The Infinite Zenith

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Tag Archives: Taichi Tanaka

Growing Sunny, Crying and Sometimes Singing: Revisiting the Conclusion of Tari Tari a Decade Later and The Legacy A Celebration of Multidisciplinary Approaches Imparted on P.A. Works

“That’s the key to new and good ideas; they come from having a very broad and multidisciplinary range of interests.” –Robin Chase

While Tari Tari had opened with uncertain aims, by its finale, this series had delivered a moving story of how a disparate group would come together and, using their unique backgrounds and experiences, help one another out of their problems before rallying their entire school together to perform one final swan song, in the form of a play with live music from the choir, before it closes down ahead of a plan to redevelop the area. Although Tari Tari had seemingly been about everything and nothing, this aspect of it proved to be the anime’s greatest asset – each of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro came in with different skills and perspectives, but despite seemingly lacking a shared set of interests, they come to realise the worth of their time spent together and cherish the memories they make, using these experiences to forge onwards into an uncertain future. In this way, Tari Tari was a celebration of being multidisciplinary; the final performance comes about precisely because everyone was able to bring something distinct to the table. Wakana’s background in music and a desire to bring her mother’s old song to life allows her to write the play’s music. Konatsu’s optimism and enthusiasm keeps her friends moving forward even when everyone seems mired in their own problems. Atsuhiro similarly desires to do something grand for a friend back home and ends up contributing the props with Taichi, while Sawa uses her connections to bring as many people as possible to make the show one to remember. None of this would’ve been possible had the characters not opened up to one another – when Tari Tari concluded, the series’ emphasis on music had spoken to the idea that music transcends background, belief, intents and desires to unify people. The series showed how people who are outwardly different can share more in common than they had imagined, and that by opening people up to this fact, music can set people down a rewarding path they’d never experienced. Seeing Wakana come to terms with her mother’s death, and Sawa fighting her hardest to again admittance to an equestrian school reminds viewers that everyone has their own struggles, but when they open up and help one another out, seemingly insurmountable problems are overcome. However, Tari Tari also marked the first time P.A. Works explored the multidisciplinary mindset. Rather than have each of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro be members of the choral club, Tari Tari gave everyone a unique background and has them come together in the unusually-named Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club. Such a setup would, on paper, seem conducive towards lack of a cohesive direction, but the club ends up exceeding expectations in its achievements precisely because, given that Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro all contribute different things to the swan song that leaves their entire graduating class with life-long memories.

In its execution, Tari Tari would ultimately set the precedence for P.A. Works’ future anime to a nontrivial extent. Despite possessing a less focused story than its predecessor, Hanasaku Iroha, and having a shorter runtime, Tari Tari had demonstrated that even with the short format and a narrative that progressed much more quickly, it remained possible to tell a highly compelling story with engaging, relatable characters. This approach would return in Sakura Quest, which similarly had a group of individuals with distinct skillsets and backgrounds unite in a quest to bolster tourism in a remote rural town, and again in The World in Colours, where magic and photography combine together to allow Hitomi and her grandmother, Kohaku, to connect more closely and help Hitomi to regain the colours in her world. Similarly, in The Aquatope on White Sand, Kukuru and Fūka both end their stories quite far from their first steps. Fūka began her journey as a failed idol who sought refuge by working in an aquarium, but her experience in entertainment allows her to bring a very unique skillset to become a talented attendant. Kukuru had spent her entire life enraptured by marine life and longed to be an attendant, but at Tingarla, she discovers that her attempts to keep Gama Gama open means, when she puts her mind to it, she is able to excel in marketing, as well. Tari Tari established that stories celebrating the multidisciplinary approach can be exceptionally moving regardless of the context – in time, viewers will come to root for the characters because seeing their stories and grit proves inspiring, regardless of whether the characters’ goals are to embrace magic, bring tourism and life back to a small town or promote a newly-opened aquarium. In promoting the multidisciplinary approach to life, P.A. Works is seeking to remind viewers of its increasing relevance in all facets of life – combining seemingly unrelated fields confers numerous advantages in both academia and industry because it provides a more holistic view of a problem, and this in turn allows one to draw upon knowledge from different areas to identify and implement effective, innovative solutions. Through their stories, P.A. Works celebrates methods that encourage people to adopt a broader mindset towards the challenges in their lives, and from a storytelling perspective, it creates for plots in which one is always kept on the edge of the seat by what’s about to happen next.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • By Tari Tari‘s end, everyone’s undergone a considerable amount of growth. Konatsu is more mindful of those around her, while Wakana has rediscovered music, and Sawa similarly realises that she can count on people in her corner to help out. It was a rewarding journey to follow, and thirteen episodes later, Tari Tari shows that even with the shorter format, P.A. Works could still deliver a fantastic story by ensuring that no moment is wasted. In this way, Tari Tari is all steak on top of its sizzle. Towards the series’ end, the land the students’ school stands on us purchased by a land developer, forcing term to close early.

  • Although the developers had tried to buy the principal out, in the end, the principal decides his students’ memories are worth more than whatever bonus they’re prepared to offer him. Forgoing the bonus, he authorises the final performance to proceed even as a heavy rainfall hammers Enoshima. One detail in Tari Tari I’ve always found especially impressive was the use of reflections to convey the idea of wetness on the ground whenever it rains, and here the characters’ reflections can plainly be seen. Tari Tari aired during a time when NVIDIA’s Kepler series first hit the market: this was well before real-time ray-tracing became mainstream, and a part of me does wonder if real-time ray-tracing could be applied towards anime.

  • Instructor Naoko had been a minor antagonist of sorts early in Tari Tari: she was strongly opposed to Konatsu starting her own choral club and seemed quite intent on ensuring that Konatsu would not sing, but as Tari Tari wore on, it became clear that Naoko saw a bit of Wakana’s mother, Mahiru, in Konatsu: when she was still alive, Mahiru had been a free spirit who was both knowledgeable about musical theory and saw music as an avenue for having fun. Over time, seeing Wakana come around helps Naoko to accept her best friend’s passing.

  • Thus, on the day of the performance, Naoko has no qualms in backing the principal’s decision to allow the performance to continue, and she even helps organise the choral club and band’s participation. The rainy weather on this morning had acted as something of a dampener, accentuating the feeling of unease, but once everyone gathers, even rain cannot douse their spirits. The Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club thus initiate preparations ahead of their presentation while other students and parents begin assembling to watch the show.

  • Although Konatsu had initially appeared to be a Ohana Matsumae knockoff, over the course of Tari Tari, she would come to gain development of her own. Like Ohana, Konatsu is optimistic to a fault and is very forceful about what she wants, but this initially gets her in trouble with those around her. Konatsu gradually learns to dial it back and think before jumping into a situation, but is also given a chance to be her usual self upon learning the school is closing; her blunt and direct approach is needed in a time where speed is essential in ensuring everything is ready, inspiring even her former choral club classmates to contribute.

  • As the morning transitions into the afternoon, the rain begins letting up, and some of the students start showing up to check out the performance. Enoshima Sea Candle can be seen in the background: the events of Tari Tari are set in Fujisawa, and the area’s picturesque landscape has made it a popular choice for being the setting in a given anime. However, of all the incarnations I’ve seen so far, Tari Tari‘s portrayal of Fujisawa and Enoshima remains the best: even though this is one of P.A. Works’ earlier titles, Tari Tari‘s visuals are gorgeous.

  • The musical finally begins: this had originally been Konatsu’s idea as their school geared up for their annual culture festival, but when the developers purchased the land and accelerated their plans to begin construction, all school events were cancelled. Refusing to give up, Konatsu and her friends ended up pushing ahead even without permission; help from Wakana is ultimately what gives everyone the resolve to continue. Wakana had begun her journey in Tari Tari with the intent of quitting music and leaving her regrets behind: shortly before her mother had passed away, Wakana had been short with her, and since then, she’d felt guilty about not spending more time with her. Abandoning music was her original way of leaving the pain behind, but through Konatsu and Sawa, Wakana realises the way forward is to embrace what her mother had loved.

  • The energy and determination in the Choir-and-Sometimes-Badmonton Club exude eventually convinces their classmates to help out; because their school was slated to close so suddenly, the students realise that this represents a final chance of sorts to participate in a swan song to their high school memories. In this way, the club is able persuade both their fellow students and neighbourhood to show up. The sort of outcome in Tari Tari brought to mind memories of my first-ever journal publication: it had been abandoned when term picked up, but after the MCAT, I found myself with more time than I’d known what to do with.

  • Working on the paper with my colleagues was my way of filling that time and doing something with the remainder of my summer. In the end, we were able to complete the paper ahead of the deadline, and when I asked my colleagues if they wanted to be first author, both agreed that since I ended up spearheading the project and bringing it back to life, I had earned that particular honour. Like the musical Konatsu had wanted to perform, publishing this paper was a bit of a last minute thing, and while it did mean I spent three weeks not working on starting my thesis project, the paper actually would accelerate my thesis work by giving me the inspiration I needed to design the project.

  • Hikari no Senritsu is a recurring theme in Tari Tari: the song was originally written by Mahiru, and Wakana later adapts it into a version that the Choir-and-Sometimes-Badminton Club perform for their finale. As the group breaks into song, the clouds begin dispersing, with shafts of light illuminating the performers right as they hit their stride. While short, Tari Tari‘s journey and its parallels with my undergraduate paper led me to count this as a masterpiece, showing what’s possible when hearts and minds align.

  • During the finale, scenes cut to the audience enjoying the show immensely: Sawa’s father is especially enthusiastic, having brought both a video camera and DSLR camera to capture his daughter’s accomplishments. For Sawa, Tari Tari saw her as a friendly girl who generally gets along with people, but struggled with her rejected equestrian school application because she’d been too tall to qualify. Although Sawa’s father had considered her aspirations as being a game rather than a legitimate occupation, he would come around and see how serious Sawa had been. Despite his gruff nature, Sawa’s father genuinely cares for her.

  • Taichi and Atsuhiro ended up receiving some development: although failing to perform well at a tournament, Taichi resolves to give it everything he’s got, while Atsuhiro’s preoccupation with a friend back in Austria leads him to double down and do what he can here in Japan for his friend’s sake. Everyone’s stories converge on this one moment, and seeing everyone singing so gracefully together, one would be forgiven if they imagined Konatsu, Sawa, Wakana, Taichi and Atsuhiro to be members of their school’s choral club.

  • Tari Tari‘s final performance was so moving that amongst the anime community, the series was universally acclaimed. Random Curiosity wrote that it was almost criminal as to how the expectations for this series was so low early on, especially when Tari Tari went out of its way to make itself stand out from its predecessor, and other fans felt that the series had been so decisive and satisfying that it exceeded expectations. Despite being a little-known series, Tari Tari‘s sincerity and focus impressed most viewers. In fact, to the best of my recollections, only THEM Anime Reviews had anything negative to say about Tari Tari, calling it a series ” full of platitudes and melodrama but lacking in most other respects”, and that “music anime out there in which the actual music is much, much better, and dramas in which the trials and tribulations the characters face are far less contrived-seeming”. I strongly disagree with this assessment because it is superficial and fails to understand why drama is present in Tari Tari.

  • THEM Anime Reviews’ writer missed the point of the series (namely, that music transcends certain barriers, that one needs to allow themselves to open up in order to get past problems they can’t individually handle, and that sometimes, situations arise that require people possessing skills from a range of backgrounds). The series isn’t “a lot of artificial drama being thrown in to make the journey to that performance seem significant”, and instead, Tari Tari sought to show how being multidisciplinary is the key to overcoming life’s problems. In this area, Tari Tari is successful, and I’ve found that, especially where P.A. Works’ anime are concerned, the most critical views often come from those who have not experienced the sorts of messages a given anime sought to convey.

  • As the performance draws to a close, the camera pulls out, showing the number of people that have shown up to see the show, as well as the size of the choral club. By this point in time, the clouds have begun giving way to a clear day, acting as a metaphor for how times of difficulty will always pass. It is evident that this final show was a resounding success, and with this particular goal satisfied, Wakana, Sawa, Konatsu, Taichi and Atsuhiro turn their attention towards their future aspirations. I still vividly recall entering my thesis year as Tari Tari geared up for its finale.

  • A week after term started, I got my MCAT results back, and with a great weight lifted off my chest, I focused my entire effort towards the thesis project. After sitting down with my supervisor and asking about whether or not it would be feasible to extend my old renal model from two summers earlier, we hashed out a project that could show off the lab’s in-house game engine. I’d worked with this game engine for two years at that point and was quite familiar with its strengths and limitations, so when it came time to present my project proposal, I was completely confident that I could answer any question about the system, its implications and constraints.

  • The thesis project took up two of the five slots in each semester, so I had three remaining courses to fill. I decided to take easier options so I could focus on the project: in science fiction literature and genomics, I excelled. These courses were largely based on reading and writing papers, something I’d been reasonably confident in doing at that point. The other course I had begun taking was iOS programming. I would end up working on a game, and while that project was unimpressive, it did kick-start my interest in mobile development. Until graduate school, this was the easiest term I’d taken, allowing me plenty of time to work on my thesis project.

  • Looking back, my undergraduate thesis was also quite unremarkable: I’d already had an impressive model of agent-based flow by then, so the project itself entailed writing a mathematical modelling layer over top and then synchronising a visual representation of several nephrons working together in parallel to the model’s outputs, before making use of the game engine’s world space to illustrate the different scales. I would’ve liked to have explored more complex processes, such as self-assembly. However, my supervisor and invigilators were satisfied with the level of complexity in my project.

  • In the end, I had a great time with my project, and while things do seem unsophisticated a decade later, I nonetheless found a fantastic experience in going through the thesis project. A decade after starting this project, I’m now a half-year into living at the new place, and I feel quite settled in now. Looking back at some of the posts I wrote shortly after the move, I did end up capitalising on the amenities: over the summer, I’ve had a chance to enjoy sushi twice from the nearby Japanese restaurant, spent an afternoon working out of a Starbucks with a fruit juice in hand, and even was able to pick up an RTX 3060 Ti during a flash sale after work.

  • Summer had been a fantastic time this year, and while I’m a little sad to see my favourite times of year draw to a close, the Autumnal Equinox was two days ago, bringing with it comfortably brisk days that are still pleasant. The leaves have taken a little longer to yellow this year than they have in previous years, but I welcome the fact that we’re no longer getting heat warnings. In fact, for the first time in a while, I’m rather looking forwards to the winter, as well. In previous years, winters meant negotiating icy roads and shovelling out after a snowfall while wind-chill drops the thermometer down to -40°C for up to two weeks at a time, but it also blankets the landscape in white and invites the sipping of a hot chocolate while curled up in one’s favourite easy chair with a book and blanket in hand.

  • Tari Tari‘s epilogue was satisfying, but also left quite a bit ambiguous: in particular, the outcome of Taichi’s kokuhaku to Sawa is left unknown. This question has lingered on my mind for the past decade, and while Tari Tari ~Mebaitari Terashitari Yappari Tokidoki Utattari~ (Tari Tari ~Budding, Shining, and Sometimes Singing~), a sequel novel set a decade after the original’s events, was released back in July 2018, interest in this has been sufficiently low so that even a synopsis for the novel’s premise doesn’t exist. I can say that in ten years, a lot can change: ten years after I graduate high school, I fulfilled a lifelong dream of visiting Japan, finished my graduate degree and was working with my first start-up.

  • This year marks the ten year anniversary to Tari Tari: I’d been a student a decade earlier, gearing up for my undergraduate thesis defense. A full ten years later, I’ve become a senior iOS developer and homeowner. In spite of everything that has happened, the fact that I still remember Tari Tari as fondly now as I did when the series finished airing back in 2012 speaks volumes to how much this anime got right. The amount of stuff that can happen in a decade is staggering, and this is one of the biggest reasons why being unable to read Tari Tari ~Mebaitari Terashitari Yappari Tokidoki Utattari~ is so excruciatingly painful: I’ve been longing to see how Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro are doing.

  • However, because most people in reality tend to be honest, hard-working and sincere, most people tend to find a path for themselves over time. Applying this to Tari Tari would suggest that everyone must be well, having had ten years to broaden their horizons, grow their skillsets and improve their ability to empathise with one another. Because of how much can happen in ten years, a part of me also feels that Taichi’s feelings for Sawa could wane over time as he pursues his own passions. As romantic and touching as it would be for the pair to retain their feelings after all this time, people do drift apart over time, especially since Sawa had been heading overseas to follow her dreams of becoming a jockey.

  • Regardless of what actually happens in the sequel novel, I would be more than happy to read it. At the time of writing, I don’t believe the novel’s even available for purchase at my usual avenues: if it were, I’d have no qualms in picking it up because in this day and age, ML and computer vision is sufficiently advanced so that I could simply take my phone, image the text and get a real-time translation. With iOS 16, I can then extract the text from my image and then convert it into strings that I can open in a text editor, where I could edit and improve passages. In this way, I feel that I could translate the novel for myself without much difficulty.

  • I’ve always wanted to feature the moment where Sawa begins singing alongside her friends and opens the window in her dormitory: I’ve written about Tari Tari quite extensively over the years, but never was able to feature this moment previously. There’s a sort of joy about Sawa doing this that captures the sort of excitement that accompanies the uncertainty of stepping into the future. I believe it is this scene of Sawa opening the window with a smile on her face that I would later comment on in RPG Real Estate, when Kotone does the same while checking out a prospective property.

  • I imagine that seeing Wakana take up music again encourages Naoko to spend more time mentoring her. Naoko had always found Mahiru’s approach to music admirable, but one she could never take up, and when she died, it was probably the case that Naoko handled her grief by distancing herself from music as a source of joy. However, when Wakana comes to terms with her mother’s death and approaches to music, to Naoko, Wakana has inherited her mother’s joyful spirit, as well. Mahiru might no longer be around, but mentoring Wakana allows Naoko to keep supporting her best friend.

  • Meanwhile, Tari Tari‘s epilogue shows Konatsu as meeting two other girls that seem quite friendly: although Konatsu has known Taichi and Sawa for a long time, such a moment shows that Konatsu can find her own path forward, as well. Small details like these can speak volumes about how characters are doing, and I’ve noticed that since Tari Tari, P.A. Works is a studio that has excelled in finding a way of saying goodbye to its series. Although making up only a short amount of the finale’s runtime, these short scenes provide a satisfactory amount of insight into how everyone’s doing.

  • On account of yesterday marking the half-year anniversary since moving day, we treated the family to the famous fried chicken from the Japanese restaurant across the way; they’ve been running a promotion on their in-house ginger-garlic karaage, which is going for a dollar a piece. In this way, we were able to have a wonderful dinner commemorating six months at the new place for fifteen dollars, a fantastic deal: the chicken is expertly fried, being crunchy outside but retaining succulent and tender meat. The Japanese restaurant is suggesting they’ll be introducing new flavours in the future, which is exciting: I’m curious to see what other flavours the chefs have coming.

  • With this, my reminiscence of Tari Tari comes to a close. I’ve written about the series with some frequency over the past decade, speaking to the strengths of this series: despite the time that has passed, the fact that Tari Tari‘s lessons now remain as applicable as they did back in 2012 is a key indicator to how well everything here was thought out. After Tari Tari ended, P.A. Works would swing between creating smash-hits like Shirobako and Nagi no Asukara, alongside failures like RDG Red Data Girl and Glasslip. Over the years, however, learnings from Tari Tari have meant that P.A. Works’ coming-of-age and workplace anime tend to be quite consistent: Sakura QuestThe World in Colours and The Aquatope on White Sand all carry over the multidisciplinary approach that Tari Tari pioneered.

When Tari Tari concluded, I was three weeks into my thesis year. Impressed with how well Tari Tari had presented its messages, I entered my thesis project with enthusiasm – this year marked the first time since secondary school that I was confident in my ability to perform. In the Health Sciences programme, students complete a thesis project to round out their degree, and three weeks into term, our goal had been to present a project proposal in front of the course coordinator and classmates. Unlike my classmates, who had a four month head start on their projects, I entered September with only a rough idea of what my thesis would entail. However, in the time between the start of term and the proposal presentation date, I had managed to draw on my previous experiences in my lab to design a novel project of my own – having just published my first paper about our lab’s in-house game engine and its flexibility, I decided to extend the work I’d began two years earlier on agent-based renal flow and build it into a multi-scale system that combined mathematical modelling with agent-based approaches. Much as how Tari Tari and its successors encouraged combining approaches from a variety of disciplines to build a magnum opus, I drew on my knowledge of biology and software to suggest how component-based modelling would confer enough flexibility to build anything, with a renal system being an example of a complex system worth visualising. On the day of the presentation, I remember delivering my proposal and smoothly answered questions: in that moment, it felt as though I were selling a start-up’s groundbreaking new idea to VCs rather than outlining a health sciences project to professors. Speaking in front of experts is an intimidating experience, but for me, it dawned on me that where software and simulations were concerned, the cards were in my hand. It was here that I began seeing Tari Tari in a new light – Tari Tari isn’t merely a series about music’s ability to convey messages that transcend linguistic and cultural borders, and the importance of opening oneself up to others around them, but also how important it is to be able to bring in knowledge from other areas in order to improve one’s own problem-solving ability and resilience. P.A. Works has certainly taken this message to heart: following Tari Tari, anime like Sakura Quest, The World in Colours and The Aquatope on White Sand all integrate multidisciplinary approaches elegantly into their stories to create a compelling anime, and the fact that even a decade later, workplace and coming-of-age stories from P.A. Works that employ this style have continued to impress.

Running and Inviting: Revisiting the Beginning of Tari Tari a Decade Later and the Choir and Sometimes Badminton Club’s Influence On a Journal Publication

“Challenges are what make life interesting. Overcoming them is what makes life meaningful.” –Joshua Marine

When Tari Tari was announced, beyond a key visual of three characters who greatly resembled their counterparts from Hanasaku Iroha, there had been very little information surrounding what this series would deal with. After the first episode concluded, it became clear enough that Tari Tari would be musically themed; viewers are introduced to Konatsu Matsumoto, a disgraced member of the choir club who wants to sing for her own enjoyment and Wakana Sakai, who is transferring out of the music program in a bid to move on after her mother’s passing. Tari Tari would ultimately detail how these two conflicting paths would reconcile, and how seeing Konatsu’s earnest efforts towards pursuing an interest would remind Wakana of how her own mother had approached music, as well. This would lead Wakana to come to terms with her past and in doing so, help Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro create something meaningful as their school sends off their final cohort of graduates ahead of a redevelopment project. Uplifting and inspiring, Tari Tari indicates that when people stumble, it is support from others that help them to find their way again. Unlike other series, Tari Tari has a very intense pacing: Wakana comes to terms with her mother’s death mid-series, and uses her newfound enjoyment of music to both help Konatsu leave a legacy behind as their school closes, as well as Sawa to find her way again when she begins to lose hope after being rejected from an equestrian program. Much as how Sawa and Konatsu had tried to help Wakana, Wakana is able to grow and return the favour to her friends in a big way. The first episode of Tari Tari, however, betrays none of this to viewers: at the end of the first episode, viewers were only introduced to the characters, creating a sense of intrigue as to how the series would unfold. First impressions in anime are important, and Tari Tari certainly captured my interest during a time when, having finished my physics course, I became wholly focused on preparing for the MCAT. Each and every week, I had a new episode of Tari Tari to look forwards to, and seeing how the series showed a group of individuals putting in the effort to make something bigger than themselves would have another, unforeseen impact on what I ended up doing after the MCAT concluded.

A half-year before Tari Tari began airing, one of my colleagues had suggested the idea of submitting a paper to an undergraduate journal about the versatility of our lab’s in-house game engine in visualising and interacting with biological processes. After classes ended, we would spend time drafting notes on what the paper would deal with in the student lounge on the medical campus. Halfway into the winter term, however, the coursework began picking up – I was struggling with biochemistry and needed to keep up with cell and molecular biology, while my friends similarly became busy with their own studies. The paper became forgotten as a result. When my MCAT finished, I had three weeks left in the summer left to me. By this point in time, Sawa had recovered her own determination after overhearing her father vouching for her while on the phone with an admissions officer from the equestrian institute she’d applied to. Together with encouragement from Wakana, Konatsu, Taichi and Atsuhiro, Sawa returns to school to help her friends convince the music instructor they should be allowed to perform at the culture festival. In the last hour, everyone had pulled through and set the groundwork for realising their wish of doing something together. Although three weeks was not a lot of time, my summer schedule had been quite open. I therefore approached two of my other colleagues who’d been interested in the paper, and they readily agreed to continue with the paper, being more than happy to refine their notes into passages. In the space of two weeks, I worked on the paper and transformed a set of notes into a full-fledged publication. My peers were pleased, but to my surprise, my supervisor was also impressed. A few revisions later, we had a complete first draft ready for submission. Both my colleagues had suggested that I take the first author position, having spearheaded the paper; while I am not one for ceremony, it suddenly dawned on me that a desire to do more with my summer beyond just the MCAT had left me with an experience not unlike that of Tari Tari. Having now written our first-ever publications in a journal, I became curious to see how Tari Tari would conclude, and the ending, which aired as my undergraduate thesis project was under way, was every bit as heartwarming and satisfying to watch.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Tari Tari caught my eye because I had greatly enjoyed Hanasaku Iroha: at the time, I would’ve still been a novice to anime, and had picked my series based on their similarities to shows I’d previously watched. At first glance, the character designs in Tari Tari were very familiar and had clear counterparts in Hanasaku Iroha: Wakana is Minko, Konatsu is Ohana and Sawa is Nako. However, while there are some overlaps in terms of personality, I would quickly find that Sawa is more confident and foward, while Wakana lacks Minko’s bite. Konatsu, while energetic, lacks the same stubbornness seen in Ohana.

  • The music in Tari Tari is top-tier: Shirō Hamaguchi is the composer for the anime’s soundtrack, and the series’ leitmotif, Kokoro no Senritsu, was such an iconic song that I felt compelled to watch this series on the virtue of listening to the music alone. As it turns out, Hamaguchi has a very extensive resume to his name, having previously composed the music to Ah! My Goddess, and later, would score the soundtracks for Shirobako and Girls und Panzer. Hints of Ah! My Goddess and Girls und Panzer can indeed be heard in Shirobako‘s music. However, Hamaguchi is a versatile composer, unlike Kenji Kawai or Hiroyuki Sawanoo, whose style makes them immediately recognisable.

  • In its opening moments, Tari Tari gives all of the main characters some shine time so their personalities can be established; unlike Hanasaku Iroha, which had two cours of time to work with, Tari Tari only has thirteen episodes. This meant that there is a lot less time to develop nuances, and I found that compared to the previous anime I watched, such as Ah! My GoddessAzumanga DaiohGundam 00 and Real Drive, things were a lot more condensed. The early 2010s were a time when anime studios were transitioning away from two cour series so they could work on a wider range of projects, and today, one cour series are more common than they had previously been.

  • On his first day of classes, Atsuhiro transferred into the same class as Sawa, Konatsu, Wakana and Taichi. Atsuhiro’s commonly known as “Wein” because he’s from Vienna, and while he’s unfamiliar with Japanese customs, speaks Japanese well enough. Tari Tari chooses to have him framed in a way as to face the school by morning to reinforce the idea that he’s new around these parts, and while originally, I had the least to say about Atsuhiro, it turns out he fulfills an important role: he acts as a surrogate for the viewer, who’s effectively dropped into things. Atsuhiro, like viewers, are unfamiliar with everything that’s going on around in Tari Tari, but over time, would come to get to know Wakana and her group better.

  • Even today, the visual details in Tari Tari are impressive: True Tears had been unremarkable, but from Angel Beats! onward, P.A. Work directed a great deal of effort into their lighting effects. Scenes end up becoming much more vibrant, and reflections are used to great effect. Here, one can see subtle reflections in the gymnasium’s wooden floor, and throughout the remainder of Tari Tari, reflections are utilised to make environments pop more. In giving spaces a shiny and reflective character, P.A. Works’ locations convey a sense of cleanliness.

  • While Wakana might not be friends with Sawa and Konatsu per se at the beginning of Tari Tari, everyone does appear to know one another well enough to share a conversation. Wakana is voiced by Ayahi Takagaki, whom I know best as Gundam 00‘s Feldt Grace, True Tears‘ Noe Isurugi and Honoka Ishikawa of Non Non Biyori. Now that I think about it, Wakana has the same voice as Honoka, so I’m actually a little surprised I didn’t notice this earlier. There’s a slightly childish trait about Takagaki’s voice in portraying Wakana and Honoka that makes both characters quite endearing. I’m not too familiar with Asami Seto’s roles, but I know Saori Hayami (Sawa) best as GochiUsa‘s Aoyama Blue Mountain, Yuzuki Shiraishi of A Place Further Than The Universe and Oregairu‘s Yukino Yukinoshita. Hayami is playing Ruby Rose in RWBY: Ice Queendom, as well.

  • Instructor Tomoko Takahashi is set to go on maternity leave at Tari Tari‘s beginning: this decision was made to emphasise to viewers that they are dropped into the story at a time of great change. Tari Tari would ultimately convey many themes, but at the heart of this anime is the idea that people always have the chance to count on one another and overcome obstacles that are too great for one to handle individually. This theme is a very popular one because it mirrors human society: our greatest achievements come as a consequence of teamwork and collaboration.

  • At Tari Tari‘s beginning, Konatsu struggles with music. She loves singing greatly, but ever since an incident which saw her fail spectacularly, she was demoted from an active role. She tries to convince the Vice Principal to reconsider reinstating her, but she is unsuccessful: the Vice Principal, Naoko Takakura, believes that one must approach music with finesse and precision. This behaviour foreshadows her own past friendship with Wakana’s mother, who had been very free-spirited and felt the best music came when people were free to be themselves. To dull the pain of Wakana’s mother’s passing, Naoko takes a very serious and no-nonsense approach to music.

  • Since the Hanasaku Iroha days, P.A. Works has been very fond of adding what I call “funny faces” to their anime. Said funny faces are usually a particularly strong reaction to something, and while some folks felt they break immersion, I’ve always found that funny faces really show how characters are feeling in ways that words and actions alone cannot. Funny faces reached their height in Shirobako, where Aoi Miyamori would sport a myriad of expressions in response to frustrations she encounters while on the job. Subsequent works, like The World In Colours, dispensed with this completely, but more recently, The Aquatope on White Sand brought funny faces back.

  • P.A. Works has gone through a lot over the past decade, and while they don’t always produce works I’m interested in watching, I’ve found that their coming-of-age and workplace are their strongest series, telling a very convincing and authentic tale of growth and self-discovery. This is a matter of personal preference: I happen to enjoy anime set in the real world, dealing with people and their problems. With this in mind, not every individual will share this perspective, and this is perfectly fine. However, over the past ten years, I’ve noticed people hating on P.A. Works to an unnecessary extent: AnimeSuki even has their own dedicated thread for criticising and tearing down the studio for everything they’ve produced after Hanasaku Iroha.

  • Things eventually reached a point where people regard True Tears and Shirobako as the only works of note P.A. Works has produced, with every else being an abject failure. After taking a closer look, it turns out some of AnimeSuki’s members, especially one Pocari Sweat, popularised the intense vitriol that arises whenever the name Mari Okada comes up. It is one thing to watch an anime all the way through and then do a reasoned breakdown of why it failed for an individual, but it is quite another to broadly dismiss a work simply because Mari Okada’s name appears as the series’ director.

  • Although I get that people have certain directors they dislike (Pocari Sweat’s hatred of Mari Okada is equivalent to people who do not watch Michael Bay films because of their hectic cutting and emphasis on special effects over substance), to have maintained this level of hatred for over a decade is unhealthy. I personally assess series based purely on its own merits and generally couldn’t care less about who’s directing it. While directors do have a signature style (e.g. Christopher Nolan’s films are very contemplative) that impact how a story unfolds, the worth of a work is based on how themes come together with other things like acting, visuals and flow.

  • Tari Tari was directed by Masakazu Hashimoto, who had previously worked on storyboards for Hanasaku Iroha and Angel Beats!, and as such, has a more subtle feel about it (whereas Mari Okada would’ve been a little more blunt about things). In a series about finding one’s path, this approach ends up being a ways more appropriate – there is some drama in Tari Tari, on account of the series being a coming-of-age story towards the end of secondary school, but things are resolved in a satisfying and conclusive manner.

  • As memory serves, I actually didn’t watch Tari Tari on its original airing date: a decade earlier, I’d been enjoying a day out in the mountains on a well-deserved break from studying for the MCAT, and ended up writing about the first episode on the second of July. Fast forward ten years, and the mountains have now become a very crowded destination owing to the fact that National Parks having free admissions on Canada Day is now common knowledge. This year, I ended up taking the family out over to the Badlands to check out the Atlas Coal Mine, after making a promise to my parents that we’d do a mine tour some five years earlier.

  • Tari Tari is a series I consider to be underappreciated in the anime community; despite its short length, this was a series that captured, with full sincerity, what it feels like to take the initiative and make the most of something. Although perhaps seen as annoying those around her, Konatsu’s spirit means that she’s ultimately able to bring Wakana out of her shell, and in doing so, Konatsu indirectly helps Sawa out, as well. Tari Tari betrays none of this in its first episode, but the combination of likeable characters and visually appealing visuals meant that I had no trouble becoming invested in Tari Tari as my summer wore on.

  • From here on out, my focus was singularly directed towards the MCAT. Tari Tari and Kokoro Connect gave me something to look forward to weekly, while my day-to-day schedule was spent studying extensively in mornings and afternoons. On days where I had my MCAT preparation course, I would usually linger on campus until around two in the afternoon before returning home. After five, I would put the brakes on studying and kicked back by spending most of my time in Team Fortress 2. My friend also introduced me to MicroVolts, which proved to be a fun third person arena shooter until the servers shut down

  • Without a physics course to also focus on, my days developed a pattern, and over the course of the summer, my practises MCAT scores climbed. From a score of 14 on my first-ever full length, I would rise to a 27 by the time Tari Tari reached its third episode, and by the time Wakana’s love of music returns to her at Tari Tari‘s halfway point, I scored a 33 on my last full-length practise exam. Emboldened, I finally felt ready to square off against the MCAT, and in the aftermath of the exam, I saw myself with nearly three full weeks of break left. Seeing the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club work tirelessly to put something together for their school festival inspired me to pick up the journal publication, which my colleagues had started but left unfinished.

  • Much as how Konatsu was able to start things with her spirit and have the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club send their school off in a bang, my efforts were met with a successful publication. I entered my undergraduate thesis year filled to the brim with confidence, and while the MCAT score would remain little more than a curious topic for dinner conversation, the learnings that I picked up from the summer of a decade earlier have remained relevant right up to the present. Similarly, Tari Tari has aged very gracefully: despite being ten years old, the anime’s themes are still applicable, and the artwork itself looks gorgeous. It’s certainly worth a watch, representing a very optimistic tale of how great things can manifest when one opens their heart to those around them.

Although I was effectively four months behind on my undergraduate thesis work (I effectively spent the entire summer at my desk studying for various exams while my peers were laying down the foundations to their thesis project), working on the paper led me to realise that, because of how modular and flexible the game engine was, I already had my project. Within the space of two weeks, I had drafted out a complete proposal of what my own undergraduate thesis would be, and after my first week of term ended, I finished building a prototype proof-of-concept as a part of my proposal; in effect, I made up for three month’s worth of time lost in the space of a week. This was made possible by the fact that I’d known the game engine so well, as well as seeing what is possible when one is sufficiently motivated through Tari Tari. In Tari Tari, the narrative progresses very rapidly because the characters don’t dawdle: they either know exactly what their goals are and will not hesitate to act in a way as to pursue them, or, when they do stumble, people in their corner help to pick them back up. I would ultimately give my proposal presentation in front of my entire graduating class, and the project was given approval to proceed, right as Wakana and her friends put on a successful final musical performance before their school closed. In this way, Tari Tari would become a masterpiece for me. I would encounter some difficulty in finding the right words for praising this series, but in subsequent years, it would become clear that Tari Tari was a series that left a nontrivial impact on my life. While the series did receive an OVA with its ultimate collector’s addition, along with a sequel novel set ten years after everyone graduated, Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro’s futures generally remain unknown to overseas fans of the series. However, if my outcomes are a reasonable precedence, it would be reasonable to suggest that, while the path may not have been the smoothest, everyone’s found their way as adults – this is an encouraging thought, but a part of me wishes to read the novel for myself because, despite Tari Tari having concluded in a very decisive manner, I’ve long wondered if Taichi ever was able to pursue a relationship with Sawa.

Masterpiece Anime Showcase: Tari Tari, The Sound of Compassion, Supporting Aspirations Through Music and A Graduate’s Swan Song

“But for me, just having fun wasn’t enough. The support of my friends was equally important; they encouraged me through my struggles. They’re all so different from me, but they’re honest and determined. We fought, but we also worked together. I know you had a friend like that, too. Someone to have fun with, someone to share her worries. Mom, I have finished the song we promised to write. Sorry it took so long. I’m glad I could create this song with you and my friends. I’ll treasure it always for bringing us together.” –Wakana Sakai

Wakana Sakai once aspired to be a musician, as her mother Mahiru, once was, but after Mahiru died, Wakana began distancing herself from music to dull the pain of her loss. Konatsu Miyamoto is an optimistic and cheerful girl with a great love for music, and seeks to redeem herself after an incident in her previous year that led to her being removed from the lineup of active singers. Sawa Okita holds aspirations to become a jockey in the future, despite her father’s wishes. Taichi Tanaka strives to be a professional badminton player, and Atsuhiro Maeda is a transfer student with a love of the sentai genre. Five disparate students, each with their own goals and troubles, are united when Konatsu seeks to form her own choral club, with the aim of being able to sing again and do something big before graduation. Brought together by music to form the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club, these individuals come to learn about one another, their strengths and weaknesses, and come to support one another on their goals while working hard to put on a performance ahead of their school’s closure. This is Tari Tari, an anime from P.A. Works dating back to 2012 that portrays the life of five high school students who are on the edge of one milestone as they prepare to finish their final year of high school. Through its thirteen episode run, Tari Tari demonstrates the power of music to bring people together, to motivate and encourage one another; each of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro each have their own aspirations, but unified by music, realise an opportunity to contribute back to their school and put on a performance that allows them to properly express thanks to those around them. When it is revealed their school is to close, Konatsu’s initial determination to sing again transforms into a performance that represent a swansong of gratitude and appreciation for the teachers and students, as well. The road to this performance also helps each of the club’s members in a tangible way: Wakana opens up to the others and comes to peace with her mother’s passing, Sawa places more trust in her friends and allow them to support her ambition to become a jockey, Taichi continues pushing forwards on his dream of playing badminton professionally, and Atsuhiro does his best to help everyone. With Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro’s support, as well as Wakana’s experience, the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club are able to send their graduating year off in style, creating a cherished memory that marks the end of one journey and the beginning of the next.

With its focus on music, Tari Tari‘s central theme speaks to the power of music, and how it is able to motivate, inspire and encourage people from different backgrounds, experiences and creed, bringing them together for a common purpose. At scale, Tari Tari‘s theme is a positive one: that music transcends cultural, linguistic and ethnographic boundaries, being able to convey emotions that are universally understood. Through music, a diverse group of individuals gather together, and working towards a shared goal of doing one final swan song before graduation, also come to find camaraderie and support in one another. Sawa comes to voice her worries about the road to being a jockey instead of keeping it to herself, and the girls encourage Taichi to do his best in badminton. Konatsu comes to understand why Wakana approaches music with a serious mindset, but Wakana herself opens up to the others, realising that her mother’s vision of music was something to be shared. Tari Tari‘s single greatest strength therefore lies in its ability to bring in people from different walks of life, set them with a common objective that unifies them, and create something compelling: the series could’ve easily been about any one of Wakana, Sawa, Konatsu, Taichi or Atsuhiro and comfortably occupied a full thirteen episodes for each arc had everyone faced down their problems independently, but together, with support from one another, solutions are reached more swiftly. Tari Tari excels at tying together so many different elements because it is able to show how music impacts everyone, and ultimately, how music is something that sets in motion the events that bring people together and set them on a trajectory towards their futures. The use of a simple, yet powerful theme allows Tari Tari to cover everyone’s stories in a compelling and satisfactory manner, resulting in an anime that is earnest and sincere in its messages.

Taken together with P.A. Works’ visually impressive presentation, a phenomenal soundtrack and strong voice acting, Tari Tari quickly became a favourite of mine: the sum of its meaningful themes and a technically excellent audio and visual component made it an anime I looked forwards to every week. Tari Tari seamlessly transitions between each of Konatsu, Wakana, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro’s stories, weaving them together in a concise and focused manner. While this could’ve ended up meandering, unfocused, Tari Tari ended up captivating me. During its run, I became invested in the characters and rooted for their success. Every episode left me in anticipation of what would happen next, and this ultimately ended up being an asset of immeasurable value: that summer, I had been studying for the MCAT, and it was an immensely stressful experience. By July, I had concluded CLANNAD and ~After Story~, and Tari Tari ended up being the show that filled in the void. By giving me something to look forwards to each week, Tari Tari helped me relax: the series had had just reached the halfway point, when Wakana becomes consumed with remorse at having okayed her father to dispose of their piano, which meant discarding the one remaining link she had with her mother. However, Wakana’s father explains that her mother had decided to keep quiet about her illness so their final memory of songwriting together would be a happy one. He reveals that he still has her old music, and never threw the piano away. Wakana realises an opportunity to finish something she had started with her mother, and her love of music is rekindled. She agrees to help Konatsu and the others, marking a turning point in Tari Tari when it is shown that support can come from anywhere. This was an encouraging course of events: I thus resolved to survive the MCAT so that I could see Wakana’s journey continue. When the MCAT concluded, Tari Tari delved into Sawa’s story, and by this point in my summer, I had the remainder of the month to myself. Watching Sawa overcome her problems, and Atsuhiro taking the lead in a local performance for the shopping district motivated me to pick up the journal publication that my lab had shelved amidst the academic term. I dusted the project off and coordinated with a few of my colleagues into helping us finish. My supervisor was pleasantly surprised the paper was revived, and agreed to proof-read it. By the end of the summer, we had a submission-ready publication, and the journal accepted it, leading this to be my first-ever journal article. For having helped give me the resolve and strength to stare down the MCAT in the days leading up to the exam and ultimately leading me to see a journal publication through to the end, Tari Tari had a nontrivial impact on me, that, in conjunction with everything that the series excels at doing, results in my counting Tari Tari to be a masterpiece.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Tari Tari began airing early in July 2012, a time when I had just wrapped up my summer course on physics and could afford to focus my entire effort into reviewing for the MCAT. I had been curious to check out Tari Tari after watching one of the trailers, which played an instrumental version of Melody of the Heart, the series’ main theme. The song had a warm, inviting sound, and my curiosity was piqued. At the time, no one knew what Tari Tari would be about: the preamble only indicated that it would be about a group of students looking to do something big for their final year of high school.

  • After the first episode aired, I was thoroughly impressed: out of the gates, Tari Tari introduced all of its main characters and gave viewers a solid idea of their personalities entering the series. Because Tari Tari deals with transitions from one part of life into the next, viewers are dropped into a bit of a chaotic time in the story: Konatsu and Sawa’s homeroom instructor, Tomoko Takahashi, is set to go on maternity leave, and everyone is wishing her the best.

  • However, this also happens to be the day that Atsuhiro transfers into their class. Tomoko tasks Taichi to look after him and give him a tour of campus. Tari Tari covers a lot of ground during a very short time, and the first episode also establishes that Konatsu is intent on having a singing role in the choral club after an accident the previous year causes her to be removed from singing. For Konatsu, singing is a form of expression and represents liberty: her love of singing comes from a childhood admiration of the Condor Queens, a band known for their Spanish performances, and when her appeal to music instructor Naoko Takakura fails, she resolves to start her own club.

  • Wakana starts out her journey cold and detached, removed from the others. Serious and dedicated, she sports a no-nonsense personality; when Konatsu approaches her to start a new choral club, Wakana rebukes her, remarking that music isn’t a game. However, Konatsu’s opinion of music, that it’s more than just an art form to perfect, does cause Wakana to pause for a moment – Mahiru had a similarly optimistic and cheerful outlook on music, seeing it as something that could bring people together and otherwise convey intangible concepts.

  • Tari Tari is full of nuance: the first few episodes have both Wakana and Naoko as being unsympathetic to Konatsu’s desire to perform. While it is not immediately apparent, Wakana and Naoko have their own reasons for having such a rigid mindset on music: subtle details such as these really give life to the characters of Tari Tari, and as more about everyone is shown, viewers come to empathise with what they’re going through. When Wakana reluctantly agree to be the pianist for Sawa and Konatsu during their first concert, a hint of her true personality is shown – underneath her stoic personality is someone with the same warmth and kindness as Mahiru.

  • P.A. Works’ series are not known for their fanservice components, so it was a bit of a surprise to see Taichi’s older sister chilling in his room when Atsuhiro arrives at his place. My history with Tari Tari is a bit of an interesting one: I followed it weekly when it was airing, and then wrote a brief piece about it at my old website. Two years later, I returned to write about it again as I transitioned away from my old site to the current blog. Reading through my old review led me to rewatch Tari Tari, and on this third revisit, I found that Tari Tari, besides being excellent from a story and technical point of view, also did two important things: it contributed to me getting through a trickier time and also influenced some of P.A. Works’ later works to a nontrivial extent.

  • Tari Tari‘s soundtrack is composed by Shirō Hamaguchi, who had previously worked on the music to Ah! My GoddessGirls und PanzerHanasaku IrohaHaruchika and The Magnificent Kotobuki. Of these, Ah! My Goddess stands out: while the 2004 TV series had more ordinary music, his work on the 2000 film resulted in a soundtrack of sublime quality, and in Girls und Panzer, the superb range of music, from militaristic combat themes to the everyday slice of life pieces and marching songs, really highlights how versatile Hamaguchi is. It is therefore unsurprising that the music of Tari Tari is of such a high standard.

  • Tari Tari marks the first time I’d seen a series breaking so many established conventions: in most anime, a club on the brink of dissolution would receive its members in the first few episodes, and then spend the remainder of the series exploring their chosen specialisation. In Tari Tari, Konatsu managed to assemble an entire choir and performs, but loses these members almost immediately, forcing her to seek creative means of keeping her club together. She eventually builds the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club in the aftermath, unfairly defeating Taichi and Atsuhiro in a three-on-two badminton match that certainly wouldn’t be regulation. Tari Tari also pioneered the idea of a club being able to have more than one focus to keep enough members to stay afloat, something that would be revisited in Iroduku and Koisuru Asteroid.

  • With the benefit of hindsight, it is easy to see why Naoko is so adamant that Konatsu not form the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club; after Konatsu finds Mahiru’s old song, Melody of the Heart, Naoko acts out of respect for Mahiru’s memory, feeling Konatsu to be desecrating things. However, as Wakana begins to open up, Naoko realises that Wakana desires to carry on in her mother’s footsteps. The principal is able to spot this earlier on, and when Konatsu appeals to him directly, he allows their club to carry on, knowing what it means to Wakana, as well.

  • A secondary theme in Tari Tari is that small groups of devoted, dedicated people are capable of achieving great things together. Despite having lost all of their previous members who had musical background, the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s remaining members are committed despite not possessing the same level of training and skill. That Sawa and Konatsu were able to perform earlier on hinted at this, and so, it is with five members that the club moves ahead with its activities, although at this point, Wakana is still only a member in name, being occupied with her own challenges.

  • Konatsu decides to sign the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club up for a local music festival, but when the Condor Queens show up, she begins wavering. This causes a rift between Sawa and Konatsu, but the two reconcile after Wakana helps the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club to secure a stage. In the end, despite performing only for three children and their parents, the club still manages to put on a decent showing that impresses their audience. It is from humble beginnings that the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club start from, but their tenacity and determination to be more is what drives Tari Tari. Along this journey, past hurts are healed and dreams are realised.

  • Tari Tari is one of those anime that I could have written about in an episodic fashion, since each and every episode has so much worth talking about, and I actually had considered revisiting the anime episode by episode, pointing out all of the bits of foreshadowing and each episode’s contributions to the series. In Tari Tari, each and every detail is relevant to the big picture. However, it became clear that, while Tari Tari deserved an episodic review, my schedule wouldn’t allow for it, so I’ve chosen to instead talk about it at a much higher level.

  • At the local badminton tournament, Taichi is unable to advance, but despite his disappointment, he vows to work harder. It is here that Taichi begins developing a crush on Sawa; she starts the party by trying to connect with him and shares more about her interest in being a jockey, which in turn drives Taichi’s desire to know more about her. A ways back, I wrote a post on why the feelings were mutual: besides the body language in the scene, it is Sawa, and not Konatsu, who decides to go back and see how Taichi is doing after his loss. Sawa’s also got a bit more of a playful side to her, buying Konatsu a hot drink on a hot day.

  • Wakana’s relationship with her mother had not been the best in recent years, and her biggest regret is not being more understanding prior to Mahiru’s death. Seeing the old piano brings back memories of this pain and guilt, which is why she initially wanted to get rid of it. The episode is characterised by an incoming typhoon, which casts the whole of Enoshima in a moody, grim light, mirroring Wakana’s feelings. However, the next morning, the storm has gone, and Wakana’s developed cold. Seeing a despondent Wakana leads Konatsu to believe the worst, and she falls into a tide pool when attempting to “save” Wakana.

  • For Wakana, talking it out is how she comes to terms with what had happened: hearing the impact Mahiru had on those around her, whether it be Shiho (Sawa’s mother) or the Condor Queens helps Wakana to appreciate the carefree and spirited attitude. Being able to listen to Shiho and the Condor Queens share their stories really makes Mahiru’s contributions tangible, far more than listening to old recordings and reading letters alone could accomplish. The sum of these memories, in conjunction with a conversation with her father, finally allows Wakana to accept what happened, and also turn over a new leaf, to fulfil her promise to Mahiru and write a song together.

  • In a few weeks, the leaves will start turning yellow as summer fully gives way to autumn. Throughout Tari Tari, Mahiru is presented as being warm, spirited and understanding. She touched countless people with her carefree and accepting beliefs on music, believing the first and foremost aspect was to have fun. This belied an incredible talent and skill in composition, and Wakana initially did not understand this about Mahiru. The flashbacks in Tari Tari, in conjunction with frequent mention of Mahiru’s impact, shows that she’s left a lasting legacy, and even though she might be gone, Wakana will always have the happy memories to guide and inspire her.

  • With the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s activities in full-swing now that Wakana is on board, Konatsu sets about trying to determine what their presentation for the culture festival will be. However, the other choral club members doubt Konatsu, and moreover, Naoko will need to okay any use of the main stage. In spite of this, Wakana decides to press forward, studying composition to see how to best finish her mother’s song, which she plans on using for the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s performance. Here, the reflection of the room’s windows can be seen on the whiteboard: Tari Tari makes extensive use of reflective surfaces to create a well-lit feeling in its environments.

  • Once Wakana’s story is concluded, Tari Tari switches over to Sawa: Konatsu and Taichi’s stories were a bit shorter, but Sawa’s story is a bit more fully-fleshed. It turns out that her aspiration to become a jockey is met with opposition: her father disapproves, and moreover, Sawa’s physique does not appear to be suited for the occupation. She begins an aggressive diet in a bid to lose weight and make the requirements, but this results in fatigue and lethargy. After falling off her horse during archery practise from fatigue and lack of food energy, Sawa is taken to the local hospital to be examined for any injuries, and her father implores her to stand down.

  • Like Wakana, Sawa feels that her problems are hers alone to bear, that no one else would understand what she’s going through, and for this, her mannerisms take a noticeable shift: Tari Tari had presented Sawa as outgoing and playful, so to see a dramatic change was to show how heavily the future weighs on her mind. Sawa and Wakana’s stories are the top of Tari Tari, and the fact that they were so clearly presented indicates that even with a time constraint, shorter anime can still succeed in telling a compelling, full-fledged story that viewers can connect with.

  • While practising at Atsuhiro’s place, Sawa finally comes forwards with her troubles to the others. However, when Wakana suggests taking a step back to regroup, Sawa goes ballistic. She lashes out, suggesting that Wakana’s already got a background in music and that for her, it’s different. Indeed, Wakana’s love for music and Sawa’s determination to become a jockey are rooted by different motivations, but it does bring about one important point: the future is always uncertain, and the things people end up falling in love with doing might not always be what they’s sought out. When I revisited Tari Tari two years after the MCAT, my desire to go into medicine had been displaced by a newfound love for software development, for instance.

  • It’s easy to get caught up in the gravity of the moment, but Wakana’s suggestion was never to give up being a jockey, and instead, look at the problem from a different perspective. Sawa subsequently spends the remainder of the episode in poor spirits and takes a sick day, even as the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club sets off to prove their worth to Naoko, who reluctantly allows them to perform if they can make the audition. In order for the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club to stand a chance, they need Sawa, and ultimately, it is Wakana who takes the initiative to call her. Realising that she’s still needed, Sawa understands what Wakana and the others are doing for her, and immediately sets off for school on her horse, barely making it ahead of their slot.

  • In the aftermath, Sawa’s father sees the scope of her determination, and while still reluctant to allow her to pursue a career, realises that her daughter is hardworking and determined. He is later seen yelling at the admissions staff, saying he’ll personally curse them if they don’t relax the admission’s requirements for physique. It’s a rather touching moment that shows how, despite his outward appearance, Sawa’s father does care greatly for her. With Sawa’s story in the books, and the audition securing them a spot, Konatsu decides to go big on their performance for the culture festival, adding a play on top of their singing.

  • When the local shōtengai reports a decline in revenue from the previous year, Shiho suggests a radical new event: a live-action performance featuring sentai, the equivalent of Marvel or DC’s superheroes. This interpretation of superheroes has become iconic in Japan, and the Power Ranges are a particularly famous series. While outwardly different from something like the MCU sentai heroes fight in teams and strive to uphold justice the same way the Avengers do. Atsuhiro is very keen about this genre, seeing it as representative of the idea that good can prevail over evil, and the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club take on the job to help raise money for their performance.

  • Despite her experience with music, Wakana struggles with the composition of the song that Mahiru had left her. Shiho ends up pointing her in the right direction: Naoko had once studied music as well, being Mahiru’s classmate, and as such, should have some suggestions up her sleeve. Like Wakana, she is very unsympathetic to Konatsu’s attempts to run her own choral club because Mahiru’s death hit her hard. While viewers may find it difficult to accept Naoko’s character, Tari Tari does an excellent job of giving credence to why individuals act the way they do.

  • In Atsuhiro’s arc, he becomes distracted upon learning that all of the letters he’d written to Jan, a friend back home in Austria, were never delivered because he’d changed addresses. When the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club discover this, Atsuhiro comes into the open and, having now voiced his concerns, remarks that he’s confident Jan is going to be fine, and that he can also focus on his goals. Like Sawa, Wakana and Taichi, expressing his worries helps him to see an out. Owing to his love for sentai, Atsuhiro is the most enthusiastic and coaches the others in their roles.

  • The end result is an impressive performance, and when Atsuhiro stops a would-be thief with Taichi, Sawa, Wakana and Konatsu despite being physically outmatched, it really demonstrates the strength of his character. This was a fun arc in Tari Tari that gives viewers a better measure of Atsihiro’s character, and I remark here that while Konatsu and the others affectionately refer to Atsuhiro as “Wein” (after Austria’s capital, Vienna), I prefer calling Atsuhiro by his given name because this is the way to properly address the characters and furthermore, avoids confusion.

  • Once the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club secure the funds for their costumes and props, it’s full steam ahead as they prepare for the culture festival. Tari Tari has one final curveball to throw at them: it turns out their school is closing down because the area has been zoned for new development. The timing is such that it would cause the cancellation of the cultural festival, but Wakana ends up finishing her song, and she pushes to have their own festival anyways, since this song represents not just her, but the sum of the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s efforts, a product of self-discovery that each of Konatsu, Taichi, Sawa and Atsuhiro have experienced since they met.

  • During the preparations, Taichi and Sawa spend more time together, and Taichi eventually develops a crush on Sawa. This shouldn’t be terribly surprising, since Tari Tari had foreshadowed this early on: the two have been through quite a bit together as members of the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club, and when he’d failed to make the competition, Sawa had been the first to check up on him to make sure he was alright. Indeed, Taichi does attempt a kokuhaku at the series’ end, but the outcome of this is left ambiguous, and for fans of Tari Tari, this has been a bit of a sore spot, since viewers believed that Taichi and Sawa deserved a happy ending of sorts.

  • Despite being unsuccessful in convincing the student council to permit the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club to press on, Konatsu’s efforts are admirable, and she manages to convince the choral club to help her. Owing to an accident, the props that Atsuhiro had worked on are discarded. The club manages to recover them at the local landfill, and with Taichi’s help, the props and costumes inch their way to completion better than before. Meanwhile, Sawa heads off to try and enlist the shōtengai association’s help in gathering an audience.

  • While visiting Mahiru’s grave, Wakana runs into Naoko. It is here that the extent of Naoko’s friendship with Mahiru becomes apparent, and seeing Wakana finish Mahiru’s final composition convinces Naoko that Wakana is a worthy musician, someone who has the skill to continue bringing joy into the world through music. This was incredibly touching, and with her effort, Wakana demonstrates that the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club is worthy of her respect. On the day of the festival, Naoko fetches the wind instrument club and choral club to help with the performance.

  • While the principal has always been somewhat of a pushover when it came to the school’s future, he ultimately decides that sending the students off in style and leaving a positive memory matters more than a comfortable retirement bonus. He discards the developer’s proposal and allows the festival to be held. There is no time to lose as the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club press forwards with the preparations for their performance. The rainy weather gives way to sunshine, and ultimately, the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s performance is an unqualified success, capturing everyone’s feelings and thoughts regarding their journey and time together.

  • After lectures ended, I had spent most of the afternoon of the day before at the Telus SPARK Science Centre helping to get things set up, and the Friday night of six years ago was the opening night. Looking back, The Giant Walkthrough Brain would have been my Radiant Melody: after being tasked with testing the viability of the Unity Game Engine to provide a virtual visualisation of Jay Ingram’s show in May, I ended up taking the lead on the development of the software side of things, and over four months, I implemented, tested and improved the Giant Walkthrough Brain. Following a successful showing at the Banff Centre, the true test would come as the Giant Walkthrough Brain was presented for Beakerhead, a local science programme: I worried that at Telus SPARK, I would need to implement a different type of projection to create a 3D view for the geodesic dome.

  • Fortunately, we only needed standard projection, and having built the Unity project in a way to be extensible, I had no trouble with configuring it for the Beakerhead presentation requirements. The two performances for the Beakerhead Giant Walkthrough Brain were to sold-out crowds on both evenings and was a complete a success by all definitions. Watching the Beakerhead performance was every bit as rewarding and thrilling as seeing the culmination of Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Atsuhiro’s final performance, a superb musical that combines drama with singing that acts as a swan song for both Tari Tari and the high school’s final graduating class. The weather transitions from a moody and rainy day shortly before the performance: the sunny breaks acts as a visual metaphor for the beginning of a new era, a well-lit one characterised by hope.

  • The Giant Walkthrough Brain came to represent what was possible with computer science, and set me down the path towards my graduate thesis project. Like the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club’s successful magnum opus, I count the Giant Walkthrough Brain to be one of the things I’m most proud of having done in my youth, and for my contributions, The Giant Walkthrough Brain project would earn me an city-wide award for “exceptional extra-curricular contribution of computer science skills to the community”. These are the sorts of contributions I hope that all youth have a chance to make: using their skills to tangibly and positively impact their community: there is a skill component (it takes a bit of patience to learn a system like Unity), but it should be clear that the results are well worth it.

  • Tari Tari‘s use of light is meant to evoke the idea that as light reaches even the darkest, out of the way spots, it casts these places in warmth and gives them hope. Wide windows allow light to permeate the buildings, and similarly an honest, open dynamic amongst the characters allow them to support one another and find hope where it appears all is lost. It is therefore appropriate that Wakana and Naoko share their thoughts with one another beside a window as sunlight streams into the room: while the empty classroom creates a sense of melancholy, the warmth in the scene comes from Wakana and Naoko coming to terms with Mahiru’s death together: both Naoko and Wakana can depend on one another to cherish their memories of Mahiru and continue advancing music in her memory, as well as for their own futures.

  • In the end, everyone reaches their graduation and prepares to step into their own futures. Sawa’s already taken off to attend an equestrian school overseas, having been accepted into their program, but is granted a diploma anyways for having completed all of the requirements. As Tari Tari drew to a close, I entered my honours thesis year: seeing the sort of determination spurred my intentions to complete a journal publication during the summer, after the project had fallen by the wayside during term. For our troubles, we were accepted into the publication, and this accomplishment also helped one of my colleagues make the honours thesis programme. Their GPA had just missed the minimum requirements by a small faction, but having a publication proved to the department they were qualified for the work. With this and my supervisor vouching for them, they were reinstated.

  • This final year stands as my favourite undergraduate year, as we each worked on our own projects, supported one another and ultimately, defended our work the following April. I don’t think anyone in our year failed our thesis projects. For me, Tari Tari has many moments that are memorable, being attached to pivotal moments during my time as a student; this contributes to a bit of my bias as to why I found the anime so moving and enjoyable. Viewers have longed for a continuation, and while no sequel anime ever materialised, a special OVA set during the winter was released with a commemorative BD collection, and in 2018, a novel, Tari Tari ~Mebaitari Terashitari Yappari Tokidoki Utattari~ (Tari Tari ~Budding, Shining, and Sometimes Singing~) was announced.

  • This novel is set ten years after the anime’s events, and sees the characters reunite to help Yukine, a high school student who is still searching for her way. Unfortunately, I’ve not heard much at all about this project: the first chapter was originally published on August 1, 2018, and new chapters were supposed to be published bimonthly, but I’ve found nothing of the project as of yet. However, while we may not have the full story from the sequel, Tari Tari portrays Wakana walking along the same path she normally walks, sporting a longer hairstyle similar to Mahiru’s. She smiles warmly, bringing Tari Tari to a close and assuring viewers that, with everything she’s experienced, she’s in a much better place now and ready to seize the future.

Tari Tari is often overlooked where discussions of P.A. Works’ anime are concerned: this is, after all, the studio that has brought viewers the likes of Angel Beats!, Hanasaku Iroha, Nagi no Asukara and Shirobako, each of which are veritable masterpieces in their own right for excellence in capturing the viewer’s interest with their characters, setting and premise. However, Tari Tari‘s contributions to P.A. Works’ repertoire of productions cannot be understated. As the production following Hanasaku Iroha, Tari Tari inherits many elements from its predecessor, especially a cast of characters of different backgrounds that each share a common goal. However, whereas Hanasaku Iroha required a full twenty-six episodes to tell its story, Tari Tari managed to condense that experience down into half the runtime. The success in Tari Tari, then, was demonstrating that even with a reduced episode count, it was still possible to draw upon the elements that made Hanasaku Iroha so successful, and moreover, P.A. Works now had two series that were successful following a busier, more multi-faceted set of characters in a coming-of-age setting. Tari Tari‘s legacy is therefore understated; in addition to being an exceptional anime, Tari Tari confirmed that P.A. Works had a winning combination that could fit into a thirteen or twenty six episode format. confident that series with a large number of characters each working towards the same objective can captivate audiences, P.A. Works would go on to create outstanding experiences through Shirobako, Sakura Quest and Irodoku. Each of these series have proven to be immensely enjoyable in their own right, taking the concepts from Tari Tari and successfully applying them to different settings, from the anime production workplace, to a remote town and even a world with magic to create captivating series well worth one’s while.

Being cloudy, shining, singing again someday: Revisiting a review of the Tari Tari OVA

“God has given us two hands: one to receive with and the other to give with. We are not cisterns made for hoarding; we are channels made for sharing.” —Billy Graham

Released on December 17, 2015, the Tari Tari OVA has proven to be the most elusive OVA encountered in living memory. Straying out of thought and time, the OVA was alone, forgotten, without escape from the dark corners of the world. The stars wheeled overhead, but it is not the end. I will recount the OVA account, and share it for my part. In my earlier talk, I briefly summarised the OVA, where Wakana, Sawa and Konatsu wonder what to do as the winter holidays approach. While Konatsu is itching towards karaoke as the group cleans up their club room, the others feel it is prudent to study. It isn’t until later that Sawa decides to gather everyone together to sing a song that commemorates their time together. This song, titled “いつまでも輝きを” (Shining Forever) is featured as the OVA’s ending song and has a runtime of around four minutes. While it’s not a sequel that depicts the character’s fates following their graduation, it does nonetheless represent a welcome piece of Tari Tari: when it had aired back in 2012, I found Tari Tari to be a wonderful anime that depicted the thoughts and emotions of a group of friends on a cusp, as they begin the transition from one stage to the next. It was a story that numerous viewers (should be able to) relate to, and coupled with exceptional artwork, has been one of P.A. Works’ more memorable titles.

The main point of interest surrounding the OVA is where it things are chronologically set relative to the remainder of Tari Tari, if it is not a sequel. Wakana mentions that it’s December early on in the OVA, and the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton club are cleaning up their clubroom in preparation for the winter holidays. Later, while lying in bed, Sawa reminisces about the day where she and Wakana, Konatsu, Taichi and Wein performed one final time during the autumn period prior to their school’s closure (construction crews do not begin preparing the site for demolition until March of the following year, during the same time as the graduation ceremony). Therefore, it is possible to say with complete confidence that this OVA takes place during the final episode, during the eyecatch at its halfway point; the OVA depicts a brief snapshot of a period after their performance and before graduation in March. Thus, the eyecatch skips a period of around half a year, and the fact that P.A. Works chose not to depict what happened during this time suggests that Wakana and her friends were busy preparing for their entrance exams and pursuit of their post-secondary plans, although this brief moment during their winter break was meritorious of additional mention. It is interesting to note that by this point, Sawa’s parents still exhibit some doubts about her career choices, in spite of their determination to support her earlier on in the series.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • Because of how difficult it’s been to find anything on the Tari Tari OVA, I’ve optimised this post to be hopefully more searchable by referring to the OVA as such, rather than by its full name (Kumottari, Kagayaitari, Mata Itsuka Utattari). To improve things further, each image here links to a 1080p full-sized copy that can be easily downloaded. I’ve updated my previous talk on the Tari Tari OVA so the images there can be viewed in full-resolution, as well. The decision to do a second post within a half-year was not lightly made, and this talk aims to provide a definitive answer as to when the events of the OVA are set, as well as provide the highest possible resolution images of this OVA.

  • Although the Tari Tari OVA does not particularly offer much in the way of anything new, it was nonetheless quite pleasant to see the characters return again. I consider Tari Tari to be one of P.A. Works’ best slice-of-life anime; it wasn’t about any one thing in particular, dealing with Wakana, Konatsu and Sawa’s aspirations as high school drew to a close. Appropriately, its title, “Tari Tari“, is used as a suffix in Japanese to indicate doing “stuff”, being quite similar to “-ing” in English whenever an action is being performed in present tense.

  • As noted in the previous discussion, there is a bit of melancholy in this OVA: besides being projected by the lighting at dialogue in-show, said melancholy can also be felt owing to the audience’s knowledge that this short OVA is very likely the last we’ll see of Tari Tari, given that P.A. Works does not do sequels. Their past records show that any continuations they’ve done depict events set in the middle of a series.

  • Consequently, it is most unlikely that Wakana, Konatsu and Sawa’s fates will ever be given solid closure. One thing I would’ve most like to see was what ultimately happened to Sawa and Taichi: subtle signs were present throughout Tari Tari that the two shared unspoken, mutual feelings for one another, and while the scene at the airport was devoid of dialogue, it’s very likely that Taichi confessed his feelings to Sawa here.

  • Despite being a seven-minute long feature with a four-minute long montage using footage from the original anime, the Tari Tari OVA has lost none of its visual fidelity. Being three years old does not change my claims that Tari Tari easily has the best visuals out of any P.A. Works titles, even beating out Glasslip and Nagi no Asukara. The reason for this is the delicate balance of colour that allows the anime to depict both vivid and brooding environments to augment the atmosphere surrounding each moment: none of their other titles does this quite as well, and in fact, recent titles like Shirobako seem a little underwhelming by comparison with respect to the visual aspect.

  • I still recall the previous year in August, during which I published a talk on Sabagebu! after having a steak-and-lobster dinner at The Keg. This first weekend of August, I celebrated a year’s of aging with a dinner at Tony Roma’s: I had the wish for a good rack of ribs and ordered what is known as the “Ultimate Grill Power”, which added an eight-ounce sirloin steak and skewer of grilled shrimp with the ribs. My standard for assessing the quality of ribs is by how easily the meat falls off the bones, and their ribs pass this test nicely, being tender and tasty.

  • The eventual fate of Taichi’s feelings is left unknown, leaving a somewhat unpleasant feeling amongst the audience, most of whom wished that more time was directed towards following Sawa and Taichi’s growing relationship. However, I contend that the decision to leave this aspect in the sidelines, and merely illustrate it subtly, allowed Tari Tari to focus on the character’s futures and not devolve into an ill-executed love story.

  • I’ve been in Taichi’s shoes before, and in both instances, there were no storybook endings. With that being said, life’s too short really worry about these things. Realistically, even if Taichi’s feelings went unanswered, the possibilities in life remain limitless, and while I’ll earn some disdainful looks from some, I contend that the things that are truly worth having hardly ever come easily, so a good relationship is no exception.

  • The weather today finally decided that the time was ripe for a change from the sunshine we’ve been fortunate to enjoy, and this morning, the rain began falling in earnest, bringing a much-needed downpour and the associated cooling to the city. While it stopped briefly, it’s back now in the form of an evening thunderstorm. The past weekend was quite eventful: I paid a visit to the local bookstore to check out Tom Clancy’s Full Force and Effect before settling down to a summer evening of fried chicken, and yesterday, celebrated several birthdays with family. The weather had been quite hot, compounded by the stagnant air, making perfect weather for being out and about, and with the work week resuming, it’s nice that we’re getting rain.

  • It’s quite easy to see why Sawa’s father disapproves of her being a jockey: in the United States, the average jockey makes around 35000 USD per year owing to the fees a jockey must pay out to their agent and valet. While there are exceptional jockeys who make a substantial income, they are rare, hence her parent’s apprehension into allowing her to pursue her interests.

  • Sources out there state that the average height of a jockey ranges from 4’10 to 5’6, and an average mass of 108 to 118 pounds. Sawa is 5’6 and weighs 121 pounds, which puts her at the upper bounds for the recommended physical characteristics for a jockey: her arc in the original anime illustrates her determination to become a jockey, even going to extremes by dieting in an attempt to lower her mass. Once her friends and parents realise this, this do their part to support her to the best of their ability.

  • Doubting her plans for the future, Sawa scrolls through her phone and finds a photograph of their performance together, evoking memories of how much fun it had been to perform one final time together for a large audience. This performance acted as a swan song for the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton club, with their determination to see things through being sufficient to motivate other students to help them out, even as their school was slated for closure.

  • Of her friends, only Sawa wields a smart phone with a touch screen. In North America, smart phones are the dominant phone on the market owing to their versatility, but in Japan, flip-phones are still widely used. Despite lacking the raw processing power and hardware of a smart phone, Japanese flip phones are capable of video playback, running some mobile applications and connecting to the internet. Their dominance in Japan arises from highly expensive plans for smartphones: flip phone plans are much more affordable, suggesting that the Okita family is relatively wealthy.

  • While flip phones are making a resurgence in Japan, back over in North America, smart phones are continuing to march on, with each successive generation sporting improved hardware. The present trend seems to be that, with the lessening gap between mobile and computer operating systems, phones may eventually replace PCs and become full-fledged computing solutions in their own right. So, if one wanted to use their phone as a computer tower, they’d merely need to attach it to a dock for power, connect it to an external display and add a keyboard/mouse.

  • The Tari Tari OVA takes on a Christmas theme to tie in with the fact that the BD box set was released in December, just in time for the Christmas season. During this time, I was gearing up to go on a vacation in Taiwan and Hong Kong, marking the first time I traveled abroad during the winter season. Things like snow, eggnog and Christmas dinner was swapped for enjoying the sunshine of Southern Taiwan and watching the New Year fireworks in Hong Kong’s central district, which was, while quite different, not unwelcome.

  • This spot is likely the near the Samuel Cocking Garden, underneath the Enoshima Sea Candle. The original garden was founded in 1880 by British merchant Samuel Cocking as the Enoshima Botanical Garden, and featured a greenhouse where he collected tropical plants. The greenhouse was destroyed in an earthquake, and in 2004, a new garden was opened in the area. The Enoshima Sea Candle is a private lighthouse that was completed in 2003. Built for the 100th anniversary celebration of Enoshima Electric Railway, its observation deck can be accessed by a series of escalators. With a height of 40 meters, the observation deck provides a stunning panoramic view of the area that, by nightfall, is considered as the sxith best “Japan Heritage Night View”; the tower itself is illuminated by a solar power generation device installed on the south side during the hours of darkness.

  • On the morning of their gathering, the skies are grey and moody. However, it is still quite warm in Enoshima: the average temperature in the area is around 13°C in December, which is my city’s average temperature in June, and in December, we average -7°C. Consequently, whenever I hear any talk that it becomes “cold” in some regions of Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong, I’m quick to dismiss it, for their weak winter is no match for Real Canadian Winter.

  • When Wakana arrives, it turns out Wein and Taichi are already there, performing a Christmas variant of the Ganba Red song. One must admire Wein’s boldness, which leads Konatsu to become embarrassed, but Wakana quickly tunes in to the Christmas spirit and begins singing “Forever shining”, after which everyone else joins in. The song clocks in at four minutes, and is very soothing in tone.

  • There were two major themes in Tari Tari that figured prominently: the importance of openness in friendship, and the impact of taking the initiative to do something meaningful as one journey of life draws to a close. In both Wakana and Sawa’s cases, opening up allowed the others to help them overcome their troubles, and by the end of Tari Tari, Wakana is much friendlier than she had been at the series’ beginning.

  • After “Forever Shining” comes to an end, a still of the plaza under a light dusting of snow is presented. Although rare, snow can fall here, as it did during February 2013, lending itself to a scene distinctly feeling of Christmas: it’s clear that the Tari Tari OVA issomething that is best watched during the Christmas season, and on that remark, this post comes to an end.

Though it might be brazen for me to say so, I conclude that viewers are unlikely to be missing out on much even without the Tari Tari OVA. I justify this claim by saying that, since the OVA was not a continuation or epilogue, and its keystone is the “Forever shining” song set to flashbacks of the events in Tari Tari‘s main story, rather than any new footage. Consequently, though welcomed as an opportunity to see Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Wein perform together again, the OVA does not contribute anything new to Tari Tari. With that being said, it is a strange fate that audiences would be held in the dark for so long, over so short and simple an OVA. More than a half-year has now elapsed since the original slated release date, and there are still no avenues to access this OVA for viewers outside of Japan. According to sales figures, 1923 copies of the Tari Tari Complete Box were sold in Japan within four days of the BD volume’s release. With a price tag of 295 CAD, one wonders just how many of these sales were motivated by the want of a seven-minute short, and whether or not this price tag might be the explanation behind why the Tari Tari OVA continues to remain inaccessible to audiences outside of Japan.

Kumottari, Kagayaitari, Mata Itsuka Utattari (Being cloudy, shining, singing again someday): Tari Tari Special Review

“Selfish persons are incapable of loving others, but they are not capable of loving themselves either.” —Erich Fromm

The Tari Tari Special is a seven-minute special is titled Kumottari, Kagayaitari, Mata Itsuka Utattari (曇ったり、輝いたりまたい、つか歌ったり; Being cloudy, shining, singing again someday) and features a new song, “Itsumademo Kagayaki wo” (Shining Forever) sung by the members of the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton Club (Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Wein). This special is exclusive to the complete Blu-Ray Box Set, which costs 28000 yen (295 CAD), and features a special 100-page booklet, a commentary track by the voice actors, and even the footage from the September 2012 event “Shirahamazaka Koukou Kanshasai” (Shirahamazaka High School Thanks Festival). The Tari Tari Special itself deals with Wakana, Konatsu, Sawa, Taichi and Wein as the Christmas season approaches, as they decide how to spend the Christmas holidays. Before the holidays can start, the group decides to clean out their club room and encounter some other third years in the music department. Upon returning home, Sawa shares another conversation with her parents about her future; although it doesn’t prove fruitful, she decides to do something nonetheless, and messages her friends, inviting them to caroling to commemorate their time as students at Shirahamazaka High School.

Screenshots and Commentary

  • This post was rushed out into the publishing stage, so this time around, I only have ten screenshots, and a shorter discussion. I’ll return at some point in the future to add an expanded discussion about Tari Tari Special and provide more screenshots, but for the present, this will hopefully be sufficient to illustrate what’s happening with the OVA, which, from the looks of things, have not been accessible to most English-speaking anime fans.

  • As is befitting of the winter timeframe, sunlight takes on a whiter hue. The Tari Tari Special has not lost any of the visual fidelity that its TV incarnation did, but the lighting and mood tends towards the melancholy, subtly hinting that one stage of their journey is about to end sa everyone looks back on their past year.

  • Sawa’s habit of squeezing Konatsu’s face whenever irritated with her makes a return: she’s growing frustrated that Konatsu is not helping the others clean, marking yet another hallmark from the original TV series. Truth be told, Tari Tari deserved more than just a seven-minute short as the form of a continuation; while the series ended on a decisive, satisfying note, I would’ve liked to see a movie or longer OVA that depicted what happens after graduation.

  • Here, some junior students in the Wind Ensemble club are saying farewell to their seniors. I wonder who actually shelled out the 28000 yen to purchase this special edition Blu-Ray. However, a Blu-Ray for the series had already been available for sale, and for those who’ve already purchased the other volumes, buying this special edition set would be tantamount to spending roughly three hundred dollars just for the seven-minute special (as well as the other bonus features). Thus, the question becomes: is this OVA and a few other features worth the extra money?

  • This screenshot nicely captures the beauty of the landscapes and skies of Tari Tari: the deep blue in the sky and the high-altitudes cirrus clouds convey the sense that the weather is going to become cooler and moody quite soon. Returning to the question raised by the previous bullet, the practical answer is “no”: three hundred dollars can net one a Chromebook, a pair of university textbooks, five titles at launch price, or a Cantonese Banquet for six, to name a few. Of course, the prudent thing to do is to save it, and this is the course of action I’d take.

  • However, for some anime fans in Japan, the desire to have access to the OVA overrules other counterarguments. Back in the OVA, Wakana receives a message from Sawa, inviting her out for an activity. The use of lighting in this scene suggests that Wakana sees studying as something best done alone, so one can focus. Notice the use of a space-heater: contrasting my nation, where homes have centralised heating, in Asia, most homes just have air conditioning.

  • Thus, in winter, things get a bit chilly even when the thermometer reads 12°C, although with due respect, it’s not truly cold until one experiences life at -40°C: even with centralised heating, going outside becomes quite difficult, doubly so if there’s windchill. Konatsu gets a similar message from Sawa, as well. It seems that everyone’s decided to study over their break, and while this is the proper thing to do, there’s nothing wrong with taking a break with friends every now and then.

  • Wein and Taichi bring their spirits to their song: the OVA manages to find the means of bringing everyone’s unique points out in the space of seven minutes, reminding me of every character’s contributions to Tari Tari. The one logistical fault in the OVA is the fact that everyone manages to sing a new song to the level of quality that they did, despite having never practised at all.

  • By this point in time, Wakana’s fully opened herself up to the Choir-and-sometimes-Badminton club, bringing sleigh bells and reindeer ears to help their song along. This song is remarkably warm, and the use of sleigh bells means that it feels like a Christmas song. We recall the release date: the Blu-Ray Special was probably intended to be ready just in time for the Winter Holidays in Japan.

  • Thus ends a shorter talk for this OVA: I’ll return to regular programming next time, with a talk on Expelled from Paradise. Aside from being a pleasant addition to the Tari Tari series, the OVA also happens to be prohibitively inaccessible at present. I hope that things become more accessible in the near future, such that Tari Tari fans have a chance to check the special out and listen to “Itsumademo Kagayaki wo” in all of its glory.

It’s been almost 30 months since Tari Tari last aired, and although the OVA is only seven minutes, it was most welcoming to see everyone sing again in the present. The song is a remarkably gentle piece that has a very warm, slow pacing that simultaneously evokes a Christmas mood and recalls memories of why I enjoyed the series to the extent that I did. The OVA illustrates another facet of Sawa’s character, showing her as someone who takes the initiative to bring her friends together. In doing so, Sawa helps everyone create yet another precious memory of them having spent time together singing, suggesting that she is immensely grateful to have friends who care about her, and that she’s willing to be there for them, as well. On a superficial note, this adds to the list of justifications for why Sawa is my favourite Tari Tari character, and as far as contributions to the original anime go, this reinforces Sawa as someone who has a reasonably clear understanding of what her aspirations are.