The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

Tag Archives: DICE

Looking ahead to Star Wars Battlefront II and thoughts after the E3

Do it.” —Sheev Palpatine

Following the reveal of Star Wars Battlefront II footage last week, general excitement surrounding DICE’s latest Battlefront title has increased substantially. In its first trailer, Battlefront II showcased a promising new single-player campaign. From the perspective of an Imperial special forces soldier in the aftermath of the Empire’s defeat over Endor as they strive to continue serving Emperor Palpatine and execute his will against the triumphant Rebel Alliance. It’s an uncommon storyline, as most Star Wars games take place from the Rebellion’s perspective – akin to playing as the Third Reich’s Wehrmacht or Imperial Japanse Army in a World War Two shooter, Battlefront II is taking a bold new direction with its campaign, which was noticeably absent from its predecessor. Accompanying the announcement of a single player mode in Battlefront II was the fact that the game’s DLC will follow the Titanfall model: new content will be released free of charge to all players (I imagine that micro-transactions will take the forms of cosmetic items and weapon/equipment unlocks) to avoid dividing the player base (a prevalent problem in Battlefield 1, where They Shall Not Pass servers are often empty). With such a strong start, the EA Play event showcased some multiplayer footage of how the game will look and feel: the match is set in Theed of Naboo.

From the gameplay footage, Battlefront II is certain to deliver a visual and audio treat from a cinematic perspective: like its predecessor, Battlefront II has reproduced the sights and sounds expected of a Star Wars game. Whether it be the distinct report of a Clone Trooper’s blaster or the gait of a Trade Federation B1 Battle Droid, elements from the movie are faithfully portrayed in Battlefront II, along with the environments. Theed is intricate, and designs from the royal palace are incredibly detailed, from the patterns of the floor to the play of light through the building windows. The game mechanics appear to have been given an overhaul: while the UI and handling appear quite similar to those of its predecessor (weapons still overheat, while action cards determine what additional loadouts player have), the game has been modified so players gain more accuracy while firing from first person. Access to vehicles, power-ups and hero classes are now based on performance: players earn points for playing objectives and contributing to their team’s efforts, and points can be used bolster one’s class, spawn into a vehicle and, for the patient player, spawn into battle as a hero. Gone are the days of awarding players randomly the hero class: this is something that is earned, which means there will be no more need to aimlessly wander the map for the hero pickup in place of helping one’s team out. All in all, I look forwards to seeing more of the game: similar to Titanfall 2, it appears that Battlefront II has taken on a formula its predecessor implemented and improved upon it in every way.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • The screenshots in this post were sourced from my time in the Battlefront trial that EA offers: a year ago, on the Friday entering the Victoria Day long weekend, I spent much of the day playing the trial to obtain a better idea of whether or not the game would be worth my while. There’s around ten seconds left in my trial, and after concluding, I switched over to writing about Gundam: The Origin‘s third episode, which had just released. While perhaps not as exciting as the years where I attended Otafest, it is nonetheless nice to have a quieter long weekend, and last year, I was gearing up for the thesis defense.

  • The screenshots I have here are of me playing through the Heroes and Villians mode against bots: my lack of time spent in the game meant that playing against human players would certainly make it difficult to obtain good screenshots, and even on higher difficulties, the heroes can cause destruction against the AI opponents without much difficulty. These screenshots have been sitting on my hard drive for the past thirteen months, but with the recent Battlefront II announcement, the time has come to put these images to good use.

  • The presence of a single player campaign in Battlefront II immediately caught my attention: I purchased Titanfall 2 for the campaign alone (albeit during a sale) and will give the multiplayer a whirl, if only to try and unlock the Tone Titan. I heard there’s a multiplayer mode against just AI opponents, so that could prove to be a nice way of becoming more familiar with the mechanics. If Battlefront II similarly features more AI multiplayer modes on top of the campaign, I could see myself getting more excited about the game.

  • The gameplay footage shown last weekend confirms that Darth Maul, Yoda and Rey will be included as heroes in Battlefront II: the heroes work similarly to how they had previously in Battlefront, able to utilise three powerful abilitie in addition to having increased damage output and resistance. One thing that could be quite nice is the ability to switch up one’s preferred hero abilities, allowing them to customise the hero to their preferences.

  • Another aspect that was not shown but would be a further incentive to buy and play Battlefront II is customisation to almost the same level as seen in Battlefield 3 or Bad Company 2 – being able to modify weapons to fit one play style would both be a powerful incentive for players to explore their options, as well as provide weapon accessories and attachments that one could work towards unlocking. Being able to really fine-tune weapons is what made Battlefield 3 and 4 such a blast: this is noticeably absent in Battlefield 1, and it is the combination of superbly-designed maps with exceptionally fun sniping that keeps me in the game.

  • Whereas my Battlefront beta discussion features posts of me operating exclusively in first person, I’ve heard that players have a much larger advantage if they play in third person owing to improved spatial awareness. In Battlefront, there was no difference in performance in first-person; players merely have a more immersive experience. In Battlefront II, playing in first person will confer superior accuracy: weapon spread will decrease. I imagine that players will remain in first person when shooting at longer ranges and switch out to third person for closer engagements as required.

  • DICE is advertising Battlefront II as a battle across different eras, and while footage of only Theed were shown, I’m hoping that classic maps (Endor, Hoth, Cloud City and Tatooine) are included along with Couruscant, Geonosis, Kamino and Mustafar. Battlefront II‘s 2005 incarnation is long held as the best Star Wars game around: its plot followed a Clone soldier in the elite 501st, and multiplayer featured full-on space combat, split into the Clone Wars and Galactic Civil War periods. If Battlefront II can include these features in conjunction with the events of The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi, it will be one of the biggest Star Wars games since Battlefront II (2005).

  • I am certain that the initial release of Battlefront II will not feature the same amount of content as 2005’s Battlefront II, but as DICE has promised that DLC will be free, it is very likely that the sum of DLC in conjunction with the base game will offer as much, if not more, content than Battlefront II‘s 2005 version. This is quite exciting, although there is one caveat: I imagine that the full game could very well require upwards of 100 GB of storage space.

  • One aspect that was not shown and remains unknown is the presence of full-scale space battles in Battlefront II: besides the Rogue Squadron series, Battlefront II has some of the most extensive space battles of any Star Wars game. To bring that kind of scale into the modern era with present-generation visuals would be a dream come true for many, offering immersion into the Star Wars universe hitherto unparalleled.

  • Looking back at some of the features and gameplay of Battlefront II in 2005, the game was incredibly ambitious and executed its functions quite well, being a marked improvement over its predecessor. Games during this age are characterised by exceptional sophistication far beyond what is par the course for most modern games. Deus Ex (2000) comes to mind: with a detailed combat and stealth system, as well as for placing a large emphasis on player choice, the game runs rings around modern titles despite its age. One of my friends has expressed a wish to see the game remade with modern visuals.

  • Battlefront II will retail for 80 CAD at launch, a non-trivial amount of money. Launching within a month of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, my decision to buy Battlefront II will largely be influenced by my experiences in the beta (which also allows me to know if my hardware can run it reasonably smoothly), as well as videos from my favourite YouTubers (TheRadBrad for the campaign, while LevelCap and JackFrags will guide the multiplayer). What I am looking for in the campaign is a story of reasonable length (ten to twelve hours of gameplay on standard difficulty, with eight hours being the absolute minimum) with diverse level settings and display of features in the game, including flight and space battles.

  • In the multiplayer, I will be looking for a compelling progression system so that levelling up is a journey rather than a chore, that there’s plenty to do while pursuing this journey, and that the time taken to level up is reasonably determined. Battlefield 1 is an example of reasonable levelling times: players who PTFO and contribute to their teams will earn experience reasonably quickly (even without experience boosts). Playing lots of conquest has certainly been why I’ve surpassed my Battlefield 4 level in Battlefield 1, and hopefully, levelling up in Battlefront II will both be of a reasonable rate, while at once offering players with milestones to look forwards to.

  • Assuming Battlefront II satisfies most of my personal requirements, I will be inclined to buy the game. I’m generally quite busy (as evidenced by my extreme tendency to procrastinate whenever entertainment is concerned), so scheduling is another thing on my mind: Battlefield 1 will likely still be going strong for me well into next year.

  • Depending on how things turn out, I may end up waiting for a sale to happen before buying Battlefront II: if the player base has declined too substantially, the game’s core value will lie with its single-player aspects, and a sale will probably net a better value for the game’s single-player. On a somewhat related note, I have a confession to make here: I play Call of Duty games for their campaigns alone and have not touched their multiplayer components at all.

  • This may be a Star Wars post, but I will use the remainder of the screenshots to consider Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus (from here on out, Wolfenstein II for brevity), which was showcased at E3 and set to release this year, as well. Because it releases around a month before Battlefront II, and because I’ve seen games published by Bethesda Softworks go on sale as early as the first Steam sale after launch, it is possible that I could get Wolfenstein II before the year is over at a reduced price. This is how I got DOOM: it was forty percent off during the Steam 2016 Summer Sale despite having launched only a month earlier.

  • The trailer for Wolfenstein II is done in the typical Wolfenstein style, being quite entertaining to watch. Near the end, it showcases Blazkowitz dealing with American resistance members skeptical of his affiliation, and some gameplay that suggests Wolfenstein II could have a new dual-wielding system similar to that of Halo 2‘s, allowing players to pair different combinations of weapons together to wreck havoc on Nazi soldiers. Some folks have taken it upon themselves to express outrage that we’re killing Nazis in this game, but tough beans for them: this is merely a game depicting players challenging a Third Reich in power, and the option to not play the game is always on the table.

  • Chances are that I will buy Wolfenstein II during the Steam Winter 2017 sale if it is indeed discounted. Looking towards other games that caught my eye during the E3 event, Far Cry 5 is definitely on my radar for its Montana setting, and Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown looks amazing. In the latter, I cannot wait to fly the skies of Strangereal on PC for the first time. Both these games are coming out in 2018, and only time will tell as to whether or not I buy them at launch, or else wait for better prices.

  • The release of Battlefront II is set right before The Last Jedi premieres in theatres come December. Having seen the cast list and hearing news that some filming could take place in the Calgary area, in conjunction with trailers, I’m quite excited to see where the latest trilogy will go with its plot. I found The Force Awakens to really be a modernised version of A New Hope, even though the film was overall quite fun to watch.

  • In a way, I enjoyed Rogue One a bit more because it showed the story behind how the Rebels acquired the first Death Star’s plans and the origins of the thermal exhaust port weakness. Having said that, it’ll be interesting to see if the new trilogy will take things in a new direction. For now, December is still a ways off, and aside from Star Wars, there’s also Girls und Panzer: Final Chapter on the horizon. Because it is releasing in six movies, I am hoping that it will follow the Washio Sumi Chapter path and sell Blu-Rays at the theatres, otherwise, the wait to actually watch Final Chapter would be quite considerable.

  • A glance at the calendar shows that it’s been six years since I’ve qualified for my operator’s license, and five years ago, it would have been a month to the release of the K-On! Movie. Time flies, and it never fails to amaze me just how quickly a year’s passed by. With this post, I’ve finally found a use for those Battlefront trial screenshots I’ve taken last May, as well, and I will be returning to scheduled programming in the upcoming week: my plans to revisit The Garden of Words has not changed.

It has been mentioned that Battlefront II could very well suffer as Titanfall 2 did: Titanfall was an excellent game in terms of mechanics, but lacked content, leading player counts to dwindle as there was little incentive to continue playing. While Titanfall 2 surpassed Titanfall in every way, adding a campaign on top of additional content and providing free DLC, player counts remain relatively low because there is an uncertainty amongst consumers as to whether or not the game is worth it. Battlefront II might suffer a similar eventuality, but with a bold new approach to its campaign and a promise to ensure new content is available for all players, in conjunction with the Star Wars brand, it is also likely that Battlefront II will be much longer lived than the 2015 incarnation of Battlefront. My ultimate decision as to whether or not Battlefront II will be worth a purchase will be made once the game’s come out – once I’ve seen some gameplay of the campaign and learn more about the progression system and game balance, it will be easier to make a decision. An open beta could also help provide more information to determine if the game is one that will join my library. With a release date set for November 17, 2017, I look forwards to seeing more about Battlefront II, and in the meantime, it’s also time to get excited about Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. Set to release on October 27, I am almost certain I will buy the game. The only question remaining for Wolfenstein II is whether or not it will be a game worth getting at launch price (guided by the story, gameplay and replay value), or if buying the game during a sale would be a superior choice.