bad after all.

  • Hanawa switches from loud and obnoxious to Kohane, to submissive and flustered when Hizume appears. Having seen so many anime with such a character, I knew that it was only a matter of time before Uki and the others managed to turn things around and help Hanawa overcome her own doubts. As such, where I may have felt an annoyance previously, I now wait for the character to grow and mature. Watching Hanawa become increasingly close with the Cheer Club was rewarding, and in the end, she is Anima Yell!‘s Sharo Kirima, whom I’ve come to appreciate for her role in GochiUsa.

  • While we’re into winter now, Anima Yell! takes things into summer when the Cheer Club goes on a training camp. Although Hizume insists that their objective is practise, and the girls do get a respectable amount of practise in, there is a focus on what everyone does on the beaches under beautiful summer skies. For me, deep azure skies is a hallmark of the summer season in anime, conveying a sense of warmth that the longest days of the year bring.

  • During the training camp, Hizume notices that Hanawa seems to have trouble interacting with her, and is quite unaware that Hanawa’s got a crush the size of a planet on her. Being the most reasoned of everyone, Uki offers Hizume advice, to take things one step at a time, helping the two close their distance. The training camp of Anima Yell! is not particularly fanservice-oriented, and has the characters coming out both on better terms with one another, as well as better equipped to face their challenges.

  • Times change, and most of the folks who’ve previously analysed shows like Anima Yell! in forums have ceased. It’s been a year since we’ve been treated to seminar-style discussions of minutiae in Manga Time Kirara series, such as how economics work in Urara Meirocho, the exam procedures of Hanayamata or whether or not older PCs can run drawing software in Stella no Mahou. I cannot say that I miss these these divergences – they contributed nothing to discussions about the show, but now that they’re gone, it also means I have no need to shoot them down and explain why these individuals misunderstood or misinterpreted something. In each and every case, the answer to their questions was simple and could be explained in two or fewer sentences.

  • Of course, at least one individual has been left with analysing the kanji in everyone’s names and concluded that everyone’s names has roots in an animal name, but watching through the whole of Anima Yell! finds that this has no impact on the story whatsoever. I’ve long found that analysing names has not done me any favours in understanding a show: names like Jack Ryan or Samwise Gamgee do little for helping me gain a deeper understanding of a story. Back in Anima Yell!, the girls’ training camp draws to a close with another successful and fun performance.

  • Having club funds means being able to afford new uniforms, and after spending an entire day at the cheerleading speciality shop, the girls finally agree on a uniform that works for everyone. They encounter twin sisters who were formerly Hizume’s teammates, whose personalities are reminiscent of cats. Their cordial conversation with Hizume foreshadows what her former teammates think of her.

  • On the day of the Cheer Tournament, the whole club has gathered and exhibits nerves to some level. Kohane varies between pure excitement and total fright – between her concern for Hizume’s well-being and her own ability to perform, fear slowly creeps into her day. She ruins a few group photos, and despite her insistence that everything is fine, audiences are keenly aware that Kohane’s not her usual self.

  • As it turns out, Hizume’s old teammates found themselves in disarray after she left and wanted her back, but slowly pulled together and then found their way. Admitting that she’s happy to have seen this change as a result of Hizume’s departure, they also understood just how important Hizume was to them and are happy to see that she’s found her own way again. For Hizume, working with a smaller team has really forced her to be mindful of her teammates, and she apologises to her old team for not being more aware of them. They part on friendly terms and wish one another luck in the tournament.

  • When their performance starts, Kohane immediately falls. Their performance in jeopardy, Hizume, Uki, Kotetsu and Hanawa step in to support Kohane, who realises that her friends will catch her. Her cheering spirit restored, Kohane comes back to help her teammates put on a performance that, despite not having the technical depth of finesse of a more experienced team, one that captures the amount of fun everyone is having in the moment.

  • In the end, the enjoyment that each of Hizume, Kohane, Uki, Kotetsu and Hanawa experiences is very visible, and watching the Cheer Club advance was one of the biggest draws in Anima Yell!: my enthusiasm for the show was waning at the halfway point, as the mid-sections of this series was unremarkable and even dull in a few places, but once Hanawa joins, Anima Yell!‘s spirit is rekindled, prompting me to push through to the end. I’m glad that I did.

  • If and when I am asked, Uki is my favourite character of Anima Yell! – she’s well-rounded, being skilful enough to keep up with Hizume and Hanawa, but is also able to reign in Kohane and Kotetsu. As seen from her reaction to failing to qualify, Uki is also very serious and committed to what she does. Despite this, the girls remark that yes, things were very memorable. Having seen where cheerleading could take them, they resolve to work hard and see just how far into the next tournament they can progress.

  • When everything is said and done, Anima Yell! would earn a B, a 7.5 on the 10 point scale (3.0 of 4) – despite being strictly average, Anima Yell! has plenty of heart, and for me, this counts for something. With this post in the books, I’m officially done with writing about the anime I watched for last year: there are many titles I’ve invariably passed on, and I could return to them at some point in the future (I still need to see if Aobuta lives up to its praises, for example), but for now, with the winter season upon us, a few shows have caught my eye. At this point in time, I express an interest in writing for Kouya no Kotobuki Hikoutai – only one show is on the plate for the present, as my free time has lessened and I’d like to allocate what’s available to blasting bad guys in things like Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash and Battlefield V in addition to writing.

Audiences familiar with the Manga Time Kirara world would seen this countless times in other series; while Anima Yell! may not be particularly novel or exceptional, it is honest, and the end result is a fun story that picks up considerably once the series is under way. The energy and spirits that each of Kohane, Uki, Hizume, Kotetsu and Hanawa bring to the table livens up Anima Yell!; the girls’ cheer-leading performances are surprisingly polished in spite of Kohane and Kotetsu’s inexperience, and while the girls never get to doing the more sophisticated stunts, watching Hizume return to the basics and help bring everyone up proved to be a warming experience that is always a joy to watch for the journey everyone takes to reach the endgame. As such, in spite of Anima Yell!‘s average visuals and aural aspects, the story itself keeps things compelling enough for this one to be watched to completion. Anima Yell! is the sort of anime for Manga Time Kirara fans looking for something relaxing and comforting; beyond this, the nature of Anima Yell! means that it is unlikely to appeal to audiences with a different set of preferences. Finally, I imagine that Anima Yell! will not be seeing a continuation; while the manga is ongoing, I’ve not heard anything that suggests that Anima Yell! is as well-received as something like Gochuumon wa Usagi Desu Ka? or Kiniro Mosaic — this series is not particularly stand-out with its execution or premise, but what Anima Yell! does have is a fun story about growth and being appreciative of those around oneself.

 

Anima Yell!- Review and Impressions After Three

“It’s hard to beat a person who never gives up.” ―Babe Ruth

Kohane Hatoya becomes enamoured with cheer-leading after seeing a riverside performance and decides to take it up when she becomes a high school student. On her first day of high school, after learning that her school has no cheer-leading club, she decides to start her own and decides to recruit experienced cheerleader Hizume Arima. While her initial efforts are unsuccessful, her persistence moves Hizume, who relents and agrees to join. They begin training, although Kohane’s wavering motivation appears to be an impediment. With Uki Sawatari’s assistance, Hizume is able to convince Kohane to keep moving forwards. Kohane longs for Uki to join the cheer-leading club, as well – she sees Hizume’s performance and consents to participate. However, exam season is upon the girls, forcing them to put their club activities on hold while they study. Later, the girls’ cheer-leading club becomes approved as an association, and turn their efforts towards helping fellow classmate Kon Akitsune convey her feelings to her private tutor. This is where we are three episodes in to Anima Yell!, this season’s Manga Time Kirara series that follows Kohane’s journey to become a cheerleader.

Like beach volleyball in Harukana Receive, my knowledge of cheer-leading is very limited, although insofar, this does not appear to be an impediment. Anima Yell! is immediately familiar to folks who’ve seen Manga Time Kirara series previously, and here, the notion of putting a club together is a very well-worn one. Having seen clubs all manners, from light music, to yosakoi, resurrecting a club and embarking on a journey with friends, old and new alike, is a staple in Manga Time Kirara. Messages of discovery, camaraderie and overcoming challenges are universal, and as such, series such as Anima Yell! have well-known outcomes before even the first episode has aired. In Anima Yell!, cheer-leading is the topic of focus; protagonist Kohane has no trouble fitting the role of a cheerleader, possessing all of the energy and very little in the way of physical capabilities. By comparison, her friends are rather more disciplined and physically capable of the role – as their journey progresses, Kohane will learn more about herself and her friends as they build up a small cheer-leading unit. What will be motivation to watch Anima Yell!, then will be the nature of the journey that occurs.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Kohane is Anima Yell!‘s protagonist, and the story proceeds primarily around her journey to focus on something of her own choosing after her longtime friend, Uki, urges her on. Kohane’s tendency to help and support those around her, even at a cost to herself, is her defining characteristic, and she also resembles Angel Beats!‘ Yui with her energy and enthusiasm. By comparison, Uki is more similar to Yuyushiki‘s Yui, who was serious and reserved.

  • Hizume is an experienced cheerleader, and whose performance is what led Kohane to seriously consider cheer-leading. Disappointed that their new high school has no cheer-leading club, Kohane decides to start her own, but invariably, without any talent or expertise, intially finds it difficult. When she encounters Hizume, Kohane goes on a mission of unbridled focus, determined to convince Hizume to join.

  • As it turns out, Hizume was ejected from her old cheer-leading group for excelling; others felt her to stand above them. It’s a situation one might compare to Hinata’s experiences in A Place Further Than The Universe, where Hinata’s performance in track and field spawned jealousy amongst her teammates. A part of Hinata’s struggle was coming to terms with things and making the most of her travels to Antarctica: seemingly an escape, she comes to learn what friendship is anew with Komari, Yuzuki and Shirase.

  • By comparison, Hizume’s experiences created a situation where she became quite worried about losing those near her. After rebuking Kohane’s efforts to recruit her, Hizume realises that she’s, in effect, driven Kohane off, and finds it awkward to speak with her the next day. However, par the course for a Manga Time Kirara series, protagonists rarely hold grudges, and the next day, Kohane continues her pursuit.

  • While enjoyable, and lacking the elements that make it a guilty pleasure, I find that Anima Yell! treads on extremely well-worn territory. As such, there is very little to discuss in the way of thematic elements and big-picture topics this early in the game, in turn corresponding to my difficulties in writing about series such as these consistently. However, simply because I find it difficult to write about a series does not mean the series was lacking, and there are many shows that I’ve enjoyed, that I don’t bother writing about.

  • Anima Yell! has average artwork: settings are very simplistic and flat. This design choice results in many open spaces; it presently results in expanses that the eye lingers upon, creating a sense of emptiness, but there is a reason why landscapes and interiors are simple. As Kohane and her friends get further into cheer-leading, their movement will fill that space, acting as a visual metaphor for how cheer-leading and its associated energy can bring a tangible change to the feel of an environment.

  • Kohane has acrophobia, and is usually unwilling to go anywhere elevated. While acrophobia is no laughing matter, Anima Yell! chooses to represent it as an obstacle that Kohane must overcome en route to becoming a cheerleader, showing her dedication to things. Her initial understanding of cheer-leading is likely equivalent to the average gamer’s understanding of the military, and as such, she makes many mistakes that Hizume is quick to point out.

  • Realising that Kohane is likely to stick it out and be with her, Hizume reluctantly accepts Kohane’s invitation to join the cheer-leading club, and promptly goes about setting up training for Kohane. Today was a bit of a quieter day, and I capitalised on slower things to enjoy a burger and fries from a nearby A&W: of the fast food chains that delivers reasonably good burgers and my favourite fries. I suppose that slice-of-life anime can be considered the fast food of shows: if made to a reasonable standard, they can be good in moderation.

  • A portion of the comedy in Anima Yell! comes from Kohane’s naïveté: she orders cheerleaders’ outfits, not knowing the implications of the source she orders from. The more rational Uki immediately declines to wear them. While she might be afraid of heights, Kohane strives to overcome this fear, and is also shown to be okay as long as she does not have a direct sight of how high up she is relative to the ground.

  • I empathise completely with Kohane’s situation in being inflexible: flexibility is an aspect of fitness that I am guilty of neglecting (I lift for strength and run for endurance), and a well-written article out there states that having the strength to lift things and the endurance to last long doesn’t mean much if one isn’t flexible enough to move their muscles. I stretch before lifting, and warming up before a run or bike ride has helped me to kick higher, but compared to most people, I’m still well-below the norm. It is not a mark of pride that I am more flexible than Kohane.

  • An aspect of Uki’s character that I’m particularly fond of is that, as level-headed as she is, she’s also got a bit of a mischievous side to her personality. Unexpected parts of a character enhance an anime by making the character more multi-dimensional.

  • The pom poms of cheer-leading are completely unrelated to the QF 1-pounder 37 mm autocannon seen in Battlefield 1: here, Hizume provides instruction to Uki and Kohane on making them, after learning that endlessly drilling Kohane with exercises might dissuade her from sticking to cheer-leading. In a way, Uki’s friendship with Kohane, and Hizume’s desire to never be alone results in a bit of an equilibrium that also will lead the two to become friends.

  • The sum of the forces keeping Kohane, Hizume and Uki together result in a dynamic that I don’t think I’ve seen in other slice-of-life series, making it a novel one. Once their friendship is established, Anima Yell! will invariable introduce new characters to disrupt the status quo and keep things fresh. However, before this can happen, Uki must become a part of the cheer-leading club, as well.

  • Old habits die hard, and while Hizume might not want to be a cheerleader any further, the combination of wanting to keep Kohane around and her training means that she has no trouble putting on a show for Uki’s benefit. The girl with long, dark hair is a staple in Manga Time Kirara series – from the protagonist to being support characters, such individuals are serious, proper but also have an unexpected vulnerability. I think Yuyushiki is one of the few exceptions in recent memory; my familiarity with Manga Time Kirara does not go that far back.

  • Uki is moved by the performance, feeling it to be simultaneously cute and cool, and at last, consents to join the cheer-leading club. Uki occasionally runs with her imagination and sees herself or those around her in somewhat embarrassing outfits, lending itself to the series’ comedy.

  • On what Anima Yell! actually means, the title’s representation in Katakana implies a word of foreign origin, and from there, Google-fu finds that anima is Latin for “animating principle”, itself a translation of the Greek term for “soul” or “spirit”. Then, Anima Yell! becomes “Soul Yell”, which is appropriate considering that cheer-leading is really about a sort of coordinated cheer for the soul to drive up motivation. Anima Yell! also lives up to its title in that there is indeed a great deal of yelling and high spirits.

  • When faced with exams, Kohane finds it difficult to study until Uki and Hizume motivate her; with the threat of being unable to pursue club activities, Kohane gives it her all, until Hizume fears that Kohane will drop the cheer-leading in favour of her studies and then asks Kohane to reign it back. The end result is that Kohane gets trampled by the exam and is made to take remedial exams. However, she manages a pass here.

  • Instructor Inukai (given name unknown at the present) is one of Kohane’s instructors, and while appearing strict at times, she eventually lets the cheer-leading club know that they’ve now got enough members to form an association. At least, this is what the translations give: Yuru Camp△‘s translations have been quite variable because of the Outdoors Activity Club’s informal status, and some have yielded “circle”. For me, as long as I can understand that there is a difference (e.g. when a group is operating with a different level of freedom and resources), then the precise translation is not so important.

  • When Kon Akitsune comes to the cheer-leading club with the aim of getting some support for a kokuhaku, the girls immediately set about helping her out, and are successful. Discussions on Anima Yell! are limited right now, although I think that this scene would be a topic of interest, for a remarkable moment where characters are very forward and direct with how they feel.

  • With the cheer-leading club having its core members now, I imagine that upcoming episodes will follow a conventional approach, adding more characters and sending them on familiar adventures, leading up to the big finish when the sum of everyone’s efforts is shown in a titanic final performance. Predictable that Anima Yell! might be, and likely being ill-suited for long discussions, it will still represent twenty minutes every week of light-hearted fun, and for me, this is what counts.

In a manner of speaking, Anima Yell! is initially similar to Yuyushiki in its initial setup, with three central characters whose personalities that share some overlaps. Yuyushiki‘s draw was its unstructured premise, with each of Yui, Yukari and Yuzuki bouncing off one another as they explore random topics and experience high school. The setup in Yuyushiki allowed for very unusual humour to be presented, and aside from its character design, Anima Yell!‘s premise is rather different – there is a focus on cheer-leading, which means that the anime will remain in the realm of the experiences that Kohane and her friends encounter as they build their club out and perform at sports events. Anima Yell! looks to offer a familiar experience on first glance, sticking with the tried-and-true rather than anything novel, although the character setup and cheer-leading elements could also create unique moments, as well. I am not expecting anything too fancy in Anima Yell!; this is a series to share a few laughs about, but beyond this, I imagine that writing about this one could prove quite challenging.