The Infinite Zenith

Where insights on anime, games, academia and life dare to converge

Tag Archives: First person shooter

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare- At the halfway point

“The Internet is for haters. Everyone wants to knock somebody down, but it’s cool.” —Andy Cohen

After repelling the SDF fleet and forcing them into a temporary retreat, Commander Reyes sets out on his assignment, starting by re-capturing the lunar port to ensure Earth is not cut off from supplies. Subsequently, side missions become available, where Reyes and the Retribution can carry out strikes against the SDF forces to steal or recover weapons, eliminate targets of value or else damage SDF assets. All of this leads up to Infinite Warfare‘s halfway point, a mission set in Titan, the largest of Saturn’s moons, in order to destroy a refuelling facility and cripple the SDF’s fuel supply. Combining both infantry combat and aerial dog fights with the Jackals, Infinite Warfare continues to be an entertaining game that presents an opportunity to travel around the different locations of the Solar System in order to defeat a militant faction: whether it be the grey, rolling hills on the moon, the yellow, muggy and hostile surface of Titan, the desolation of Uranus and Neptune or the familiar Earth, Infinite Warfare vividly portrays these settings to give the sense that the player is exploring and fighting in environments that have hitherto remain unexplored, creating a series of worlds that keeps each mission in the campaign novel and free of repetition.

One of the elements I’m enjoying most about Infinite Warfare are the weapons’ versatility and customisations available within the campaign: prior to each mission, players can fine tune their loadout very specifically, outfitting their weapons with the optics and attachments to best fit their play-style. There is also a recommended loadout for folks who simply want to get into the missions without worrying too much about whether or not a particular set of weapons will work. For instance, in Operation Burn Water, the mission to Titan, the recommended loadout is the EBR-800 with suppressor and foregrip, with the suppressed Kendall 44 as a secondary weapon. Given that much of this mission begins as a stealth mission, it makes sense to have suppressed weapons. However, as things progress, the mission invariably goes loud. Thus, I swapped out the Kendall 44 for the Erad, a submachine gun that can alternatively be used as a shotgun. The future setting of Infinite Warfare means that weapons designers have more creative freedom, resulting in remarkably versatile weapons that allow me to play through the campaign without worrying about whether or not I’m carrying the right weapons for the task at hand: in fact, weapons that can transition between two firing modes, like the Erad and EBR-800, are sufficiently adaptable so that I can stick with one weapon and carry a powerful secondary weapon, such as the P-LAW laser weapon or the Spartan shoulder-fired rocket launcher to deal with heavier opposition. Not affecting the game’s difficulty in any way, this ability merely changes how one feels about dealing with the different levels.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • The mission on the lunar port is known as Operation Port Armour, featuring some nifty combat sequences afforded by the fact that the large windows throughout the concourse can be shot out, sending SDF soldiers to their doom. Immediately, the SDF’s actions are made known when some of Reyes’ squad mates mention that the SDF do not take prisoners – they are later seen shooting civilians openly.

  • Reminiscent of both the Principality of Zeon (Mobile Suit Gundam and all Universal Century stories) and Vers Empire (Aldnoah.Zero), the SDF is determinedly presented as an evil antagonist whose entire existence is to wipe out SATO and the UNSA. Snippets of text found throughout Infinite Warfare, and from the death screens note that the SDF is a militaristic entity wholly dedicated to victory, possessing a Social Darwinist ideology and believing that they are the rightful controllers of humanity. With their ideology ruled by ruthlessness and strength, Girls und Panzer‘s Shiho Nishizumi looks like an absolute moderate by comparison, and one “Daigensui” would be likely count the SDF’s beliefs as appropriate.

  • Naturally, anyone with a sense of empathy and compassion would immediately see the SDF as the antagonists, a threat to be dealt with and as such, find them an easy opponent to rally against in Infinite Warfare. A simple, black-and-white approach to determining the factions allows Infinite Warfare to focus on its gameplay and core thematic element of sacrifice. Back on the lunar terminal, I continue pushing through, lighting up SDF forces along the way. I pick up a shield and F-SpAr torch along the way, but being blown out into the vacuum forces me to relinquish these assets.

  • With most of the port cleared out, it’s time to go find a Coast Guard Jackal and engage enemy forces outside. By this point in Infinite Warfare, I’ve learned that energy weapons are slightly more effective against robots than organic targets, as well as that the TTK (time to kill) is a bit higher here than it is in earlier Call of Duty titles: it takes at least a fifth of a magazine to down opponents with body shots.

  • While ostensibly lighter-armoured and more lightly armed compared to the SATO Jackals, I manage just fine with a Coast Guard Jackal here, engaging the SDF Skelters and other vessels alike without much difficulty. Defeating the SDF here returns control of the port over to the UNSA, and Reyes’ team takes off to continue pushing back remaining SDF forces in the area.

  • The first Infinite Warfare trailer depicted the space combat of Operation Port Armour, coupled with the part of the mission involving the infiltration of an SDF destroyer. One YouTube, this video holds the infamy of being one of the most disliked videos of all time, having over 3.5 million dislikes. A part of me wanted to try Infinite Warfare and find good things to say about it just so I could stick it to the folks who hate Call of Duty. Despite being the third consecutive instalment in the main franchise to be set in the future, Infinite Warfare has the most solid storyline and interesting maps.

  • While Infinite Warfare is superior to Ghosts and Advanced Warfare for the most part, Advanced Warfare has a more innovative HUD: weapon and utility counts are projected as AR elements directly onto the weapon in world space, rather than in screen space as with more traditional elements. Infinite Warfare returns to a screen space based HUD that is relatively minimalistic and useful, although like the other Call of Duty titles I’ve gone through, I find myself running out of ammunition and reloading during inopportune moments more frequently than in other shooters owing to the way the game plays.

  • The first of the side missions that I took on was Operation Phoenix, set in an asteriod field near Uranus. The goal is to sneak onboard an SDF cruiser and recover a prototype Jackal fighter armed with laser weapons. With a slower firing rate and higher damage, the laser was developed by SDF teams; the SDF’s emphasis on military means that they are more advanced than SATO forces with respect to equipment, rather like how Zeon was the first to employ mobile suits and Vers had Kataphrakts powered by the Aldnoah system.

  • The second side mission I attempted was Operation Taken Dagger: over Neptune, I participated in the rescue of UNSA engineers and recover a prototype heavy weapon. One of the more entertaining aspects about space combat in Infinite Warfare is the ability to use a grappling hook as a weapon to execute SDF soldiers. This marks the first time since 007: Agent Under Fire where I’ve had access to a grappling hook – the Q-Claw of Agent Under Fire  was remarkably amusing to use in the multiplayer, being able to adhere to any surface and pull a user along quickly to otherwise unreachable places on the map.

  • Stealth is usually the smartest option where available: I snuck around the shadows and used melee takedowns to silently dispatch SDF soldiers, making use of a proximity scan to constantly track where enemy soldiers were. With all of the engineers rescued, the next part of the mission is to recover the prototype P-LAW and make use of it: like all of the heavy weapons, it is an immensely powerful weapon that shreds and is balanced out with its inability to be resupplied from ammunition creates.

  • Operation Safe Harbour involves defending space stations from SDF forces in orbit above the Earth. Beyond the usual engagement of SDF Skelters, there is also a pair of SDF destroyers that need to be eliminated, as well. They possess heavy armour and are bristling with weapons: my strategy was to stay afar and eliminate the weapons first with the 30 mm cannon, before pounding the ships with the 50 mm cannon. It’s a bit of an arduous process, but sustained fire results in a very rewarding sight as the SDF destroyer explodes in a blinding flash of light.

  • On my HUD, it says that I’ve defeated an enemy ace in combat. The aces and other high-value targets are figures instrumental to the SDF, but fighting them in the chaos means that there’s no stage-piece boss battle – they would fully blend amongst the regular forces were it not for an indicator over their person, and while they might be slightly tougher than an ordinary soldier, they can still be downed pretty quickly, bringing to mind how quickly bosses in Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Wildlands are taken out.

  • The last of the side missions I took on before moving on to Operation Burn Water was Operation Pure Threat, set in an asteroid thicket above Europa. What initially looks to be a waste of time, when Reyes finds a derelict SDF vessel, turns out to be an ambush, and in the chaos, I bag yet another elite SDF pilot. In something like Gundam and Aldnoah, figures of importance usually pilot more powerful machines, but the reality is that ace pilots are known for their skill rather than the quality of their weapons. As such, in Infinite Warfare, while ace pilots may manoeuvre more skilfully, they aren’t any harder to shoot down than other enemies.

  • The missions to infiltrate SDF vessels and recover high value items brings to mind the sort of challenges surrounding learning about when Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name is coming out as a home release in Japan. I’ve been keeping an eye on developments, but it seems that news of box office figures, merchandise for sale and general gushing about the film is the only information that exists. There is little doubt in my mind that trying to figure out when this movie will be out on BD is about as difficult as infiltrating an SDF destroyer and stealing a weapons prototype: one wonders what the rationale for being this tight-lipped about the release date is.

  • While Your Name will have to wait for the present, there are fortunately things that can be taken care of in the present, and enjoying Infinite Warfare is one of them. Finally starting Operation Burn Water, I am inserted onto the surface of Titan. It’s a very vivid depiction of what the only moon in the solar system to possess a dense atmosphere looks like: while most of the surface is flat, there are mountains exceeding 1000 meters in height in some places. The game also captures the presence of hydrocarbon lakes and precipitation on Titan’s surface very nicely. Being on Titan also brings to mind a line from Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes, in which “methane clouds rain sodium hydroxide, a caustic alkali!”. Sodium hydroxide is not a known form of precipitation on Titan; methane clouds would simply rain methane in liquid form.

  • With this in mind, the chemical reaction between sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate can undergo a reaction to form methane and sodium carbonate (NaOH + CH3COONa → CH4 + Na2CO3). As we have the reaction, I could probably calculate the reaction enthalpies and determine what the energy for the reaction is, then decide whether or not it is feasible for exotic conditions to produce sodium hydroxide in aqueous form from methane clouds in an environment that humans can survive in without any sort of protection. However, I do not imagine readers are here to learn about chemistry: it’s time to return the discussion to Infinite Warfare. After playing the stealth game and sneaking through SDF-occupied grounds, I clear a landing zone for friendly forces, which bring an allied C12 tank along with some heavy armour. These monstrosities are “a cooler version of E3N”, bringing vast amounts of firepower with them and can absorb an incredible amount of damage. Small arms will not harm them at all, requiring a rocket launcher or F-SpAr torch to take out. Having one in my corner allows hordes of SDF soldiers to be dispatched with ease.

  • After the Olympus Mons appears, the C12 and heavy weapons are decimated. An air strike is the only option, and Reyes takes to the skies once more, shooting down multiple SDF air elements before landing at a terminal to remove the safeties, allowing pressures to reach dangerous levels. Once the facility is cleared, it’s a simple matter of lighting the fuse and watching a rather impressive explosion from the fuelling tower.

  • The EBR-800 has quickly turned into one of my favourite weapons: it doubles as an assault rifle and can be counted upon in a pinch. Looking through my site’s archive, March has been a busy month, featuring 56 percent more posts than February even though I’ve been about as busy at work this month as I was last month. It’s not often that I have time to sit down and relax, but weekends are the time to do so: the weather’s finally beginning to feel like spring, and after stepping out today for some errands, I also enjoyed fried chicken for dinner. A year ago, I was on the flight home from Laval, and although I fell ill shortly after returning, I recovered just in time for exam season to kick in. These days, I’ve got no exams, although my subconscious plainly thinks I’m still a student; one dream I had recently was that I failed to submit assignments for several consecutive weeks, only to begin wondering why I was concerned before waking up.

  • Despite making it back out, Reyes is shot down and left adrift in orbit around Titan with E3N. It’s hauntingly beautiful up here, and E3N’s presence is a reassuring one, keeping Reyes company until the Tigress picks him up. One aspect I’ve not mentioned too much yet is Sergeant Omar’s gradual warming to E3N – despite considering him a disposable tool early on, Omar comes to trust E3N and cracks jokes with Reyes, being a character I’ve come to respect. The characters in Infinite Warfare share a strong sense of camaraderie, allowing me relate and yearn to see what happens next to them next.

After learning that the side missions reset with the completion of a main mission, I’m likely to go back and finish all of the side missions I’ve unlocked so far, having completed Operation Burn Water, before moving onto the next mission. Unlike previous instalments of Call of Duty except maybe Black Ops III, Infinite Warfare has created a new means of approaching missions and encouraging replay of its campaign. Consequently, while the space shooter setting might be viewed as being derivative or unremarkable, Infinite Warfare‘s campaign has proven to be the strongest of the Call of Duty campaigns since the days of Modern Warfare, offering numerous options for players even if the game ultimately is very linear in nature. These directions also mean that, with the new choices available for players, the game will take a bit longer to complete. Consequently, I’m going to switch over to Titanfall 2 and also go through the Call of Duty Modern Warfare: Remastered campaigns in the near future; owing to upcoming events, I would like to complete these games before said event arrives. With this being said, I am not leaving Infinite Warfare behind: most likely, I will resume once mid-May arrives.

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare- Impressions of the campaign after an hour

“This is Admiral Salen Kotch of the Olympus Mons. You are defeated. Death is no disgrace!” -Admiral Salen Kotch

Despite being one of the most maligned installments in the Call of Duty franchise, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare (Infinite Warfare from here on out for brevity) managed to pull my curiosity with its setting and premise, where humanity’s efforts to colonise other locales in the solar system eventually results in the formation of a radical military faction known as the Settlement Defense Front (SDF), who mount an assault against the United Nations Space Alliance (UNSA) to break a long-standing stalemate. The game begins with a botched operation to retrieve a weapons prototype, and in the aftermath, the SDF launch a surprise on the UNSA, crippling their fleet during the Fleet Week celebration events through a combination of hijacking the UNSA’s AATIS guns and through the deployment of the Olympus Mons, the SDF’s flagship that is now armed with the F-SpAr weapon. Despite the efforts of Leftenant Nick Reyes, only two UNSA vessels survive — he is subsequently promoted to Commander and given captaincy of the Retribution, with the mission of delaying the SDF long enough for the UNSA to rebuild their fleet. Through the campaign’s first few missions, I’ve seen the unsuccessful mission to retrieve the F-SpAr, watched the SDF attack on Fleet Week celebrations and have flown into space with the Jackal interdiction fighter, capable of operating in both an atmosphere and the vacuum of space. So far, it’s been a fantastic introduction to Infinite Warfare, and all of the negativity out there surrounding Infinite Warfare appears to have been left behind on the surface as I take flight into the void of space and begin the task of regaining the initiative in a fight with the SDF.

The premise of extremist groups forming shortly after human efforts to colonise space has long been explored as a topic in Mobile Suit Gundam, where the EFSF began contending with the Principality of Zeon as political relations between earth and its colonies decayed. In a manner of speaking, Infinite Warfare appears to be what Mobile Suit Gundam would look like had the weapons and concepts been designed in North America as opposed to Japan, featuring fighter craft in place of humanoid mecha but otherwise share the fundamental idea of a totalitarian regime fighting against a weary democratic system, opening with a surprise attack and placing focus around one ship (the Retribution stands in for White Base and the Nahel Argama). However, instead of watching things, Infinite Warfare places players directly into the boots of a pilot set in a world where there are no exceptionally powerful weapons. The absence of a powerful game-changer such as the Gundam means that Infinite Warfare is aiming to tell a different story about war than Mobile Suit Gundam does — while Gundam aims to show the horrors of warfare, it also strives to discuss the possibility and what can lie beyond war, achieved because of an extraordinary weapon that defeats other weapons. Lacking this, Infinite Warfare is perhaps more cautious in its story, and this is where I am headed now in the campaign, to see what happens next to Commander Reyes and the Retribution.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Even though I know it’s well-crafted skybox, reflective materials and a single directional light, in conjunction with some shaders, the view from Europa’s surface is phenomenal; I spend a few moments admiring it before I proceed with the mission. When I first started Infinite Warfare, I was hit immediately with a hiccough in that the game would freeze up, crash and send me back to my desktop. It plainly was not my computer’s specs, so I did some investigation and found that AVG was causing the issue. Adding the entire directory fixes things, and at last, I find myself ready to begin.

  • The question I can expect of some readers would be why in the world I would even consider, much less go through and play a game like Infinite Warfare. Aside from the fact that I am Infinite Zenith, the honest answer is that I’ve been intrigued by the game’s premise, and the campaign seemed to be a fun adventure. Thus, while some folks may express a certain amount of disgust, yes, I did end up buying the game and I’m enjoying it, so I will be doing talks on this game, although not with the same frequency as I did for each of the war stories from Battlefield 1.

  • The weapons in Infinite Warfare are quite foreign to me despite being derived off modern firearms. I’m wielding the NV4 here, the default SATO assault rifle. With low recoil and a slower firing rate, the weapon is a ballistic type, meaning it can punch through walls. The weapon players equip has a variable magnification holographic sight and a suppressor, reflecting on the operation’s covert nature.

  • The secondary weapon players have access to is the FHR-40, a ballistics-based submachine gun resembling the FN P90. With a large magazine and high rate of fire, the weapon is countered with weaker rounds and higher recoil. Moving swiftly through the facility and clearing out any SDF forces, the seventh SCAR team quickly makes its way to where the F-SpAr prototype is. Players control Dan “Wolf” Lyall in this mission.

  • One of the heavy weapons in Infinite Warfare, the F-SpAr torch is a man-portable version of the F-SpAr directed energy weapon and is the only weapon that can damage the C12 bipedal tanks that appear. The beam emitted by the weapon can lock onto enemies and explode organics into a red paste; the weapon’s damage output is immense, but so is its firing rate (it can burn through an entire magazine in seconds). Despite their efforts, Lyall’s team fails their mission and are ultimately executed by Kotch’s men.

  • The Geneva, Switzerland of the future is filled with skyscrapers; beautifully rendered here, the combination of a cityscape with large battleships gives a sense of scale that provides an impressive backdrop. E3N is introduced here, and I immediately take a liking to his personality, which gives the sense of being both reliable and having a witty character that adds much to lighten up the atmosphere in what is otherwise a very serious-feeling game.

  • After the dropship I’m riding is shot down by the AATIS network, Reyes finds himself crashing into a shopping centre where SDF forces have landed; they begin shooting civilians, but before Reyes and Salter can be killed, Reyes is given the Kendall 44 sidearm and takes out two SDF soldiers. I immediately set about finding a primary weapon. The first weapon that I encountered was the Karma-45, which resembles the Kris Vector 45 ACP.

  • While there are skyscrapers all around, Reyes is shot down over the older districts of Geneva, as evidenced by the buildings here. SDF soldiers all around begin massacring civilians, and one aspect of the game that unsettled me was when I accidentally fired upon what appeared to be a civilian crossing my sights, killing them. However, even with this occurrence, the game itself did not end, standing in contrast with shooters that enforce a do-no-harm approach.

  • One feature in Infinite Warfare that I particularly like is the grenade cooking indicator, which shows how long one has before the grenade will go off. Because enemies will try to vacate the blast radius of a grenade, cooking one will give them much less time to react. The feature was added in Call of Duty: Ghosts, which had a few space missions but otherwise looked unremarkable. I ended up passing over this one, and from the sounds of things, Ghosts proved quite unpopular.

  • Here, I am equipped with the Volk, a directed-energy assault rifle that resembles the AK-47 in design. Having a high damage but low accuracy and rate of fire, the weapon is quite commonly found in-game. Insofar, I’m not too sure what the precise difference between energy weapons and ballistic weapons are: I’ve heard that energy weapons can regenerate ammunition in their magazines over time but cannot penetrate surfaces, whereas ballistic weapons are more powerful and can punch through surfaces.

  • Here, I wield the RAW light machine gun, pushing through the burning streets of Geneva en route to the AATIS control station. Owing to the way the weapons work in Infinite Warfare work, it stands to reason that it’s a good idea to have an energy weapon and a ballistic weapon so one can be ready for most situations. In general, I always stick with a good all-around weapon, like an assault rifle, and then pair it with any other weapon with a more specialised role.

  • An SDF gunship makes it difficult to close in on the AATIS control facility, but fortunately, one has access to some friendly close-air support, which will sweep through the area and clear out large numbers of enemies very quickly. With this feature in mind, I pushed up the hill and hid in a downed dropship while awaiting for the support to come back online after taking out ground infantry.

  • Designating the SDF gunship as a target is the only way I can think of for taking it out quickly: other mechanisms are ineffective or will expose one to the elements, since I don’t think there are any MANPADs conveniently hanging around for players to use. Once this threat is neutralised, players enter the facility and regain control of the AATSI guns, learning that there is a spy, Akeel Min Riah, an SDF agent responsible for sabotaging the UNSA. After Riah is apprehended, Reyes and the other SCAR operatives take to the skies.

  • The transition from boots-on-the-ground gameplay to taking control of a spacecraft is remarkably smooth, and if I had to guess, I imagine that the cutscenes incorporate some trickery to give the sense of multi-scale; through my research, I realised that true multi-scale will likely remain unattainable with current generation technology owing to the allocation of resources in order to smoothly transition from one scale to another. Instead, various sleight of hand techniques, such as altering the scale of objects and spaces, are used to convey differences in scale.

  • The first space combat sequence of Infinite Warfare is ferocious and fast-paced. One of the features that proved to be unexpected was how the Jackals handle in flight. Movement is more similar to walking than flying, similar to the Banshees of Halo, and so, I found that it makes more sense to have standard mouse look directions while in flight, rather than the inverted that I prefer for conventional flight controls.

  • The “dog fight mode” mechanic from Ace Combat: Assault Horizon appears in Infinite Warfare, allowing players to lock onto fast-moving enemies and have the autopilot steer so that they may concentrate on shooting. The mechanic was a bit of a contentious point, but it’s straightforwards to shoot down enemy fighters without it: to those folks who dislike it, there’s nothing stopping them from simply not using it. Further to this, it turns out that higher difficulties remove this ability entirely, forcing players to depend on a sure aim to shoot down SDF fighters.

  • While we are on the topic of Ace CombatAce Combat 7: Skies Unknown was recently announced for PC. There’s no concrete release date, but the game is powered by the Unreal Engine and set in Strangereal, making it the first-ever Ace Combat game set in Strangereal to be on PC. The game’s a little more than half finished by this point in time and is likely to come out later this year; I’m excited and might pick it up shortly after launch if the PC version proves to be well-received. Back in Infinite Warfare, I pummel an enemy cruiser here with the 50 mm cannon, eventually turning it into a glowing pile of wreckage.

  • The sudden arrival of the Olympus Mons was a bit of a shock and changes up the tenour dramatically: listening to the radio chatter, a sense of concern is conveyed when Salter and the others note that nothing the SATO forces have is effective against the super-carrier. However, exhibiting the qualities of a capable leader, Reyes orders his forces to concentrate fire on the vessel even as it destroys a SATO vessel in one shot. This action is reminiscent of Théoden King, who rallied his men and ordered them to “reform the line” when the oliphants appeared.

  • These overwhelmingly large beasts instill fear in their enemies through their size, but in giving his orders, Théoden forces his men to rally and regroup before fear kicks in, causing discord. His decision to take them head-on might be questionable from a tactical perspective, as it would maximise casualties, but from a strategic perspective, was probably a better move, since the act would show the Haradrim that their greatest weapon, fear, would not be efficacious here. Returning to Infinite Warfare, the Olympus Mons is the largest and most powerful warship ever built in this universe, with a length of 927 meters. Reyes hands control over to Ethan and things momentarily becomes a rail shooter, where the only goal is to damage the ballistic cannons on the Olympus Mons.

  • The Retribution executes a tactical collision (really a more professional way of saying “we’re ramming it”), forcing the Olympus Mons to retreat. In the aftermath, Reyes returns to the Retribution and learns of the extent of the damage that the SDF has inflicted. He is promoted to commander and tasked with keeping SDF forces at bay while the SATO fleet regroups and rebuilds. Speaking freely, I’m highly excited to push forwards with the campaign after the first set of missions, but the unexpected arrival of the Kiniro Mosaic: Pretty Days OVA will require some minor adjustments to my schedule so I can get a talk out on that soon.

An hour into Infinite Warfare, and I’ve been quite pleased at how smoothly the game handles, both with respect to the boots-on-the-ground aspects and the sequence involving Jackal combat. I’ve got no gripes about the gameplay itself, and note that while I did have a bit of trouble starting the game (the fix was adding the entire Infinite Warfare directory into the exceptions for AVG), once things got started, it has been a solid experience. Gunplay is crisp and responsive, more so than any Call of Duty I’ve previously played, and the set pieces are appropriate. From these experiences insofar, I’m enjoying the campaign and its presentation of an interactive variant of the Mobile Suit Gundam story. There might be no Newtypes or mobile suits, but Infinite Warfare‘s first few missions give an excellent sense of what this game’s campaign is about. I am very excited to experience where things go next, and while I’ve only got a minimal interest in the multiplayer, I can say for sure that this game is not one that is deserving of the negativity and vitriol that would better be directed towards more constructive activities.

Nothing Is Written: Reflections on the Battlefield 1 Campaign

“Men have looked upon the desert as barren land, the free holding of whoever chose; but in fact each hill and valley in it had a man who was its acknowledged owner and would quickly assert the right of his family or clan to it, against aggression.” —T.E. Lawrence

Bedouin rebel Zara Ghufran is working directly in the employ of legend Thomas Edward Lawrence, fighting to undermine the Ottoman Empire and their occupation of the Arabian Peninsula. Ghufran sneaks into the heavily-defended wreckage of a derailed train to retrieve a manual containing Ottoman communication protocols, and is caught by Tilkici. At the last moment, she is rescued by Lawrence, learning from Tilkici during interrogation how to summon the armoured train, the Ottoman Empire’s secret weapon. Ghufran sets out to send three messages and infiltrates Ottoman territory to do so, but before she can send the final message, she is captured again by Tilkici, who had escaped from Lawrence. Before he can execute her, she manages to kill him and returns to Lawrence; they decide to mount an assault on the armoured train. Ghufran destroys the railway to slow the train down, and together with other rebels, they manage to defeat the train in a titanic battle. In the aftermath, Lawrence has set his sights on targets in the Suez area, and feeling that Ghufran had fulfilled her revenge, invites her to participate. The last of the campaign missions in Battlefield 1, “Nothing is Written” shows daring in the face of overwhelming danger: it’s the classic David versus Goliath story as the rebels take on a seemingly invincible leviathan, and functionally, serves to show players that, while the behemoths in Battlefield 1 are titans to be reckoned with, they’re certainly not invincible — sufficient teamwork and firepower are often enough to deal with behemoths.

The final campaign mission in Battlefield 1 is perhaps the most open in terms of its gameplay, and its second act greatly resembles Battlefield: Bad Company 2‘s “Sangre del Toro” mission similarly featured three distinct waypoints to visit and gave player full choice with respect to which destination to complete first. Set in a large open area, efficient traversal becomes necessary unless one wishes to walk, and so, it becomes imperative to make good use of vehicles to get around. Both missions stand out as being set in wide expanses of desert where players are free to explore to some extent, setting the missions apart from the more linear progressions the Battlefield campaigns are wont to present. Besides bringing back memories of “Sangre del Toro”, “Nothing is Written” also gives players an incredible experience in its final act: the goal is to take out the armoured train after clearing out a village of hostile forces. While seemingly difficult to do so on account of superior enemy numbers, a suppressed bolt action rifle suddenly made the mission much more straightforwards, allowing Ghufran to silently dispatch the entire camp without being noticed. The game subsequently recommends the use of the field gun emplacements to damage the armoured train; the train’s heavy bombardment notwithstanding, I managed to disable most of its anti-personnel weapons, then ran up to the train and destroyed it using dynamite. It was a highly engaging mission that acts as an exciting end to the Battlefield 1 campaign, and with “Nothing is Written” now in the books, I will focus my attention towards the multiplayer.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • There’s a certain mystique about movies set in deserts made during the 1960s and 1970s (Lawrence of Arabia and The Spy Who Loved Me come to mind): beyond these movies, deserts also remind me of Break Blade and Sora no Woto, the latter of which was a particularly enjoyable anime that I have plans to revisit in the near future. However, this is not a reminiscence post about things like Sora no Woto and so, I’ll be going back on mission to discuss Battlefield 1‘s final mission.

  • With the expertise that DICE has gained in rendering environments like Tatooine in Star Wars: Battlefront, it is not particularly surprising that even the desolate dunes and cliffs of the Arabian desert look highly detailed. However, here, there are no Imperial Stormtroopers or AT-STs to engage: instead, Ghufran’s goal in the first act of “Nothing is Written” is to reach the marked train car.

  • Ghufran is outnumbered and out-gunned, but as Lawrence narrates, attacking as one allows for stealth to be utilised. I imagine that it is possible to complete this first section using a purely stealth driven approach, and initially, I was successful. After carefully making my way behind the train and acquiring a suppressed M1911, I carefully took out nearby soldiers. However, owing to the density of the enemies, I was eventually spotted.

  • While I was equipped with a Gewehr 98 and M911, I managed to find a Lewis gun. This made it easier to go loud, and so began a very familiar procedure of attempting to be stealthy, then having my cover blown and being forced to  shoot everything up. While the infantry are not too difficult to engage, several soldiers will make a beeline for the mounted MGs. These can lay down quite a bit of fire and damage Ghufran quickly, but dealing with them clears out the entire area, leaving Ghufran free to retrieve the code manual.

  • The multiplayer, while offering dynamic weather in its maps, do not provide night as a time of day to play under. This makes sense from a gameplay perspective: lacking FLIR and IRNV technologies means that engaging other players could prove quite chaotic. In the campaign, however, this is less of a concern and adds to the challenge of a mission. Consequently, it was quite enjoyable to fight through the night sections of the different war stories.

  • The second and third acts of “Nothing is Written” both look like they utilise a similar, if not the same, map as the multiplayer’s Sinai Desert. Games reusing assets for their single player and multiplayer components are not uncommon: 007 Nightfire is a fine example of this, where most of the maps from the campaign were modified to work as multiplayer maps. However, in the case of something like Battlefield 1, powerful engines like Frostbite mean that, by fine-tuning lighting and other subtle details, the dynamic of a map changes completely to suit the atmosphere required, whether it be a lone wolf sneaking about or a squad of soldiers fighting to control flags on the map.

  • The second act in “Nothing is Written” can be completed in six different ways, although on my playthrough, I opted to go with the one that involves the shortest distances. At the end of each campaign level, there’s a post-game report that indicates how many field manuals, challenges and difficulty points were collected, and generally, I completed the odd challenge or two for each of the acts in the campaign.

  • I may go back to play through the campaign again in the future on maximum difficulty while trying to collect everything at some point in the future, but for now, my attention rests solely on the multiplayer. In recollection, I think that I’ve said that I’d replay several games to complete their campaigns more wholly, including that of Wolfenstein: The New Order and Valkyria Chronicles.

  • It’s a full moon as I sneak around the different Ottoman-held installations; the last full moon a month ago was a supermoon, and the next full moon is a week from now. A few nights ago, I dreamt that we could see the dark side of the moon, but scientific knowledge states that it’s not likely, given that the moon is tidally locked with the Earth. That is to say that the moon’s rotational period is the same length as its orbital period; this arose owing to gravitational interactions between the moon and Earth.

  • This is the last time I will have an image of Ghufran riding a horse to move swiftly between the different outposts, and with the moon behind me, this is the darkest screenshot I’ve got for the entire post. While a little unwieldy at times, the horse is the best way of moving to destinations. Even if one loses their horse to enemy fire, there are a few saddled-up horses at each point, making transportation reasonably straightforwards. I wonder if anyone has tried to walk the distance between each of the bases.

  • I would have loved to have a proper scoped bolt action rifle, plus some explosives at the ancient ruins, since there are a handful of snipers hanging about, plus some armour. At the weapons depot and the village, any weapon will do the trick: the goal is to take out the commander and obtain a satchel from them containing the message. This is the only other place in the campaign where pigeons are used for communications, and I note that I’ve yet to play the war pigeon game mode of the multiplayer.

  • Regardless of the order that Ghufran completes the objectives in, Tilkici will appear and knock her out. She manages to kill him in the middle of the desert, but by this point, the armoured train has already begun routing allied forces. Such vehicles were not historically used by the Ottoman Empire or their allies, but Austria-Hungary, Russia and Great Britian had trains of their own: the Austrian-Hungary armed forces deployed theirs against the Italians, while the British trains saw combat at the First Battle of Ypres in 1914. Later British trains were constructed to defend Great Britian.

  • Camped out over an Ottoman outpost with a suppressed bolt action rifle, I managed to take out all of the guards without attracting any attention to myself, and dealt with the sentry using anti-tank grenades. The trick here is to take one guard out while the other isn’t looking, just as Captain MacMillian suggests to Lieutenant Price in Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. A bit of patience and steady aim is the way to go for this mission, as my first attempts to go loud ended in death.

  • Here’s a curious bit of trivia concerning armoured trains: the Canadian armed forces had their own armoured train during the Second World War. Designed to defend against a possible Japanese invasion, the train, dubbed the No. 1 Armoured Train, was equipped with a 75 mm gun, two Bofors 40 mm guns, and could accommodate a full infantry company. It was deployed in 1942 and decommissioned in 1943.

  • In order to facilitate a successful assault, Ottoman artillery trucks must first be destroyed. The fastest way to do so is to acquire some dynamite, plant a charge by the vehicle and then detonate it. Doing so while under fire is ill-advised, and during my playthrough, I chose to eliminate the enemies first so that there air would not be filled with hot lead while I was trying to complete the objective.

  • Once all three vehicles are smoldering wrecks, the armoured train itself will appear. Armed with a mortar and a variety of weapons, the train is impervious to most forms of attack. There are several field guns strategically placed around the camp, and making quick tracks to the appropriate one can allow Ghufran to get off several shots before the train gets its mortar online. Each shot on normal takes away around a twelfth of the train’s health, but once fired on, the train will target the player’s current position.

  • In the chaos of battle, allied rebels will support the player, although being only equipped with small arms, they won’t be of much help against the train or Ottoman aircraft supporting the train. Once enough damage is done to the train, it becomes immobilised, and by this point, I would recommend having anti-armour equipment of some sort, since the train will have either eliminated the field guns in the right position to deal the finishing blow, or else the train is in a position not reachable by the remaining field guns.

  • The option that I took was the use of dynamite: hiding in a crater left from a mortar round, I waited for a gap in the weapons’ firing, then ran up to the train and put down the remaining dynamite I had. It was a mad scramble to get out of the blast radius, and at last, I was in a position to finish the train off. I hit the detonator…

  • …and the train detonated spectacularly. The amount of firepower the armoured train brings to the table is staggering, making this mission one of the most difficult ones to finish, but it was superbly rewarding to complete, showing that persistence and quick thinking allows for even a behemoth to be overcome. In the multiplayer, the addition of teamwork means that behemoths definitely are not overpowered, and while they can close the score gap between the losing team and winning team, by the time they appear, most folks focus on eliminating the behemoth.

  • Totalling some five-decimal-five hours, the Battlefield 1 campaign is short but immensely enjoyable. I remark that I would have liked to try Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare‘s campaign out, as well, but given that I’m unlikely to ever consider playing multiplayer in Call of Duty even if it is designed for my preferred run-and-gun style of play. There are numerous reasons for this, but that is a topic for another time. With Battlefield 1‘s campaign now complete, all I have left is Deus Ex: Mankind Divided‘s campaign to finish, and marking the first time I’ve completed not one, but three titles the year they came out. All told, 2016 has been an excellent year for games, and I’m glad to have had the opportunity to play through the biggest titles within the realm of my interests.

It took on average around an hour to play through each of the campaign missions (some missions were longer and took upwards of eighty minutes, while the shorter ones only took forty), so after around five-and-a-half hours in the campaign, I’ve finished all of the war stories that Battlefield 1 has to offer. The campaign ultimately resembles a war anthology in its presentation, showing glimpses of the battles and the characters that fought them, ranging from new soldiers to swindlers and everything in between. Overall, Battlefield 1‘s campaign aimed to show that, as per the game’s tagline, there is indeed a human being behind every weapon and bullet in warfare, and that everyone who fought in the Great War had their own stories to tell. With an estimated 17.7 million casualties, the number of dead or wounded was staggering, resulting in the loss of a whole generation: the impact the Great War had on the period was immense, and reshaped the world. Battlefield 1‘s campaign, though a fictional representation of this war, nonetheless succeeds in suggesting that the human cost of warfare in general is unacceptably high. It marks a departure from previous Battlefield games, which were purely for entertainment, and in choosing to step in this direction, DICE manages to paint a compelling perspective of the dawn of contemporary warfare.

The Runner: Reflections on the Battlefield 1 Campaign

“Age is no guarantee of efficiency.”
“And youth is no guarantee of innovation.”
—Q and James Bond, Skyfall

Veteran message runner Frederick Bishop encounters Jack Foster, who claims he is Bishop’s new charge. Despite his initial doubts about Foster’s capabilities, he consents to mentor Foster on the condition that Foster does not participate in any active combat. The fifth mission begins with Bishop storming the beaches in the Gallipoli Campaign and capturing a strategic location on the hill, and the next day, Bishop volunteers to run a message in Foster’s place, learning that the British forces intend to retreat under heavy artillery fire. After returning to their headquarters, Bishop learns that Foster has participated in an attack against Ottoman forces and sets out to retrieve him. Upon finding Foster, Bishop decides to cover his and the wounded’s escape by storming a fortress; Bishop orders Foster to fire a flare to signal when they’ve suceeded in escaping. While Bishop’s one-man operation is successful, he is wounded and fails to escape the British artillery, losing his life in the process. Perhaps the greatest Ottoman campaign of the Great War, it resulted in the Allied forces withdrawing and led to the Turkish War of Independence, resulting in the birth of the modern nation of Turkey. It’s a chapter in World War One’s history that I’m not too familiar with, although like the other campaigns far removed from the Western Front, these battles had a major impact in shaping the world during the Inter-War period.

The message conveyed in Battlefield 1‘s fifth campaign mission is the idea that life and death on the battlefield occurs independently of experience and skill. Joining with the intent of experiencing glory, Foster soon learns that death is indiscriminate; the difference between him and Bishop is that the latter is well aware of this and has accepted this, whereas Foster is green and thus, grows fearful in the face of death. In their short time as mentor and student, Bishop instructs Foster in fundamentals, passing along his knowledge. As a result, Foster is able to rescue Bishop during a tense moment during the campaign, but ultimately, in spite of his own experience, Bishop is not able to survive the battle. This harsh reality is thus driven home by “The Runner” to reiterate that many men, both experienced and inexperienced, were at the mercy of events around them, bringing to light yet another darker side of conflict that far eclipses the prospect of glory. By the time of the Great War, innovations in weapons meant that there was no glory, just death. The ensuing casualty numbers were a sobering reminder of how technology allowed for more efficient slaughter of fellow humans compared to past wars, and this resulted in the First World War being dubbed “The War To End All Wars”; in retrospect, there is a degree of irony in this moniker, since World War Two became an even more widespread and devastating conflict a mere two decades later.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • “The Runner” is broken up into three acts, with the first involving a Normandy-style landing of the beaches by British forces. The invasion of Gallipoli marked the first operation that would shape later amphibious landings: such campaigns opened with sustained artillery bombardment from naval vessels, followed by the deployment of soldiers to capture and secure coastal regions, paving the way for a much larger force to be deployed.

  • As the first example of a modern amphibious landing, the Gallipoli operation involved both air and naval support. Inside the confusion, Bishop must make his way up the cliffs and capture a point. There’s a combination of close quarters and distance combat, and initially, Bishop is armed with a SMLE MKIII optical for longer range engagements. A Model 10-A is available for dealing with infantry at close quarters. Here, I use a rifle grenade to neutralise a machine gunner.

  • The Ottoman soldiers man machine guns and can be a bit bothersome to deal with, since they have implausibly good accuracy. I found that hiding in the bushes and carefully lining up a shot to pick them off is probably the best option: anything else, and Bishop will be shredded. Once all opponents are dispatched, there are no more threats, allowing Bishop to move forwards towards the capture point.

  • The Model 10-A becomes an invaluable asset, as it can one-shot anything that moves in close quarters, making it best suited for handling opponents on the capture point. However, for the occasional enemy one encounters en route to the capture point, the Model 10-A can also be relied upon in a pinch. It’s said to be the best shotgun in the multiplayer, and so far, I’ve been using it extensively in TDM for the assault class.

  • One of my readers remark that the M1903 Experimental is probably the best weapon for scouts who prefer playing in closer quarters: equipped with the Pederson Device, which replaces the bolt and allows the weapon to fire .30 caliber pistol rounds. Dealing significantly less damage than bolt-action rifles, the Pederson Device equipped M1903 has a much higher firing rate and less recoil, transforming the weapon into what is essentially a long-barreled pistol.

  • If I do pick up the scout class (which will come the day I want to unlock the Kolibri pistol), I imagine that I’ll probably be better served getting good with any one of the bolt-action rifles and sticking to it, while playing rush or other game modes where opponents are less likely to sneak up on me: I heard that the M1903 experimental’s pitiful damage means that some sidearms, like the Frommer Stop, can out-perform it at close quarters, and moreover, one would likely get Carpal Tunnel Syndrome from using the weapon too much. Foliage in Battlefield 1 is on par with that of Crysis 3 in terms of detail and density, but I’m getting much better frame rates in Battlefield 1 than I did with Crysis 3.

  • In the campaign, on normal difficulty, body shots with the bolt-action rifles seem to be a one hit kill. Having a bolt-action rifle confers the most authentic World War One experience in Battlefield 1 compared with the other prototype automatic weapons; it would be quite nice if there were dedicated game modes for reproducing the sort of warfare seen in the Western Front, where each class can only equip bolt-action rifles.

  • There would have to be an all-class bolt-action rifle for such a game mode, and that could get interesting with respect to balance. Back in the campaign, the details in the bathhouse are intricate, and I found myself admiring the little details inside. The full Turkish bath experience is an intricate one that became popular in Victorian England: it involves hanging out in a warm room, moving on into a hot room, followed by a full-body wash, massage and cooling off in a cool room.

  • I frequently mention this, but it never fails to amaze me how quickly time’s flown by: it’s now December, and we’ve put up our Christmas decorations in preparation for this year’s festivities. This year, we’ve had a heavy snowfall on the day the tree went up, and while it’s made driving to the dōjō to help out with a kata tournament that much more tricky, it also means that the landscape’s become a winter wonderland.

  • After spending most of the level with the Gewehr 98 Infantry, I find a sniper variant that comes with a high magnification scope for long range shooting. With clean crosshairs and a smaller housing than the marksman, it’s probably the best version of the Gewehr 98. One of the challenges about picking which weapon to purchase in the multiplayer with war bonds would be knowing which weapon variant has which optics: I’m generally not a fan of the marksman optics on the bolt action rifles owing to their larger, more obstructive housing, but they do not cause scope glint.

  • I’m actually not too fond of running the cavalry class in the multiplayer of Battlefield 1, since their horses seem a little more unwieldy than other vehicles. Programmed with a decision tree that allow them to perform basic terrain negotiation, as well as jumping over short obstructions and refusing to move off cliff faces and into deep water, horses are rather more complex than any vehicle in earlier Battlefield games. In the fifth campaign mission, horses are an excellent way to returning to distantly-spaced objectives.

  • The final act of “The Runner” also happens to be the most combat driven, and now, starting with the Gewehr 98 Sniper, plus the Model 10-A, I’m ready to storm the fortress as a one-man army. Stealth hardly matters here, and I chose to shoot anything that moved. With that being said, it is quite possible to take a stealth approach and sneak past all the enemy forces, but now that I’m armed with cool guns, it would seem a waste not to use them.

  • Compared to the more vivid colours seen in older Battlefield titles, the saturation in Battlefield 1 is a bit more restrained. The end result of this is that enemies in both the campaign and multiplayer become a little more tricky to spot, but otherwise, serves to elevate the photorealistic quality of the graphics in the game.

  • According to the in-game documentation for the Model 10-A shotgun, the German forces protested their use as being inhumane despite making use of chemical weapons during the war themselves. In a bit of irony, players themselves have remarked on how powerful the Model 10-A is in the multiplayer: it is the perfect weapon for close quarters maps, and can down some enemies even at moderate ranges.

  • Armed with two kickass weapons, I ascent to the fortress gates and prepare for the largest battle seen yet in this war story. I remark that as of now, I’ve yet to hear anything about Kimi No Na Wa with respect to its home release. Anime News Network only discloses the box office totals for the movie, and there’s been a great deal of commotion about how the movie was selected for an Academy Awards nomination.

  • While exciting news, my main interest is on when the movie is able to come out on Blu Ray: I was able to watch it under some interesting circumstances, but it would be nice to have a copy of my own at a fantastic resolution such that I can do a proper discussion of the movie. I imagine that there’s a six-month gap between the theatrical release and home release: Children Who Chase Lost Voices From Deep Below, Shinkai’s last work, released with a similar pattern and despite being a fantastic work, garnered none of the excitement of Kimi No Na Wa.

  • On that note, I’ve also been keeping an eye on Kiniro Mosaic: Pretty Days — it’s a special OVA dealing with the cultural festival, and strangely enough, was a theatrical release despite its short runtime of a single episode spanning thirty minutes. Most OVAs tend to see theatrical releases if there are multiple episodes (Strike Witches: Operation Victory Arrow and Tamayura: Graduation Photo come to mind as examples): I imagine that there could be a three-month wait for this one to be available, and a special for Gochuumon wa Usagi desu ka??, unconfirmed for release somewhere in March-April 2017, might see a similar pattern.

  • Back in Battlefield 1, I’ve finally gotten to the last part of the last act and have cleared out the courtyard of most enemies. By this point, I’ve largely exhausted the Gewehr 98’s ammunition and was made to switch to a Cei Rigotti optical in one of the nearby weapon crates.

  • Clearing out the courtyard was made challenging by the fact that flame troopers will appear. Shooting them in their fuel tanks will do the most damage, although when things get hectic, I usually just unload an entire magazine into them after stopping, dropping and rolling to minimise or avoid fire damage. I’ve heard that elsewhere on the ‘net, folks are in the midst of yet another difficult Kantai Collection seasonal event, and going from their remarks, I am glad not to be them, where instead of players going “[name of ship] GET!”, they’re getting rekt, instead.

  • This is one of the reasons why I prefer playing shooters. They don’t require quite as much of an investment for casual folks like myself, and can be quite fun when one pulls off ridiculously cool stunts in either a campaign or multiplayer. For this last figure, it turns out that there’s also a 12G shotgun lying around here, but because I found it after clearing the area, I never made use of it. This brings the fifth mission’s discussion to a conclusion, and I’ll be returning soon to conclude my thoughts on the Battlefield 1 campaign. After that, it’s onwards to the multiplayer and my impressions of it, having reached rank 14 since I started playing it back in late October.

I’m now down to the last mission in Battlefield 1; the campaign has definitely felt like reading a war anthology relating different snippets and accounts of the different personae in World War One. Based wholly around infantry combat, “The Runner” comes across as being a run-of-the-mill mission in comparison to earlier missions in Battlefield 1, but nonetheless remains quite distinct and memorable in its own right for the dynamics between Bishop and Foster. This mission also marks the first time where I’ve been able to find a bolt-action rifle with mounted optics: earlier weapons only had iron sights, and while I’m growing accustomed to using iron sights for the multiplayer, it is such a nice bonus to have access to optics for longer-range engagements. The bottom line here is that exploring a level and hunting down weapon crates can give players access to more effective weapons beyond those wielded by enemy forces, and while I’ve been nominally exploring the campaign missions, I’ve not made a full effort to track down all of the field guides, or complete all the challenges in each mission. I might go back at some point in the future to complete all of these objectives, but for now, one last mission in the campaign awaits, and then it’s time to wrap up Deus Ex: Mankind Divided  to see where Adam Jensen’s story takes him.

Avanti Savoia: Reflections on the Battlefield 1 Campaign

“The machine gun is a much over rated weapon.” —Field Marshal Douglas Haig

In the years after the Great War, Luca Vincenzo Cocchiola recounts his experiences to his daughter. A member of the Italian Arditi unit, Luca is tasked with supporting the main unit, which his brother Matteo, is a part of. Luca equips heavy armour and a MG-08/15 machine gun, punching his way through enemy lines and allowing the forces to capture Austro-Hungary positions, taking an anti-air position and repelling an attack. When the Austro-Hungarians detonate explosives that trigger a landslide to hold back the Italians, and out of concern for Matteo’s safety, Luca sets off to find Matteo, assisting Italian forces along the way. Upon reaching a captured fortress and clearing out the hostile forces, Luca finds that Matteo has died. Back in the present, Luca bids his brother happy birthday. Translating to “Go, Savoia” in reference to Italy’s period monarch and used as a battle cry to rally soldiers, the fourth mission of the campaign takes place in the Italian Dolomite mountains, the site of fierce battles between Italian and Austro-Hungary forces. “Avanti Savoia” is the shortest mission campaign of Battlefield 1, spanning only two acts, but in spite of this short time frame, succinctly captures the notion that the First World War’s impact at the family and individual level scaled to affect entire nations.

While long cited as perhaps the most implausible mission of the campaign, “Avanti Savoia” comes across as being an introduction of sorts to the elite classes of Battlefield 1. The elite classes are subdivided into Sentries, Flame Troopers and Tank Hunters, each with their own unique strengths. Equipping the MG-08/15 as Luca means players will experience the Sentry class, which is characterised by its slow movement speed, high damage resistance offered by the heavy armour and a weapon most useful at close ranges. In the campaign, Luca’s equipment allows him to push through enemy lines and lay waste to enemy positions in frenzied close-quarters combat. The MG-08/15 is terrifyingly effective against enemy infantry, and while intended to be fired on full automatic, it can be lethal in bursts, as well. After surviving an assault on his position by enemy aircraft, “Avanti Savoia” takes on a more personal tone as Luca tries to find his brother to ascertain his safety. This desparate mission gives the sense that the combatants in the Great War were still people, each with their own families, backgrounds and stories. While Battlefield 1 does not give much insight into the countless number of enemy forces killed, watching Luca’s own story does lead one to wonder what stories the Austro-Hungarian (and enemy soldiers in general) have, well beyond being game objects programmed with AI to make the player’s experience interesting.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • The Arditi unit’s precursors in reality were indeed known for their armour and “Farina” helmets, playing a demolitions role that resulted in many casualties. I’m not too sure as to whether or not the Arditi themselves used such armour; while Battlefield 1 might be portraying the armour and weapons as being more effective than they were historically, the game is trying to go for authenticity over realism. This was quite a point of contention when the game came out, but with the launch past now, it seems that most folks have accepted the new environment and setting that Battlefield 1 offers.

  • The heavy armour provides serious protection against enemy fire, reducing incoming damage by a substantial amount, although it also precludes aiming down sights. Fortunately, the MG-08/15 is reasonably accurate at closer ranges even when fired from the hip and so, this section’s goal becomes a simple matter of clearing out the enemies. While the weapon is intended for fully automatic suppressive fire, I fired in bursts to down opponents to ensure the weapon did not jam mid-combat.

  • I’m ordinarily tempted to reload very frequently so I’m not caught with an empty magazine mid-firefight, but LMGs in general demand a different style of gameplay. Their large magazine capacity is offset by a longer reload time, so it is not particularly useful to reload when one still has around eighty percent of their rounds available. This leads to a new paradigm of gameplay, where I typically reload when I’m down to my last twenty percent of my ammunition.

  • Battlefield 3 and 4‘s multiplayer only allowed soldiers to carry an additional two hundred rounds in reserve for their LMGs, but the MG-08/15, both in the campaign and the multiplayer’s elite class, allows for a staggering eight hundred rounds to be carried in reserve. The original variant, the MG-08, was a general-purpose German machine gun derived off the Maxim gun for German infantry, and the 1915 variant was a lighter version, weighing around eighteen kilograms compared to the standard version’s sixty-nine kilograms.

  • The climb up the mountain is a slow one, as Luca must turn the MG-08/15 to bear against numerous soldiers. In conjunction with Luca’s armour, I almost feel bad for the soldiers going up against what would have seemed an unstoppable force against which they had little efficacy against. Time and time again, I hear the phrase “no effect on target” in shooters, and in games with more fictional elements in their settings, this is usually done to emphasise the power of their opponents.

  • Here, the fog effects in Battlefield 1 are visible: like its predecessors, Battlefield 1 uses the Frostbite 3 Engine and so, the game only represents a moderate jump in graphics. However, subtle details, especially pertaining to details in the environment, such as textures of environment assets and the player viewmodel of their weapons, have been improved substantially. One element I’m noticing is the accumulation of mud and water droplets on a weapon as one moves through the environment.

  • The reason why I’ve only gone through only two magazines’ worth of 7.92 x 57 mm rounds for the MG-08/15 is because I’ve been firing slowly. Though it might be tempting to hold down the trigger and let loose the weapon’s full rate of fire, I figured that I would try to hold onto this weapon for as long as possible.

  • The Dolomites are located in Northeastern Italy and take their name from the mineral, which is found in abundance. At present, the area is a popular tourist location, with skiing being the predominant winter sport. During the summer, rock climbing, hiking and cycling are some of the activities that visitors partake in.

  • As Luca makes his way further up the mountainside, flame troopers are present in larger numbers, and can rapidly deplete the player’s health. The mechanics in Battlefield 1 introduce a new means of lessening damage sustained by explosions and flames; by going prone, fire and explosion damage is reduced slightly, making the difference between life and death. In the campaign, shooting the flame trooper’s fuel tanks will cause them to detonate spectacularly, dealing incendiary damage to nearby enemies, as well.

  • Luca’s secondary weapon is an Automatico M1918. At present, my assault class in the multiplayer is rank one, so I should be able to purchase this weapon’s trench variant, which has a better hip firing accuracy than the factory version. The M1918 generally has a much higher firing rate than the MP-18 and is devastating in close quarters. After clearing the bunker, I somehow lost the MG-08/15 and picked up a Hellriegel in the process.

  • I’ve been playing through the Battlefield 1 multiplayer concurrently with the campaign, and so far, have largely focused on leveling the medic class. In all the Battlefield games I’ve gone through, the medic invariably becomes my most used class, typically because it allows me to heal and revive teammates on very short order. In all versions of Battlefield, and where Battlefield 1 is no exception, I hardly ever play the sniper classes, since I prefer to be in the midst of combat, armed with weapons that let me capture objectives and fend off close opponents at close range.

  • The darkening skies in the Dolomites are reminiscent of what occurs whenever a storm enters my region adjacent to the sun. The amount of water vapour in the air causes light to scatter, reducing the number of photons that make it through, creating a sense of darkness. However, once the storm is overhead, the differences in light and dark become far less pronounced.

  • Repelling the air assault can be a little challenging owing to the amount of smoke and obstruction in the skies once things really get underway. There is only one model of anti-air weapon in Battlefield 1, and while the armies using shared weapons does prima facie seem a little strange, Battlefield 1 is set before nations created dedicated weapons manufacturing firms, resulting in a plethora of weapons diversity presently seen.

  • For “Avanti Savoia”‘s second act, Luca is armed with a Villar Perosa M15, a double-barreled weapon capable of firing 1500 rounds per minute per barrel and originally designed for use on an aircraft. Although the weapon’s weaker 9 mm bullets deal limited damage, the M15 has an effective firing rate of 3000 rounds per minute, making it a beast of a weapon for hip-firing at close quarters environments.

  • While tempting to simply use this weapon, it is more practical to sneak about and silently dispatch the first of the enemies, then ascertain where everyone else is before going loud. While Battlefield 1‘s campaign tips suggest that melee kills are not totally silent, in practise, I’ve used nothing but melee kills to sneak through entire areas without being detected.

  • One of my readers has stated that Battlefield 1 is unoriginal and unimaginative for not presenting things from the Triple Alliance or Axis perspective if the game is in a World War setting, wondering why no game developer is willing to take the leap of faith and do so. There are several explanations: most developers of FPS titles are of an American origin, and there is a market demand for retelling stories of how the good guys kicked the bad guys’ asses in both World Wars. In Germany and Japan, games of different types are more popular, hence the relatively limited number of games told from an alternative perspective, and most developers probably are unwilling to present a campaign where the protagonists are doomed to fail on virtue of historical outcomes for fear of disappointing their audiences.

  • Thanks to its short effective range, I immediately traded off my sidearm for something with a bit more stopping power at a distance, and in this mission, the Gewehr M. 95 is available to fulfil that role. Despite possessing only iron sights, the ranges at which enemies are encountered in the campaign are not too high, so iron sights will be more than sufficient to get the job done.

  • There are several ways to approach the fortress, whether its sneaking in through the basement or taking a more direct route. In comparison to its predecessors, Battlefield 1‘s campaign takes place in more open environments, and offer multiple paths, making it much less linear. So far, I’ve not encountered any quick-time events, either, and overall, while I do miss the real-time weapon customisation offered by Battlefield: Hardline‘s campaign, in general, Battlefield 1 has taken lessons from earlier games and improved on its campaign.

  • My Gewehr M. 95 eventually ran dry, but I was able to source an Selbstlader M1916 Optical: the Selbstlader’s marksman variant is a medic weapon I grew rather fond of during the beta, and a few of my past gaming sessions was indeed to reach rank two for the medic class in order to unlock the Selbstlader marksman, which will be an asset on conquest matches where there is plenty of open spaces. However, as I am very fond of close-quarters combat, I also picked up the Autoloading 8 .25 extended to facilitate my preferred play-style.

  • With the fourth of the campaign mission now over, I’ve only got two missions left to experience and write about for Battlefield 1. The campaign does come across as a bit short, but it’s been quite entertaining, acting as an extended tutorial of sorts for the game’s main attraction, the multiplayer. Naturally, this means that posts for the remaining missions will come out soon, and in the gaming department, I’m very nearly finished the Prague night missions for Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

In presenting these war stories in its campaign as opposed to a single narrative, Battlefield 1 is able to explore a variety of different perspectives from fictionalised accounts of the First World War. Because this war is often forgotten in the aftermath of the much deadlier and widespread Second World War, even if the stories in Battlefield 1 are fictional, they nonetheless do much to pique the players’ curiosity with respect to the untold conflicts and campaigns of the Great War beyond the familiar muddy trenches often depicted by media. Thus, through the War Stories, the more unknown sides are brought to light to demonstrate that World War One is more complex and involved much more than the Western Front alone, hence its moniker as the First World War. Battlefield 1‘s unique combination of these short stories in conjunction with unparalleled sound and visual design means that there is much to experience, bringing both the heroics and horrors of the First World War to life in a way that World War One games have found difficult to capture.